2016 Press Releases

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Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Dec. 23, 2016) — As the crisis in Syria continues to deteriorate, 2016’s best soccer player, Cristiano Ronaldo, today offered the children of Syria a message of hope. Ronaldo, a Save the Children Global Artist Ambassador since 2013, told them that amidst a war entering its sixth year, they are the "true heroes," and has made a generous donation to provide immediate life-saving relief to children and families in Syria.

The donation will help Save the Children provide much-needed food, clothing, emergency medical care and psychosocial support to vulnerable children and families who have been living for years under siege and under constant bombardment.

Ronaldo shared his special message to Syrian children in a video posted on his social media channels. "This is for the children of Syria. We know that you have been suffering a lot. I am a very famous player – but you are the true heroes. Don’t lose your hope. The world is with you. We care about you. I am with you," said Ronaldo.

To view the video message, go to Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

"With our partners in Syria, we have been helping children in Aleppo and are supporting the thousands of families who have now fled their homes. Our partners are distributing food baskets and emergency supplies, and are providing medical assistance in the areas where people leaving Aleppo are arriving to, often with nothing but the clothes on their backs. And we run dozens of health centers and schools in the region. After some of the most intense violence and brutal siege we have seen in Syria’s conflict, families urgently need our help," said Nick Finney, Save the Children’s North-West Syria Country Director.

"Cristiano Ronaldo’s generous donation will help us to support children from Aleppo and across Syria, who have suffered things children should never have to live through. We are tremendously grateful for his life-changing support. Ronaldo is not only one of the world’s most iconic sports figures, but he also has become a beacon of hope for millions of boys and girls worldwide – and hope is something that Syria’s children need now more than ever."

Ronaldo has been using his voice and visibility since the Syrian conflict started to help keep the focus on children front and center, including sharing a photo of a 5-year-old Syrian refugee boy on his social channels this past March who was helped through Save the Children’s kindergarten programs.

The football star is encouraging his fans and more than 250 million social media followers to join him by sharing their own messages of hope to Syrian children on social media, using #Syria. People also can support Save the Children’s Syrian relief efforts by donating here.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Children's Emergency Fund

No one knows when or where the next crisis will occur. Help provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

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Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 23, 2016) — A large Category 3 typhoon is expected to hit the Philippines on Christmas morning, bringing severe winds, heavy rainfall, as well as potentially severe flooding and dangerously high sea levels.

Typhoon Nock-Ten is currently tracking towards the Philippine’s capital Manila from the east, and will pack winds of over 110 miles per hour, according to the Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System.

"This Christmas Day could be a bumpy one for those living in or near the path of the storm, so it’s really important communities are well prepared, especially those living in coastal areas," Save the Children Country Director in the Philippines, Ned Olney said.

"A Christmas Day typhoon is the last thing that’s needed, but storms like this are a reality for this part of the world at this time of year. It’s vital that while families are organizing their social activities, they also plan for the typhoon, which has strengthened in the past 24 hours. Save the Children teams are monitoring the storm’s progress and we are ready to respond if required."

The aid agency has large stockpiles of relief items in strategically located warehouses across the country, including thousands of emergency shelter kits, hygiene kits, water and sanitation items, and essential household items.

"We are all hoping Typhoon Nock-Ten weakens as it approaches landfall, but we are prepared for all outcomes," Olney said.

Save the Children has a long history of responding to disasters in the Philippines, including typhoons Koppu in 2015, Hagupit in 2014 and Haiyan in 2013. The aid agency has been working in the country since 1981.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Global Action Fund

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Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 20, 2016) — The Mongolian government has requested international support following two months of consistently heavy snowfall and arctic temperatures, which have sparked fears of another devastating humanitarian crisis.

Last month, two state and national agencies in Mongolia issued an emergency warning for a dzud, an extreme weather phenomenon comprising heavy snow storms and temperatures below -40 degrees Fahrenheit. Western parts of the country have already recorded temperatures as low as -68 degrees Fahrenheit, however, weather forecasters say the coldest days are still to come.

"After the devastating dzud last winter, which killed more than 1.1 million livestock, affected over 40 percent of herders and left hundreds of thousands of Mongolians living on the brink, conditions are expected to be as bad or even worse this time around," said Telmen Erdenebileg, Save the Children Mongolia’s Humanitarian Program Manager.

"We’re particularly concerned about the third of the population directly reliant on livestock as a primary source of income, especially herder households who have a small number of livestock.

"These households rely solely on animal fur for warmth, animal’s milk to stay nourished, and income from the herd to pay school fees and provide healthcare for their children. If we start seeing livestock perishing without humanitarian assistance, families will have no choice but to use coping strategies like reducing food intake, spending less on basic necessities like appropriate clothing for their children or medical care, as well as transportation and communication costs."

Mongolia’s Deputy Prime Minister Khurelsukh Ukhnaa called for international help at a special meeting with international aid agencies on Thursday, December 15, following the warning issued by the National Emergency Management Agency and National Agency for Meteorology and Environment Monitoring in November.

The Mongolian government and local authorities have been preparing for the extreme weather since the summer, including stockpiling hay and fodder, however the country’s recent economic downturn and ongoing recovery from the last dzud have hampered these preparations. Current hay and fodder stockpiles are just 50 percent of what was planned at the local district level.

"This is an extremely concerning situation and there is an urgent need for international assistance," Telmen said. "It is really important that funding targets are met now and not two or three months down the road when it is too late to prevent the greatest suffering."

Local media is reporting that more than 70 per cent of Mongolian territory is already covered with thick snow and ice. The Mongolian government has called for the donation of warm clothing, food, medication for livestock, coal, hay, animal feed, insulation materials and other useful items for herders to help them survive the winter while preventing livestock deaths.

Save the Children has been working in Mongolia since 1994. The aid organization responded to last winter’s dzud, distributing nutritious animal fodder, fuel to help hospitals run outreach programs in hard-to-reach communities, and cash grants for the most vulnerable families to buy essentials, nutritious food, and to repay any debts. We also ran education programs for the children of herder families.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syria12-21

Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 21, 2016) — A heavy snow storm has hit northwest Syria, adding to the misery for thousands of families who have recently fled East Aleppo and for civilians who remain trapped.

An estimated 26,000 people have arrived in rural Aleppo and Idlib over the last few days, often with little more than the clothes on their backs, and many are now sleeping in unheated buildings or tents as temperatures drop below freezing. The thousands of young children and babies among them are extremely vulnerable, particularly as many children are weakened and malnourished after months under siege without proper food—aid hasn’t been able to reach Aleppo since July. Aid workers report that children have been separated from their parents in the chaos as they run to get food when they get off the buses.

Fears are rising for the people still trapped in East Aleppo as the weather worsens. Families have reportedly been staying in the streets or in bombed out buildings while they wait for evacuation with no fuel, medical care or food. Negotiations are ongoing to complete the evacuation from both East Aleppo and the besieged Idlib villages of Fuaa and Kefraya, but it appears snow may be impacting their movement.

