Save the Children staff pose on the steps near the capitol in Washington, D.C. during the 2017 Save the Children Advocacy Summit. Photo credit: Susan Warner/Save the Children, March 2017.

Save the Children Action Network advocates pose on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. during the annual Advocacy Summit.

Advocacy in the U.S.

Creating Long-Lasting Change

Children are born ready to learn, but too many of the 14 million U.S. children living in poverty enter school not prepared to succeed. Kids can’t vote or influence policies that impact their lives. That’s why, together with our political advocacy arm Save the Children Action Network, we advocate for kids. Our key domestic issues include:

  • Ensuring all children in America have access to high-quality early education programs
  • Increasing funding for critical kids’ programs, like Head Start, home visiting, afterschool and summer enrichment

Since its founding in 2014, SCAN has grown into a grassroots network of more than 250,000 supporters from every state, who speak out for change and mobilize in their communities, counties and states advocating for kids.

Calling on our Leaders to Invest in Kids
Jennifer Garner, Save the Children trustee and ambassador, holds a 1-year-old girl during a visit to Hilliard Elementary School in Houston, TX. The team surveyed the damage done by Hurricane Harvey and distributed childcare supplies and educational materials to locals. Photo credit: Anthony Rathbun/Save the children, September 2017, in Houston, TX.
Jennifer Garner

“Poverty is silent. But I can’t be. With a significant investment in high-quality early childhood education – proven, effective programs like Head Start and home visitation models such as Save the Children’s Early Steps to School Success – we can intervene in these children’s lives in time to make a difference.”
– Save the Children Trustee

Mark Shriver at the Save the Children Illumination Gala 2016. Photo Credit: Save the Children 2016.
Mark Shriver

“Early childhood education is the most important economic and social justice question that our country is facing. If you look at it economically, you have folks like James Heckman, Nobel Prize-winning economist out of the University of Chicago, talking about high-quality early childhood education, 13% savings per kid per year. It’s a huge economic issue. Kids don’t vote, kids don’t give campaign contributions, and politicians don’t make them the priority they should. That’s where Save the Children and Save the Children Action Network comes in.”
– Save the Children Senior Vice President, U.S. Programs & Advocacy

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