Save the Children Responds to Floods in Assam, India

Heavy monsoon rains in Assam State in northeastern India have created one of the biggest flood disasters in the region in more than 10 years.

The Brahmaputra River burst its banks at the end of June and flooded 27 districts in Assam, leaving more than 2 million people homeless. More than 100 people have died because of the flooding or landslides. Save the Children estimated that half of the affected population is children.

We have deployed an assessment team to Assam, which is working closely with our local partner, the Society for Social Transformation and Environment Protection (sSTEP). We worked closely with sSTEP during the 2007 Assam floods.

Children's Emergency Fund in Action

Save the Children is responding to the flooding in India — as well other severe storms, disasters and emergencies around the world. You can help us respond to floods in India, as well as other emergencies such as typhoons in Southeast Asia, drought in Africa, earthquakes in the Pacific "Ring of Fire" and other catastrophes worldwide.

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Assam Flood Response, continued

According to media reports, the flooding affected more than 2,800 villages. There has been significant damage to water supply and sanitation systems. Roads, railroads, clinics, and hospitals have also been damaged or destroyed.

The Indian government has set up more than 600 relief camps in 15 districts. The National Disaster Response Force, an arm of the Indian government, has deployed 16 teams to 13 hard-hit districts. The Indian military is also assisting displaced and 120 medical teams have been sent to the region.

Despite the swift response from local government and civil society, tens of thousands of people are still in need of help. Many areas are remote and hard to access and landslides continue to be a threat. While the rains have stopped and flood waters have receded, some tributaries of the Brahmaputra are still running dangerously high. According to media reports, the flooding affected more than 2,800 villages.

Save the Children's initial assessment found that 8 districts are seriously affected: Barpeta, Sonitpur, Jorhat, Majuli, Nalbari, Darrang, Dhemaji and Morigaon. These districts need the most assistance and should be the focus of the response. Save the Children is mobilizing personnel and funds for an initial response that will include assistance with water, sanitation and shelter.

Despite the swift response from local government and civil society, tens of thousands of people are still in need of help. Many areas are hard to access and landslides continue to be a threat. While the rains have stopped and floodwaters have receded, some tributaries of the Brahmaputra River are still running dangerously high.