The snow storm is also hampering the relief effort in Idlib – Save the Children partners say relief trucks and ambulances carrying patients who have been waiting for days for treatment are getting stuck on the roads. One 5-month-old girl arrived at a hospital supported by Syria Relief this morning with two broken legs, a broken arm and an open wound in her stomach – she had been waiting 10 days for treatment after being trapped under siege in East Aleppo. Her parents had been killed and her two injured siblings were taken to another hospital.

"Save the Children’s partners are working around the clock in sub-zero temperatures doing a heroic job to help families who are arriving from East Aleppo," said Nick Finney, Save the Children’s Northwest Syria Country Director. "The needs are huge – thousands of children have arrived in the last few days hungry, cold and terrified after months under siege and bombing. They need food, a place to stay, medical treatment, and in the longer term, help to return to school and to recover from their experiences.

"We shouldn’t be celebrating what’s happened here as a success. These families have been forced from their homes after unimaginable suffering and are now staying in tents and abandoned buildings in a snow storm, in an area which was already overwhelmed with displaced people. We need support from the international community to help these children survive the winter and recover, but we also need to ensure this tragedy never happens again. We are already hearing reports that an additional 1,500 people are going to be forcibly displaced from the besieged town of Madaya and sent to Idlib."

Dr. Mounir Hakimi, chairman of Save the Children’s partner Syria Relief, added: "In the last three days, we have received 30 severely injured children at a hospital we are supporting. Many of the cases we’re seeing are of infections from wounds which couldn’t be treated properly under siege, so often we’re having to amputate limbs that can no longer be saved. At the reception points, people coming off the buses were starving and exhausted—I never thought people would be so desperate just to eat a biscuit. We need more blankets and food supplies, but the snow is also going to make our work very difficult in the coming days."

Save the Children has also been working with a local charity called Violet, in Idlib, where the families from Aleppo are being taken. "At the meeting point where buses come in from Aleppo, children were in total shock as they saw the fruit and cooked meals being distributed. Many ran off the buses leaving their parents behind to take an apple or a banana. This has caused children to be separated from their families in the chaos, but some of them hadn’t seen a piece of fruit in five or six months, and malnutrition was clear on all their faces, even the adults’," said Muslem Essa, an aid worker with Violet. "The children had gone hungry for days waiting for evacuation and they were exhausted, sick and obviously traumatized. Their faces and hands were totally black, covered with coal dust as for the last week they were burning furniture or anything they could find for heating."

Save the Children is urging international UN monitors to enter East Aleppo within the next 24 hours and oversee the evacuation of the remaining civilians, ensuring that the most vulnerable and hardest to reach – the sick, elderly and children – are able to leave. We are also calling for an end to siege tactics across Syria. As we come to the close of 2016, nearly 750,000 people are still living under siege in Syria, facing a winter without sufficient food, fuel or medical care.

Save the Children is providing food baskets, cash grants, blankets and emergency kits to thousands of newly displaced families from East Aleppo. In addition, the organization has sent extra supplies to health facilities and schools to meet the increased demand. Individuals can contribute to Save the Children’s response in Syria by visiting: www.savethechildren.org/syria-donate.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Yemen PR

Children's Emergency Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 20, 2016) — Yemen’s health system is on the brink of collapse, according to a new briefing by Save the Children, which includes interviews with doctors and parents in the war-ravaged country. Struggling to Survive: Stories from Yemen’s Collapsing Health System shows child mortality rates are increasing. At least 1,219 children have died as a direct result of the fighting but a chronic lack of medical supplies and staff are causing an additional 10,000 preventable deaths per year, described in the briefing as the "invisible causalities of Yemen’s war."

More than 270 health facilities have been damaged as a result of the conflict and recent estimates suggest that more than half of 3,500 assessed health facilities are now closed or only partially functioning. This has left 8 million children without access to basic healthcare, according to the UN.[1]

There are also critical shortages of qualified staff throughout the country, with many doctors and staff either leaving Yemen or forced to flee their homes and being internally displaced.

"Even before the war tens of thousands of Yemeni children were dying of preventable causes. But now, the situation is much worse and an estimated 1,000 children are dying every week from preventable killers like diarrhea, malnutrition and respiratory tract infections," said Edward Santiago, Save the Children’s Yemen Country Director.

"With parents losing their jobs and livelihoods owing to the chaos of war, many told us they have to sell belongings like jewelry, vehicles, gas canisters and land just to be able to afford the trip to hospital while others have taken out loans. Once there, they often can’t afford the cost of the medicines their children urgently need while many other parents find the facility just does not have life-saving medicines."

Hilel Mohammed al-Bahri, Deputy Manager of Al-Sabeen Hospital in Sana’a, has seen a 300 percent increase in the price of most medicines since the war began in March 2015 making treatment unaffordable to the hospitals and most families.

"We have a lack of medicine and salary for doctors and employees," al-Bahri said. "We count on income from the patients who pay small fees. But if we need maintenance or a spare part for our hospital equipment, we don't have the money. We don't have parts for devices because of the blockade. We can only put babies younger than nine months old in the ICU. We don't have room for the older babies. We have only 20 beds for ICU units yet we are the only children's hospital in the area."

With increasing need but few beds and incubators, many babies and children are being turned away from facilities or, as in Al-Sabeen Hospital, are being placed with highly infectious conditions like measles in the same open wards as non-infected children because the hospital lacks space and equipment for an isolation unit.

Save the Children is responding to this dire humanitarian crisis by supporting 60 health facilities with essential equipment, medicine and training across the country. The organization also runs mobile medical teams that provide life-saving nutrition interventions; its programs to support the crumbling health sector have reached 400,000 people this year, more than half of whom are children.

Save the Children is calling upon parties to the conflict to remove all obstacles to the import of essential commercial and humanitarian supplies and to allow rapid and unimpeded humanitarian access throughout Yemen. All parties should also respect their obligations under international humanitarian and human rights law and take immediate measures to prevent and end grave violations against children. These include the killing and maiming of children, attacks on hospitals and recruitment and exploitation by fighting forces.

[1] UNOCHA Humanitarian Needs Overview

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Supplies and Staff Prepositioned to Help Families Being Evacuated

Eastern Aleppo

Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 15, 2016) — As the delayed evacuation from the remaining opposition-held part of Aleppo appears to have begun, Save the Children is urging the immediate transfer of injured and orphaned/separated children to safe areas.

Save the Children has pre-positioned supplies and staff in some of the areas where families are being brought, including 10,000 food baskets and 30,000 medical kits, and 600 household kits.

Thousands of children are believed to be trapped in East Aleppo, a significant number of whom need urgent medical treatment after being injured or suffering illnesses which can’t be treated in the besieged area. Our partners reported that during the intense escalation in violence following the collapse of the ceasefire yesterday, dozens of injured children were arriving at the remaining hospitals which didn’t have the means to treat them.

