Save the Children’s State of the World’s Mothers Report Launched at United Nations

Save the Children’s State of the World’s Mothers Report Launched at United Nations

The launch of Save the Children's 14th annual State of the World's Mothers report at the United Nations today marked a growing global focus on newborn babies.
From left, Save the Children President & CEO Carolyn Miles, H.E. Dr. Mwaba Kasese-Bota, a UN representative from Zambia, and Dr. Joy Lawn, lead author of SOWM report, at the launch briefing of Save the Children's State of the World's Mothers Report at the United Nations.
From left, Save the Children President & CEO Carolyn Miles, H.E. Dr. Mwaba Kasese-Bota, a UN representative from Zambia, and Dr. Joy Lawn, lead author of SOWM report, at the launch briefing of Save the Children's State of the World's Mothers Report at the United Nations.

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NEW YORK (May 7, 2013) — The launch of Save the Children's 14th annual State of the World's Mothers report at the United Nations today marked a growing global focus on newborn babies. The morning event was cohosted by the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Zambia to the United Nations.

According to the new report, themed "Surviving the First Day," every year more than 1 million babies die on the day they are born, making a baby's birth day the most dangerous day of life—in the United States and almost every country in the world.

"It was here at the U.N. that all countries agreed to the Millennium Development Goal to reduce child mortality by two thirds," said Carolyn Miles , President & CEO of Save the Children. "We've come a long way, but we won't get there without new focus on saving the youngest lives. This report presents the growing evidence that the world today has the low-cost tools to prevent millions of newborn deaths once considered inevitable."

The report includes a new Birth Day Risk Index that ranks 186 countries by the chances a baby will die on the first day of life. The United States is a riskier place to be born than 68 other countries, according to the new analysis.

In addition, the report also features Save the Children's Mothers' Index. This year, it ranks Finland as the best place in the world to be a mother, and Democratic Republic of the Congo as the toughest. The United States ranks as the 30th best place to be a mother.





Speakers included:

  • Carolyn Miles, President & CEO, Save the Children
  • Professor Joy Lawn, Director, MARCH Centre, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; Senior Health Advisor to Save the Children
  • Ambassador Dr. Mwaba Kasese-Bota, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Zambia to the UN
  • Dr. Kim Eva Dickson, Senior Adviser, Maternal and Newborn Health, UNICEF
  • Catherine Ojo, Chief Nursing Officer (Registered Nurse, Registered Midwife and Paediatric Nurse), Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria

Learn more and take action at www.savethechildren.org/mothers.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.


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