South Sudan

South Sudan Children

Child Hunger Crisis and Famine Relief Fund

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EMERGENCY ALERT

South Sudan is one step away from famine. 1.7 million people are currently facing emergency levels of hunger. Conflict and the worst drought in 70 years has left 20 million people in South Sudan, Somalia, Yemen and northeast Nigeria in urgent need. Save the Children in South Sudan is the lead health and nutrition provider in six of 10 states. We run 45 health centers and 58 feeding program sites for infants and young children. Learn More.

The situation is growing worse by the day – if we don’t act now, many children risk losing their lives. You can help children in South Sudan.

About South Sudan

Children in the world’s youngest nation are enduring a deepening crisis. Since the outbreak of fighting in December 2013, humanitarian needs in South Sudan have escalated to alarming levels.

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Facts About
South Sudan

More than 12.3 Million
people
live there

About 67% of girls and boys are out of school

93 out of 1000 children die
before their 5th birthday


Our Work

As health is the first step towards recovery, Save the Children manages 61 primary health care facilities with local partners. Our centers treat children with diarrhea, malaria and respiratory infections – which untreated can be life-threatening. Maternal health is supported through prenatal care, labor and delivery services and postnatal care services. We also offer preventive and public health programs including immunizations, education, hygiene and sanitation.

Our Work in
South Sudan

Last Year, Save the Children...

protected 35,137
children
from harm

supported 87,450
children
in times of crisis

provided 285,520 children
with a healthy start in life

helped 12,800 families
feed their children

gave 99,844 children
vital nourishment

Unless otherwise noted, facts and statistics have been sourced from Save the Children’s 2017 End of Childhood Report. You can access detailed data here.

Other sources as follows: Population: CIA World Factbook 2015;

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