Save the Children’s partners in the area report that many children have either been orphaned or separated from their families in the chaos of the recent military advances. Children on their own are incredibly vulnerable in this context.

"Children in East Aleppo are injured, distressed, malnourished and weak. They are hiding during the day from the ongoing attacks and facing below freezing temperatures at night, with no fuel to keep warm," said Nick Finney, Save the Children’s North-West Syria Country Director. "They must be evacuated today, without any further delays, to areas where we can reach them with aid and support."

Among those waiting for evacuation are around 300 humanitarian workers from Save the Children’s partners, who are still trapped in the siege with their families.

Witnesses also reported the use of deadly cluster bombs on Wednesday morning, which Save the Children has previously warned disproportionately kill and maim children.

Rami,* an aid worker with our partner organization Shafak, said yesterday that the damaged medical facilities were crowded with women and children. He told us that patients are arriving with complicated injuries, and are unable to be treated.

Rami* said: "Everyone is attending to women and children. The medics are receiving children injured with the cluster bomb shrapnel. The hospital can do nothing. They are totally paralyzed under these circumstances.

"The hospital has five people with abdominal injuries in need of operations, two others need vascular operations, five need orthopedic surgery and seven need neural operations. Most of them are dying because the doctors can’t look after them. Right now there are seven surviving on one manual ventilator because there is no oxygen."

"There have been many painful setbacks in Aleppo, resulting in death and suffering at each turn for civilians, but today there may be a ray of hope," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children’s President and CEO. "Children, the injured and aid workers of Aleppo cannot wait any longer. We must safely evacuate the remaining civilians immediately. Battlefields are no place for children. The protection of civilians and humanitarian aid cannot be used as a bargaining chip in political or military negotiations."

Individuals can contribute to Save the Children’s response in Syria by visiting: www.savethechildren.org/syria-donate.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Child Refugee Crisis Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 14, 2016) —Thousands of people are at risk this winter as the EU-Turkey deal keeps refugees and migrants stuck in dangerous and degrading conditions in Greece, a coalition of more than 20 humanitarian agencies and human rights organizations warns. The organizations, most of which work with migrants in Greece, warn that men, women and children could die because of worsening winter conditions. EU leaders meeting in Brussels on Thursday to discuss migration need to take urgent action to improve the situation on the ground and save lives.

In a joint statement to European heads of state and government, the 21 organizations including Save the Children, Oxfam, Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and the International Rescue Committee outline the horrendous situation faced by people who have reached Greek shores seeking safety and dignity. Despite overcrowding and rapidly deteriorating conditions, refugees and migrants are not being transferred from the islands because EU governments fear they will not be able to deport people from the Greek mainland to Turkey under the deal signed in March.

Thousands of people have been trapped for months in camps that are ill-equipped for long-term stays, especially in winter. Many, including children and babies, are living in freezing cold tents and even on beaches, where they struggle to stay dry as temperatures drop and storms grow more ferocious.

Only three weeks ago, a 6-year-old child and her grandmother died when their tent in the Moria ‘hotspot’ on the island of Lesbos caught on fire, because the cold forced them to cook inside. In another case, a family suffered carbon monoxide poisoning after they were not given a heater and had to procure their own.

Many refugees and other migrants, including children, are immediately detained before they can even request asylum, which is a violation of their rights. Families are being broken apart in the process of relocation, or when only some members are granted family reunification. Asylum procedures are slow and unnecessarily complicated. The relocation mechanism is slow, difficult to navigate and excludes many people.

European leaders need to take immediate action to improve the situation, and they have the power to do so, the organizations said.

"The crisis in Greece is completely avoidable. EU leaders have many tools at their disposal, including relocation and family reunification for the thousands of refugees with parents, siblings and other family members already in other parts of Europe," said Imogen Sudbery, Head of the Brussels Office of the International Rescue Committee. "The question is, do EU leaders have the common strength and humanity to put these tools to use?"

"Politics and bureaucracy must not be allowed to get in the way of helping children and families escape the oppression and violence they have experienced in their home countries and find safety and a better life," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "Leaders can do better and they must."

"The EU-Turkey deal has manifestly failed the men, women and children who came to Europe in search of sanctuary," said Iverna McGowan, Director of the Amnesty International European Institutions Office. "This deal which ignores and – even worse – causes suffering and human rights abuses must not become a blueprint for others."

The NGOs also warned European governments against replicating the EU-Turkey deal with other countries under the ‘partnership framework’ with African governments. The overarching aim of these deals is to keep migrants away from Europe.

At Thursday’s EU summit, European leaders have the opportunity to address the dire situation for migrants on Greek islands. EU leaders need to urgently take the following steps, the coalition of humanitarian agencies and human rights organizations said:

Prioritize the immediate transfer of people from overcrowded sites on the islands to locations on the mainland that meet European law standards for reception, rather than pressuring Greek authorities to keep people on islands in substandard conditions.

Redouble efforts to take asylum seekers out of first countries of arrival, including Greece, by enabling swift and efficient access to family reunification, relocation and a secure refugee status; it is imperative to start with the most vulnerable groups, irrespective of their nationality, and give people better information and support when selecting the destination country.

Ensure that every person has access to protection and to a fair and efficient asylum process; the desire to speed up processes cannot come at the expense of access to asylum.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Nearly half of returnee children out of school while mass return mounts pressure on health services, food and water supplies

Afghan PR

Global Action Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD. Conn. (December 13, 2016) — New data from Save the Children reveals an alarming education crisis in Afghanistan, as 3,000 Afghans are repatriated daily from Pakistan, following a tightening in regulations by Pakistani authorities.

More than 70 percent of returnee parents and community leaders who took part in an education survey compiled by Save the Children said early marriage and child labor were major risks faced by repatriated children currently not in school.

With lack of documentation, money and access identified as major barriers for schoolchildren, parents who are facing poverty often feel the only stable choice they can make is to arrange a marriage for their child or enter them into the workforce early.

"Part of the problem is that many repatriated families left stable jobs and lives in Pakistan and are now watching the few savings they have dwindle away knowing they have little prospect of income. Many are living out in the open, or in tents, so have no real semblance of shelter let alone security," said Ana Locsin, Save the Children Country Director in Afghanistan.

"They often feel they have little choice but to send their child to find work or to marry off their daughters."

Almost half of returnee children are not currently enrolled in school, according to the data, which was compiled through hundreds of in-depth interviews with returnee parents and community leaders.

Child marriage was the most common risk to children not attending school, the data identified, followed by child labor, then neglect or exploitation. About a third of survey respondents felt that land mines or unexploded devices could impact children who aren’t attending school, while one in six identified recruitment into armed forces or groups as a likely risk.

"Unless we can deal with these issues swiftly, a large number of Afghan children who’ve just had their lives uprooted could find themselves missing out on their education entirely. The longer they are away from the classroom, the less likely they will ever go back," Locsin said.

