Save the Children Praises Bi-partisan Efforts to Ensure Education for All

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 26, 2013) — Save the Children thanks Congress for introducing new legislation that would help boost early learning opportunities in developing countries and prevent 57 million of the most vulnerable, marginalized children, including those in conflict zones, from missing out on school.

The Education for All Act, H.R. 2780, introduced by Representatives Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Dave Reichert (R-WA), acknowledges that without basic, quality education we will lose yet another generation of children to poverty, war and disease, according to a statement by Congresswoman Lowey.

"Education offers children in some of the toughest parts of the world a chance at a brighter future. Yet millions of children living in poverty and conflict zones are robbed of the opportunity to learn and fulfill their potential," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO for Save the Children. "Save the Children applauds Representatives Lowey and Reichert for being a vital voice for these often forgotten children and calling for an investment in their futures."

If passed, this legislation would help millions more children in developing countries realize their dreams of getting an education and create a positive ripple effect on families, communities and nations overall.

More than half of the children today who are being denied the chance to go to school live in conflict-affected countries, according to Attacks on Education, a new report released this month by Save the Children in partnership with UNESCO. The new legislation would help make sure that children are still able to learn and thrive in times of crises. What's more, the bill would ensure that the youngest and most disadvantaged children, including girls living in impoverished, rural areas, as well as the disabled, orphaned, those affected by HIV/AIDS, and victims of forced labor and trafficking, are not only in school, but learning.

"As this bill implies, access to education alone is not enough," said Miles. "We need to make sure that kids in school are learning – this can make a big difference in children's lives and offer the U.S. government some of the best returns on investment."

Save the Children commends Congressional leaders for prioritizing education through this bill, just as the world's leaders are beginning to shape the next set of global development goals to be launched in 2015.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.