Tsunami Ten Years On

Tsunami Ten Years On: Stories of Change

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On December 26th, 2004, an earthquake 150 miles off the coast of Indonesia triggered a massive Tsunami which devastated nearby coastal areas of Southeast and South Asia and affected countries as far away as East Africa. In total, an estimated 230,000 people were killed and 1.8 million people were displaced. In Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka and India there was widespread destruction of houses and livelihoods. The Province of Aceh bore the brunt of the disaster with 166,000 people dead or missing and more than half a million people left homeless. The response to the tsunami was one of the largest humanitarian interventions ever launched; international donors pledged $13.6 billion and in Aceh alone, up to 300 aid organizations participated in the humanitarian response.

Save the Children's Response to the Indian Ocean Tsunami

Save the Children's five-year humanitarian response represents the largest in the agency's history. Our staff members were on the ground in many coastal areas when the disaster struck, and their work has benefited an estimated 1 million people in over 1,000 towns and villages. Save the Children responded immediately in the countries hardest hit, including Indonesia, India, Sri Lanka and Thailand, as well as in Somalia. The agency provided emergency food, water and medical supplies; set up community kitchens in temporary shelters; created safe play areas and temporary classrooms for children; distributed educational materials; provided cash-for-work opportunities and offered other immediate relief activities. It also reunited more than 1,300 children with their families.

The agency provided emergency food, water and medical supplies; set up community kitchens in temporary shelters; created safe play areas and temporary classrooms for children; distributed educational materials; provided cash-for-work opportunities and offered other immediate relief activities. It also reunited more than 1,300 children with their families.

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