"The population of Nangarhar is exploding and the health system is under enormous pressure. It’s only set to get worse as more Afghans are forced back from Pakistan."

More than 650,000 Afghans have already returned from Pakistan this year alone, with the majority planning to stay in the more temperate border province of Nangarhar, at least until the end of winter. Hundreds of thousands more Afghans are expected to repatriate in the coming months.

"It’s extremely concerning to see tens of thousands of people sleeping out in the open, in tents or in damp, overcrowded shelters that don’t meet minimum emergency shelter standards. These are families with young children and babies who now face plummeting winter temperatures that are putting lives at risk," Locsin added.

The rapidly escalating humanitarian crisis comes amid a surge of violence across Afghanistan in 2016, a year in which more than 2,500 civilians were killed by conflict in the first nine months and over half a million were displaced. The UN has said up to 900,000 Afghans could be returned from Pakistan by the end of the year.

Save the Children is supporting repatriated Afghans in Nangarhar and other provinces, distributing cash so families can buy food, water and other basic essentials.

The aid agency is aiming to reach 100,000 returnees over the next 12 months, repairing shelters, providing psychosocial support to children through special child friendly spaces, supporting children to get back to school and distributing basic household items like cooking equipment, soaps, towels and warm clothes.

Afghans have been seeking refuge in Pakistan since the Soviet war in Afghanistan in the 1980s. In 2015 UNHCR estimated there were about 1.5 million Afghans living in Pakistan.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

 

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (December 14, 2016) — Thousands of children are believed to be trapped in East Aleppo, many reportedly in the besieged area without their parents, having been orphaned or separated from their families, and are facing an ongoing threat of death or injury, as they try to hide from constant attack.

Save the Children is receiving gravely concerning information from partners as artillery fire and airstrikes resumed in East Aleppo this morning, hours after the proposed ceasefire collapsed. Our contacts report that more than 100 shells fell over the area this morning with witnesses also reporting the use of deadly cluster bombs.

Speaking from East Aleppo today, Abu Rajab, a doctor told us: “The agreement has been broken. Hundreds of shells fell on us. It’s a dire medical situation. There are no ambulances. People are bleeding to death in the streets.”

Rami*, an aid worker with Shafak, our partner organization working in the remains of the last medical facility in East Aleppo, told us that the damaged facilities were crowded with women and children. He told us that patients are arriving with complicated injuries, and are unable to be treated.

“Everyone is attending to women and children. They (medics) are receiving children injured by the cluster shrapnel. The hospital can do nothing. They are totally paralyzed under these circumstances” Rami* said.

“The hospital has five people with abdominal injuries in need of operations, two others need vascular operations, five need orthopaedic surgery and seven need neural operations. Most of them are dying because the doctors can’t look after them. Right now there are seven surviving on one manual ventilator because there is no oxygen.”

The number of people injured today is impossible to count, with families reportedly hiding wherever they can and medics unable to get outside to treat casualties because of the intense attacks. Our contacts have confirmed that planes have been circling the area, with growing concerns that airstrikes will continue.

“We expect a number of children to have been injured or killed in today’s shelling, particularly given the use of cluster bombs which we know will have a devastating impact, in an increasingly compact area,” said Nick Finney, Save the Children’s North-West Syria Country Director. “This morning should have been the start of medical casualties coming out of East Aleppo to receive vital treatment and for children and other civilians to be given safe passage to other areas. Instead the number of children desperate for treatment is increasing by the hour.”

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on



Iglesias’ Microsoft Software Donation Strengthens Save the Children’s Literacy Programs for Elementary School-Age Children in Latin America; Guatemalan Students Present Pop Star with Handmade Book

Enrique PR
International pop star Enrique Iglesias talks with, from left, Henely, Juana, Gerson and Julio, before his Dec. 9 concert in Guatemala City, Guatemala. The kids, who all participate in Save the Children’s Literacy Boost program in Guatemala, created a handmade book as a thank you gift for Iglesias. Photo: Susan Warner, Save the Children

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (Dec. 13, 2016) – Right before performing in front of thousands in Guatemala last week, Grammy Award-winning artist Enrique Iglesias received a surprise holiday gift backstage from some of his littlest local fans. The international pop star, through a partnership with Microsoft, just donated $200,000 in software to Save the Children to strengthen its literacy programming for elementary school-age children in El Salvador, Guatemala and Peru, and the kid fans from Guatemala’s remote mountainous region of Quiche wanted to thank him in their own words at the Dec. 9 concert.

Their gift -- a handmade book – is a collection of hand-written stories and colorful drawings that they created through Save the Children’s literacy program called Literacy Boost. The stories describe local traditions around holidays like Guatemala’s Independence Day and Christmas.

"I am honored to receive such an original and creative gift. As a songwriter, words and story-telling have always had a special meaning to me. Through this donation, I hope more children will be able to share in my passion," said Iglesias.

In Guatemala, nearly 1 in three kids does not complete elementary school1. Many children, lacking the basic skills to read and write, struggle in school and eventually drop out. Literacy Boost helps kids learn to read early on, by training teachers in effective classroom techniques, inspiring parents to support their children’s learning and create books with locally available materials, and offering reading camps and a reading buddy program for kids, which encourages them to read at home.

"Going to school is not enough to ensure learning. Some children – those who are indigenous and do not know the national language, kids living in extreme poverty, girls and those with few books or no one to read to them at home – need an extra boost to gain basic reading skills," said Mary McInerney, Save the Children’s country director in Guatemala. "The gap in reading ability between strong and struggling readers widens with age. That is why it is critically important that children learn to read in the early grades, so that they can then read to learn."

McInerny added, "We are tremendously grateful for Enrique’s donation to our Literacy Boost program. It will help the teachers improve their lesson plans and create learning materials, such as stories for the kids to read during reading camp with their reading buddies."

The donated software also will be used to support a food program funded by USDA called IDEA, which provides nutritious food and education on good eating habits to children in Save the Children-supported schools.

With their gift to Iglesias, the Guatemalan children wanted to welcome the international pop star to their country.

"We want to share something from our communities, and thank him for his support," said 9-year-old Juana.

"His support motivates us to stay in school and reach our dreams," said 9-year-old Henely.

Literacy Boost is helping kids learn to read in 24 countries around the world, including El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti and Peru in Latin America and the Caribbean

.

Teaming up with Save the Children last fall, Iglesias also launched a #Hearts4Kids T-shirt to support the non-profit’s humanitarian responses around the globe.

