Global Education Results

Every child deserves the opportunity to learn. Yet over 260 million children around the world are out of school right now, and 250 million can’t read, despite years of schooling. The world’s children deserve better. We must ensure all children learn from a quality, basic education, so they have the best chance for a bright future.

Thanks to you, Save the Children works every day to ensure children develop foundational skills in the early years, learn to read by third grade and that no child’s learning stops because they are caught up in crisis. We also help children transition to adulthood, equipping youth with critical job training and life skills. In 2018, we directly reached 8 million children through our global education programs.

Learn more about our global education programs. Read about our hunger and livelihoods programs.

14-year-old Bintou uses a colorful set of crayons she recieved from her sponsor to draw a picture on the back of her letter to her sponsor on January, 24, 2018 at her home in Kaboila, a community within the Sikasso district of Mali. Letter writing not only supports childhood literacy but also allows for children to build relationships with someone who believes in them, who believes that they can succeed. The letters children recieve from their sponsors are one of their most valued posessions. Photo credit: Victoria Zegler/Save the Children 2018. 14-year-old Bintou uses a colorful set of crayons she recieved from her sponsor to draw a picture on the back of her letter to her sponsor on January, 24, 2018 at her home in Kaboila, a community within the Sikasso district of Mali. Letter writing not only supports childhood literacy but also allows for children to build relationships with someone who believes in them, who believes that they can succeed. The letters children recieve from their sponsors are one of their most valued posessions. Photo credit: Victoria Zegler/Save the Children 2018. 14-year-old Bintou uses a colorful set of crayons she recieved from her sponsor to draw a picture on the back of her letter to her sponsor on January, 24, 2018 at her home in Kaboila, a community within the Sikasso district of Mali. Letter writing not only supports childhood literacy but also allows for children to build relationships with someone who believes in them, who believes that they can succeed. The letters children recieve from their sponsors are one of their most valued posessions. Photo credit: Victoria Zegler/Save the Children 2018. 14-year-old Bintou uses a colorful set of crayons she recieved from her sponsor to draw a picture on the back of her letter to her sponsor on January, 24, 2018 at her home in Kaboila, a community within the Sikasso district of Mali. Letter writing not only supports childhood literacy but also allows for children to build relationships with someone who believes in them, who believes that they can succeed. The letters children recieve from their sponsors are one of their most valued posessions. Photo credit: Victoria Zegler/Save the Children 2018.

Your Results: The Highlights








LET’S READ!

Mureke Dusome (“Let’s Read”) is our four-year USAID-funded project that aims to improve early literacy by fostering parent, school and community partnerships throughout Rwanda. Last year, we collaborated with world-renowned experts in children’s publishing, including publisher Penguin Random House, American illustrator Leslie Patricelli and British children’s author Tom Fletcher. In collaboration with education leaders, we developed the National Standards for Parent-School partnerships. We helped community radio stations integrate literacy content into popular series. And we helped volunteers organize weekly reading clubs and other activities.

WELL-NOURISHED YOUNG LEARNERS

In rural Malawi, local communities run about half of all preschools, providing early education and helping offset hunger with nutritious meals. In 2018, we worked with the University of Malawi’s Chancellor College, the International Food Policy Research Institute and other partners to design and pilot a cutting-edge approach to help improve these vital services, even in times of food insecurity. Because of our success, the World Bank expanded our pilot project to additional districts across Malawi.

ENCOURAGING GIRLS TO ASPIRE

Our USAID-funded Girls’ Empowerment through Education and Health (ASPIRE) project in Malawi recognized that for girls to achieve academic success, they must enter and stay in school, be learning and safe while in school, and be healthy and supported by their communities always. With our local partners, Creative Center for Community Mobilization, Forum for African Women Educationalists and the Malawi Institute of Education, we were able to get 1,800 girls re-admitted to schools, 17,600 students participating in after-school health clubs, and 24,000 students referred to youth-friendly social and health services.

EMPOWERING COCOA COMMUNITIES

In 2018, we directly reached 4.7 million vulnerable people, including 2.5 million children across 24 countries through our hunger and livelihoods programs. Our Mondelez-funded Cocoa Life program aims to build resilience in cocoa-farming communities in Indonesia. So far, we’ve reached 40,000 youth and adults. We support good agricultural practices, village savings and loan activities and cocoa-related business training. We support women’s participation in decision-making. We promote service enterprises for youth. We’re piloting an innovative block chain application for youth-run businesses. And we established 26 child protection committees to curb child labor.






















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