Save the Children is working with education partners in the hardest hit areas of North Carolina to help repair facilities and replace classroom materials damaged by Hurricane Dorian.

CHILDREN'S EMERGENCY FUND
Nobody knows when the next crisis will strike, but your support helps Save the Children provide assistance in the critical first hours and days of an emergency when children need us most. When generous people like you make your 100% tax-deductible gift, children's lives are saved and their futures are brighter.

Facts & Figures: Hurricane Dorian

Hurricane Dorian, the fourth named storm of the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season, has been slow-moving and unpredictable. The threat of damaging winds and potential for widespread flooding has put vulnerable children at risk.

In addition to widespread flooding, hurricanes can damage vital infrastructure, including homes and schools, and impact communities for years to come. As Hurricane Dorian continues to track north, we're urging families and caregivers to talk to their children about the storm and take immediate steps to keep them safe.

When did Hurricane Dorian make landfall in the U.S.?
What is the history of hurricanes in Florida and the Carolinas?
How does Save the Children help families and children prepare for a hurricane?
How is Save the Children responding to Hurricane Dorian? 
How can I help Hurricane Dorian survivors?

When did Hurricane Dorian make landfall in the U.S.?
On the morning of Friday, September 6, Hurricane Dorian made landfall on North Carolina’s Cape Hatteras.

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What is the history of hurricanes in Florida and the Carolinas?
In October 2018, Hurricane Michael hit the Florida Panhandle as the strongest storm on record to strike the region. Packing winds as high as 155 mph, the storm made landfall as a Category 5 hurricane. With no prior record of any such storm, hundreds of thousands of vulnerable children and families braced for the worst.  

Thanks to the generous support of our donors, Save the Children‘s team provided immediate support for children and families affected by Hurricane Michael.  To date, our programs for Hurricane Michael have directly served more than 25,000 children and adults.

Exactly 13 months prior, Hurricane Irma touched down on the Florida Keys. In September 2017, the Category 5 storm put more than four million children at risk in Florida alone.

This second of three major U.S. hurricanes in a month, Hurricane Irma left children and families dealing with the loss of homes and power. Schools and child-care centers closed for weeks or months.

Save the Children’s Emergency Response Team deployed to Florida before Hurricane Irma made landfall to meet children and families’ immediate needs. Through donor support, our work continues to ensure Florida kids most impacted by the storm have access to early learning services and become more resilient and ready for the next emergency.  To date, our Hurricane Irma programs have directly served more than 39,000 children and adults.

Hurricane Florence produced historic flooding in September 2018, putting Carolinas children at great risk and taking many of them from the lives they once knew. Save the Children was there before the storm made landfall, helping to meet the immediate needs of children and families in southeastern and coastal North Carolina.

Knowing that recovery can take years, Save the Children continues to partner with North Carolina’s hardest hit communities to meet children’s long-term needs.

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How does Save the Children help families and children prepare for a hurricane?
Save the Children is the only national response agency that has children at the core of everything we do.

As the national leader for children in emergencies, Save the Children works to ensure children’s unique needs are met and their voices are heard. Our team of emergency experts have taught thousands of children tips for helping to keep children and their families safe during a hurricane

Through the generous support of our donors, we help protect and keep children safe before, during and after disasters strike, and are there for kids for the long term. We help restore child care and education programs. We also work with communities, early learning networks and university partners to deliver social and emotional recovery programs, including  Journey of Hope and  HEART (Healing and Education Through the Arts), which help children and caregivers understand and cope with the stress, fear, loss and trauma that can come in the wake of a disaster.

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How is Save the Children responding to Hurricane Dorian? 
Save the Children is working with education partners in the hardest hit areas of North Carolina to help repair facilities and replace classroom materials damaged by Hurricane Dorian.

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How can I help Hurricane Dorian survivors?
A donation to the Children's Emergency Fund will help ensure children in the U.S. and around the world are protected in the aftermath of disaster, including devastating natural disasters like hurricanes. 

No one knows when the next hurricane will strike. That's why we need your support to help Save the Children provide assistance in the critical first hours and days of an emergency when children need us most.

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