1 UNESCO Global Education Monitoring Report, Education for people and planet: Creating sustainable futures for all, 2016.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

 

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (December 13, 2016) — In response to the latest bombardment and civilian targeting in East Aleppo, Nick Finney, Save the Children’s North-West Syria Country Director, says:

"We are desperately worried for the fate of children, aid workers, and other civilians trapped in East Aleppo. Our partners in Syria have at least 300 humanitarian staff in the city still, living under intense bombardment with their families but fearing they will be arrested or killed if they try to leave. Hundreds of children are also believed to still be in the middle of this battlefield with their parents, or alone if they have been orphaned by the bombing. With no ambulances, food or medical facilities, the situation is catastrophic and has been for months. People’s worst fears of revenge attacks appear to have become reality – the UN says it has confirmed that 82 civilians, including 13 children, have been shot at close range and there are "numerous" bodies lying in the street.

"The warring parties are ultimately responsible for civilian deaths and suffering. But the international community, in particular the five permanent members of the Security Council, also bear a grave responsibility for what is happening in Aleppo. We have utterly failed to protect civilians, including brave humanitarians who have continued to serve their community despite their own homes being destroyed and their children going to bed hungry every night. Families who are desperate to leave are being shown no dignity or humanity. We must at least now end this carnage and safely evacuate the remaining civilians. That should be done through internationally monitored safe routes which give people the option of going to opposition held areas."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on



Evans Visited Bulgari-Funded Save the Children Program That So Far Has Reached 155,000 Children Across 245 Schools

Media Contact
Jordyn Linsk 475.999.3116

Fairfield, CONN. (Dec. 12, 2016) — What if one holiday purchase could help change the world? Could help boost a child’s access to education? Well, in fact it can. Actor and Bulgari Ambassador Luke Evans, recently visited India to see first-hand how the purchase of a Bulgari ring, necklace or bracelet designed for Save the Children directly impacts kids in need.

Since 2009, Save the Children and Bulgari have partnered to raise over $50 million globally through the sale of the Save the Children jewelry collection inspired by the iconic B.zero1 line. The money raised has enabled the delivery of over 100 education programs in 33 countries, and has reached over one million children.

Evans, whose Hollywood blockbusters include The Hobbit, The Girl on the Train and the highly anticipated Beauty and the Beast, sat in on a reading class in an education program in Pune funded through the Bulgari partnership. He also engaged with parents and siblings who help their little loved one improve their reading skills outside of school.

With India having the highest number of out-of-school children in the world, Save the Children, with support from Bulgari, is working to give more Indian children the opportunity to go to school, stay in school and get a better education. Thanks to Bulgari, Save the Children has been able to reach nearly 155,000 children across 245 schools – ensuring they receive a quality education and have the best start in life.

Evans also visited an alternative education program for children who live, and often work, on the streets in Mumbai, with little opportunity to go to school. Almost two thirds of the families live in informal slums or squatter colonies. Save the Children works in 10 slums on the outskirts of the Deonar garbage dump – the biggest landfill in Mumbai where the mountains of trash stand more than 65 feet tall.

Here, Evans met young children who spend their days salvaging scraps and other recyclables from the nearby landfill to resell. But they also get an opportunity to learn through a Save the Children-supported mobile learning center. Every day, a school bus that has been converted into a classroom arrives at the slum to provide books and learning activities.

"It’s wrong that there are children growing up today who will never read a book, never write a letter or do basic math," said Evans. "I visited one of the most deprived slum communities in Mumbai, where many children don’t get the chance to go to school. It was heartbreaking to see the terrible conditions that these children live in – the extreme levels of poverty in India have been totally shocking to me."

Since the program began in November 2013, more than 2,500 children have participated in the informal learning center with many children having transitioned and enrolled in a formal school.

Added Evans, "Seeing the impact that Save the Children’s programs are having on the lives of these children is incredible. To see the smiles on their faces when they read and write and know that they’ll have a better life as a result is amazing. I’m so proud to support Save the Children and be an Ambassador for Bulgari – their partnership is making such a big difference to these children’s lives. My visit to India will stay with me forever."

Earlier this year, Evans participated in Bulgari’s #RaiseYourHand campaign, created by photographer Fabrizio Ferri, to benefit Save the Children. Evans joined Meg Ryan and Naomi Watts, among others, in wearing a black and silver ceramic bracelet – the newest addition to Bulgari’s Save the Children jewelry collection – in a stunning series of photos and films.

You can add the bracelet or the entire Save the Children jewelry line to your shopping list and join Evans in making a difference for disadvantaged children this holiday season. Visit http://www.bulgari.com/en-us/save-the-children.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Aceh_PR

Children's Emergency Fund

No one knows when or where the next crisis will occur. Help provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 9, 2016) — An education crisis is emerging among communities affected by Wednesday’s deadly 6.4 magnitude earthquake in Aceh, Indonesia, Save the Children’s partner organization Yayasan Sayangi Tunas Cilik (YSTC) is warning.

In Pidie Jaya district, one of the two worst affected, an estimated 25 to 30 percent of schools have been damaged, with at least seven schools totally destroyed.

"With so many aftershocks occurring, we’re afraid that a particularly strong tremor might be enough to bring down a classroom that has already been damaged by the initial earthquake," YSTC Humanitarian Manager Ronald Sianipar said.

"We’re seeing a lot of classrooms with large cracking in the walls, and until they can be repaired and their structural integrity restored, they are not fit for use. This means thousands of children are indefinitely out school, which will have a huge impact on their recovery and wellbeing.

"When school buildings are safe, we know they are the best place for students to be following a disaster like this. It creates a sense of normality and safety and supports children’s emotional recovery."

YSTC’s earthquake response will focus heavily on education, including finding alternative classrooms for schools and setting up temporary classrooms.

The organization will also establish a "child friendly space", so children have a place to be safe and engage in educational play while their parents start the recovery process.

"We cannot underestimate the importance of education and emotional support for children after such a distressing event, particularly in an area that was so badly affected by the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami," Sianipar added.

"A lot of people here are feeling traumatized and distressed, especially given that this earthquake occurred so close to the coastline. People are afraid of another tsunami."

YSTC has deployed humanitarian personnel from Jakarta and is carrying out damage assessments to determine where it will respond. Shelter, education and hygiene kits are also on hand if required.

Save the Children mounted one of the largest humanitarian recovery efforts in Aceh following the 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami and along with many others groups have spent a decade investing in the region to better prepare them for natural disasters.

"On a pleasing note, it was great to see one of the schools Save the Children built after 2004 still standing and undamaged following this earthquake," Sianipar said.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Children's Emergency Fund

No one knows when or where the next crisis will occur. Help provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 9, 2016) — A powerful 7.7 magnitude earthquake struck just off the coast of the Solomon Islands on Friday, causing severe shaking in many parts of the country but the worst of the damage is still unknown.

"It was extremely scary, I’ve never felt anything like this," said John Lilo, Save the Children’s Acting Country Director in the Solomon Islands.

"The shaking lasted for about 15 seconds and I thought our whole house was going to collapse. Thankfully it didn’t and there are few reports of damage here in Honiara.

"However, this was a massive earthquake and the whole country is on alert for further aftershocks. We have yet to confirm reports from the worst hit areas, but early information suggests there has been some damage to homes in the regions closest to the epicenter."

The Solomon Islands government is carrying out assessment flights to determine which communities have been worst affected. Save the Children humanitarian personnel are ready to respond if required.

"We know from our experience in previous emergencies that children will be the most vulnerable and could face serious protection and psychological threats," Lilo said.

"The Solomon Islands government and agencies like Save the Children have put considerable effort into building a robust disaster preparedness and response system for the country. This machinery is now being activated.

"We have a strong team on the ground and we know the country well. We have also put specialist teams on standby at the international level and if necessary, they will be deployed."

Save the Children has had a dedicated team of staff in the Solomon Islands since 1986 delivering essential child protection, health, education and disaster risk reduction programs.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Children's Emergency Fund

No one knows when or where the next crisis will occur. Help provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 7, 2016) — Indonesian authorities and aid agencies, including Yayasan Sayangi Tunas Cilik, the local partner of Save the Children in Indonesia, are assessing the humanitarian impact after a strong magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck northern Sumatra on Wednesday morning.

"The earthquake was relatively shallow and has caused some buildings to collapse, and damaged homes and other infrastructure, which may result in further challenges in delivering aid," said Selina Sumbung, Chairperson of Yayasan Sayangi Tunas Cilik.

"However it’s still too early to know exactly how severe the humanitarian impact will be. Our teams are currently assessing the situation and we stand ready to respond if required."

Save the Children, through Yayasan Sayangi Tunas Cilik, is in contact with the National Disaster Management Authority and will work together to support affected communities, especially children.

"We’re particularly concerned about the impact on children. Earthquakes can be extremely frightening, and children’s psychosocial wellbeing will be an important part of the recovery process," Sumbung said.

Save the Children has a long history working in Sumatra, in particular following the 2004 tsunami, and has stockpiled ready-to-deploy relief items including thousands of shelter kits, hygiene kits and jerry cans, as well as child-friendly spaces and education kits.

"We are working to make sure that no child is left behind, here in Pidie or at any other area in Indonesia," Sumbung added.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Nigeria-PR2

Global Action Fund

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 2, 2016) — As humanitarian donors prepare to gather in Geneva, award-winning British-Nigerian actor David Oyelowo has joined Nigerian luminaries and international aid organizations in writing an open letter warning global leaders of the tens of thousands of children who could starve in North East Nigeria unless the world acts immediately.

Oyelowo is joining Aliko Dangote, one of Africa’s leading businessmen, U2’s Bono and Save the Children in demanding decisive action to address the crisis when the donors meet to agree world-wide humanitarian emergency funding in Geneva next week.

Oyelowo, who was raised in Lagos and London, co-writes in the letter: "The tragedy now unfolding in North East Nigeria is one of the world’s deadliest but least reported emergencies.

"Over 4.7 million people are in need of food assistance and some 400,000 children are at imminent risk of starvation. It must be addressed when humanitarian emergency donors gather this week in Geneva."

An appeal by Nigeria as part of the UN’s global Humanitarian Response Plan is announced today in Abuja, as Save the Children’s new report on North East Nigeria ‘Children’s Lives and Futures at Risk’ warns of a threat of full-scale famine.

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network estimates that more than 65,000 people are in famine conditions[1]. Fourteen million people are in need of humanitarian assistance, according to the UN.

"North East Nigeria is teetering on the brink of famine. The UN estimates that 75,000 children could die over the next year from malnutrition: that’s as many as 205 children who could die every day," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children.

"There is still a window of opportunity to prevent a full-blown famine – but that window is closing fast. Failure to act would be indefensible and unforgivable."

Among other interventions, Save the Children and ONE are calling for innovative financing opportunities to ensure the UN appeal is fully funded. Today’s report from Save the Children highlights that large sums of illicit finance from Nigeria are laundered through banks and the property markets in the United Kingdom.

It has been recently agreed that criminal assets stolen from Nigeria and seized in the UK can now be returned to Nigeria, with the Nigerian government pledging to use any returned funds to benefit the poorest.

"The international aid response for 2016 has been inadequate," Miles added. "Save the Children is calling on all OECD countries to donate much needed funds, and for the Nigerian government to immediately use these for the humanitarian response."

As the Nigerian army continues its advance into insurgent strongholds in areas bordering Niger, Chad and Cameroon, it is almost inevitable that more humanitarian suffering will be revealed. The conflict has been characterized by systematic, widespread and grave violation of children’s rights. Killing, abductions and sexual abuse, and the forced recruitment into militias has been tragically commonplace. Many children have witnessed atrocities first-hand, or have themselves been subject to attacks, and are in desperate need of psychosocial support.

Three teenage brothers captured and imprisoned for three months told Save the Children staff during a counselling session for displaced children:

"The day our village was attacked, our teacher was with us. They cut off our teacher’s head with a sword. They killed our parents. They dropped them in a well. They told us to stop crying or we will also be killed. We heard the voices of our parents screaming inside our heads."

Save the Children has already witnessed the deadly effects of a delayed international response. As the crisis has intensified, it has established seven outpatient therapeutic-feeding sites and an emergency unit to which children with life threatening malnutrition can be referred for treatment. Children referred to the center display the classic symptoms of Kwashiorkor (lack of protein leading to fluid-retention), Marasmus (energy deficiency) and extreme hunger, with distended stomachs, pencil thin limbs, loss of hair, acute anemia and severe skin conditions. Most arrive with complicating conditions, including diarrhea and pneumonia.

Many of the children being treated have been carried or walked for between three days and two weeks from areas like Mafa and Konduga. One mother in Save the Children’s emergency feeding clinic in Maiduguri told of how her husband, uncle and three children were beheaded in front of her. Another described sometimes going for five days without food.

Another concern, widely voiced by parents in Save the Children clinics, is that children leaving the stabilization clinic are returning to an environment marked by extreme poverty, rising food prices, and little or no support.

[1] For the UN to officially declare a famine, three important conditions must be met. First, 20 per cent of the population must have fewer than 2100 kilocalories of food available per day. Secondly, more than 30 per cent of children must be acutely malnourished. And finally, two deaths per day in every 10,000 people – or four deaths per day in every 10,000 children – must be being caused by lack of food.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (December 2, 2016) — Save the Children is urgently calling for safe routes out of opposition-held areas of East Aleppo for families who wish to leave, after dozens of people were killed trying to flee.

Our partners in the besieged city say the situation is desperate, with constant bombardment, no proper shelter for newly displaced families and almost no food or fuel. Children are vulnerable and exposed in the middle of a battlefield. There are reports of people packing what they can carry and going to the frontlines on foot to try to get out, but this is extremely dangerous.

In the midst of the chaos children are being separated from their parents and people are being killed and injured as they venture out into the open under heavy airstrikes. In the last couple of days, at least 70 people have reportedly been killed[1] as they tried to cross the frontline, many of them children.

Safe routes out of the besieged city can and must be set up during a pause in hostilities. All sides in the fighting have an obligation to allow civilians to leave safely and without fear of reprisal. Movement along these routes should be entirely voluntary and established and monitored by the UN and International Committee of the Red Cross.

"The first priority remains ending the violence and getting help into people in East Aleppo. Families should not be forced to leave their homes and communities under the threat of bombs and starvation," said Sonia Khush, Save the Children’s Syria Director. "The reality however is that international aid has not been allowed in to the city for almost five months, and conditions have become so desperate that people are taking deadly risks to flee under fire and cross frontlines into an uncertain fate."

"More children are going to die trying to reach safety in the coming days if we do not urgently establish safe, internationally monitored routes. The world has utterly failed the children of East Aleppo, but the warring parties have an obligation to protect them now in their hour of greatest need."

Civilians in the opposition-held part of the city are understandably nervous to enter territory controlled by government forces and their allies, who have been besieging them for months. There have been unconfirmed reports of young men being separated from their families as they leave and either detained or forced to join the military.

Safe passage should therefore be granted for civilians who wish to travel to areas not under government control. Save the Children has pre-positioned supplies in those areas ready to help displaced families, including food rations and emergency health kits.

Save the Children asks all governments with influence over the parties to the conflict, and particularly the Russian government, to immediately implement a 72-hour pause in fighting to allow safe routes to be set up and allow aid in to the remaining population. They must also end the appalling attacks on civilians and civilian infrastructure, including hospitals and schools, which have characterized this conflict.

[1] Source: OCHA Aleppo situation report

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (November 29, 2016) — In a little over 36 hours, the latest assault on East Aleppo has displaced thousands of people and cornered some 250,000 in the last opposition-held area of the city as the Syrian army and its allies have taken key district, after key district. Up to 100,000 children are unable to escape the destruction.

"With so many people trapped in an ever-shrinking space, children can be little more than sitting targets for bombs," said Sonia Khush, Save the Children's Syria Director. "We are hearing that things are so bad that many families fear they will not live through the night."

Those who have fled into the last remaining portion of opposition-held Aleppo have been displaced into a scene of utter devastation where existing residents have already been living in the streets for weeks, amid dilapidated buildings and without adequate food or shelter.

Our Syrian partners working in East Aleppo tell us that thousands of people, including many children, have now been made homeless and left with nowhere to run or hide as the Syrian army continues to push ahead with its offensive.

"We are hearing reports that dozens of families have been moved to recently captured areas of East Aleppo although all contact with the families has since been lost," Khush said.

"We are extremely worried about what kind of conditions they are being subjected to and are deeply concerned for their safety, especially given unconfirmed reports that men and boys are being separated from their families, interrogated and even arrested."

Amira*, a nurse working in East Aleppo, said that a large part of her hospital had been recently destroyed in an airstrike and doctors and nurses had been forced to the basement where services had been reduced "to almost nothing".

"I am hearing reports that when the army advanced, they arrested all men above 18 years old, and that they were treating the families in a harsh way," Amira added.

Civilians are also at growing risk from unexploded ordinances that litter the city.

"As more people try to take shelter amidst the ruins or try to find ways to escape in all the chaos, the chances that cluster bombs and unexploded ordinance will go off, killing and injuring helpless civilians, is only rising," Khush said.

With the government widely expected to continue making advances over the coming hours and days, the already unacceptably high risks to children will only increase.

Save the Children continues to call for humanitarian access to civilians across Aleppo who are still without access to clean water and medical access. We also urge all sides to ensure that children are protected and spared from the worst impact of the violence in the city, with civilians who want to flee being allowed to do so safely.

*Identities have been changed for security reasons.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Tennessee Wildfires Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn (November 29, 2016) — A massive wildfire spread rapidly through the eastern Tennessee towns of Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge on Monday and Tuesday, leaving at least three people dead, displacing more than 14,000 and causing extensive damage to at least 150 homes and other buildings.

Save the Children has been working in Tennessee for 83 years, supporting schools in eight counties including Cocke County, which is near the fires, and is responding to the emergency. The organization’s staff is assessing the fire impact on the schools it supports near the affected area. They are reaching out to the superintendents and principals to determine who has been affected and what the needs are.

Staff is also in touch with state and national partners to determine unmet needs for children and how Save the Children could help. They are also contacting child care programs in the affected counties to determine if early education programs have been affected by the fires. Save the Children is the national leader in helping child care and early education programs affected by emergencies.

"Our hearts and thoughts go out to all those affected by the terrible wildfires in Tennessee," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "Children are often the most vulnerable during disasters such as this. We will be working with staff and partners on the ground to identify how we can best help children and families during this difficult time."

To support Save the Children’s work in response to the wildfires, visit: savethechildren.org/wildfires.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Save


Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Nov. 25, 2016) – Following reports of the tragic death of a 6-year-old child and woman during a fire in Moria detention center last night on the Greek island of Lesvos, Save the Children is calling on the EU and the Greek government to urgently work to tackle overcrowding in refugee camps on the islands by moving people to safe and open facilities on the mainland.

The fire was reportedly started accidently by people cooking inside their tent and quickly spread. Others, including the child’s mother and another 4-year-old child, suffered severe burns. Moria is extremely crowded, hosting around 5,000 people in facilities designed to hold 2,000.

"This fire – one of many recent incidents – highlights the failure of the EU and the Greek government to provide a safe environment for asylum seekers in Greece,” said Andreas Ring, Greece Response Director for Save the Children.

"It’s incomprehensible that until now, conditions have not improved for thousands of children and families trapped on the islands since the EU-Turkey deal came into effect in March. It’s almost winter and people are still living in shabby tents, bathrooms continue to be overcrowded, and services are over-stretched.

"European leaders must take responsibility for this incident. The lack of political will and the inefficiency of the EU bureaucracy should be equally condemned for the overcrowded conditions on the islands.

"It’s unacceptable that children fleeing death back home, die in Europe as they wait for paperwork to be completed. The EU and member states continue to drag their feet on family reunification and the relocation of asylum seekers, leaving people languishing in sub-standard camps.

“In September this year, when a fire ripped through Moria, Save the Children warned European leaders and the Greek authorities that the camp was a high risk environment and it was only a matter of days or months before someone was killed. We are utterly dismayed no action was taken then and our predication has become a heartbreaking reality."

With winter setting in, families are more likely to start cooking inside their tents which means that if facilities are not upgraded immediately, we could be seeing many more incidents like this where children could be killed and injured.

"As these tragic deaths show, the squalid conditions of Moria detention center are no place for children. The Greek camps are at breaking point, and freezing temperatures and overcrowding are only likely to worsen this crisis during winter. EU and Greek leaders must step up and act now; children forced to flee deserve better," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children president & CEO.

Save the Children’s mother and baby area, as well as the child friendly space in Moria, are open today and hosting mothers and children in the camp. A separate team is assessing the damage and needs of the mothers and children affected by the fire to determine the best way to intervene.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Search and Rescue November

Child Refugee Crisis Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (November 23, 2016) – Save the Children’s vessel, the Vos Hestia, is heading to the Sicilian port of Trapani with more than 400 people on board – including approximately 100 children and several pregnant women. The vast majority of the minors are thought to be travelling all alone.

This latest rescue took place in complete darkness early Tuesday morning, when Save the Children spotted an overcrowded wooden boat in distress off the coast of North Africa following a call from the Italian Coast Guard. Working together with two other vessels on the scene – MOAS’ Topaz Responder and Mimden – Save the Children’s rescue team brought all refugees and migrants safely on board the ship in an operation lasting around three hours.

The on-board medical team has attended to several cases requiring immediate attention, while specialist child protection experts have been giving psycho-social support to all children and other vulnerable cases.

Save the Children staff will be present on land when the vessel docks in Italy, to help with the disembarkation process and ensure children have access to their basic needs and rights once they’ve arrived in Europe.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Syrian Children's Relief Fund

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Nov. 22, 2016) — Hospitals across north-west Syria are looking at plans to further protect their facilities amid a constant wave of attacks. The defensive measures were prompted by sustained aerial bombardment on medical facilities in East Aleppo, which have left hospitals struggling to provide emergency care to gravely injured children. According to The Aleppo Health Directorate, these repeated attacks mean hospital workers are facing the prospect of having no safe space to carry out treatment at all, despite the high rate of casualties. The plans are being discussed for hospitals across Aleppo and Idlib governorates.

Aleppo has faced renewed and relentless bombardment since last Tuesday, killing hundreds of people and injuring countless others. East Aleppo saw a sustained attack over the weekend, with the area’s only pediatric hospital devastated by airstrikes. According to the World Health Organization, the area now has no functioning hospital facilities. Beyond East Aleppo, five hospitals and a mobile health clinic were bombed in rural Aleppo and Idlib in the last 10 days alone.

"It was barely possible to imagine that the situation in Aleppo could become any worse, and yet the scenes we have seen over the weekend have been truly horrifying," said Sonia Khush, Syria Director for Save the Children. "Packed emergency rooms are children who appear to have inhaled chlorine gas struggling to breathe, confused and separated from their families, and premature babies being rescued from damaged incubators and taken into smoke filled rooms as hospitals come under attack. Ambulances and mobile health units will do what they can to treat people when they are not being targeted themselves, but these only have room for a few patients and not nearly enough equipment to treat the range of injuries they are seeing."

Among those killed over the weekend was an education worker at a Save the Children supported school in East Aleppo. Maram, 27, was found under the rubble with her 6-month-old son, Abdullah.

Maram’s death follows the serious injury of another teacher working in a Save the Children supported school. Last week the male teacher was hit in an aerial bombardment and had to have his leg amputated.

"The bodies of Maram and her infant son were found after school teams and volunteers spent an entire day looking for signs of life under the rubble. She was a much loved member of the education team and her devastating loss is grieved by all that knew her," said Khush.

Classes at 13 Save the Children supported schools in East Aleppo have been suspended as shelling intensified in recent days. Meanwhile, in government-controlled West Aleppo, at least seven children were killed in an attack on a school on Sunday, showing that there is no safe place for children in this conflict.

"Children and aid workers are being bombarded by missiles while they are sitting at their school desks and seeking treatment in hospitals which are also under attack. The very places they should feel safest have become deadly," added Khush. "They are being pulled from the rubble but there is literally nowhere to take them for treatment for the kind of injuries they have sustained. It is a moral outrage that the death toll of Aleppo’s children continues to grow and seems only set to get worse, while so little action is being taken to end the bombing and hold warring parties accountable for these attacks on civilians. Parties to the conflict must come together to agree an immediate ceasefire, and to evacuate civilian casualties and get life-saving aid into the area."

The UN and opposition groups have negotiated access for an aid convoy which can proceed once all parties agree to a ceasefire. Save the Children is calling for an internationally monitored 72-hour ceasefire to bring humanitarian relief into East Aleppo and evacuate the sick and injured.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Campaign to Raise Funds for Save the Children, Other Leading Children’s Organizations

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, CONN. (Nov. 21, 2016) —The IKEA 'Let's Play for Change' campaign, which runs Nov. 20 to Dec. 24, is a new IKEA good cause campaign that will foster children’s development and learning, through participation in sports and play, by partnering with and supporting six leading children’s organizations, including Save the Children. During this campaign, for every children’s soft toy, book and or small play furniture item sold, the IKEA Foundation will make a donation of $1.10* (€1 EUR) to support children’s right to play and develop in some of the world’s most vulnerable communities.

The IKEA Foundation’s partners in this campaign are Handicap International Federation, Room to Read, Save the Children, Special Olympics, UNICEF and War Child. The programs supported by the campaign focus on children affected by disabilities, the Syrian conflict, unsafe migration, and poverty.

The UN Convention on the Rights of the Children states that every child should have the right to play. Sadly not every child enjoys this right. Millions of children are on the move, making them vulnerable to discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation, according to a play insights document released by IKEA Foundation today. The insights also revealed that children with disabilities are often the most likely to be excluded from play and learning activities.

"Many children around the world lack safe spaces to play. War and disasters are forcing more children than ever before to flee their homes and make difficult and dangerous journeys. Many more miss out on the chance to play because of poverty and prejudice. Children suffer the most in a crisis situation, and we are committed to upholding and raising awareness of their rights," commented Per Heggenes, CEO of IKEA Foundation.

"We believe every child has the right to a safe environment where their development through play is part of their everyday lives. Play sparks creativity and helps us learn and develop. The new IKEA ‘Let’s Play for Change’ campaign was established to support opportunities for children’s play, especially those in the most vulnerable communities. In partnership with the IKEA Foundation, Let’s Play for Change has the potential to change the lives of thousands of children around the world," commented Lars Petersson, IKEA US President.

The Let’s Play for Change campaign will be supporting Save the Children’s efforts to prevent unsafe migration of children by promoting protection, education and play for kids on the move in Bangladesh and Ethiopia.

Carolyn Miles, president & CEO of Save the Children said, "Save the Children is giving children on the move a chance of a better future. The IKEA Foundation, with support from IKEA employees and customers worldwide, helps us give children the opportunity to play, receive an education and be protected from harm. Children on the move are highly vulnerable and our program intends to deliver lasting improvements to their lives."

Through its five other partners, the Let’s Play for Change will also help:

Provide early childhood development opportunities to children with disabilities and other vulnerable children in displacement settings.

Promote, through sports and play, inclusion and development of children with intellectual disabilities.

Transform the lives of children through a high-quality of education that includes teacher training, provision of learning materials and developing children in both literacy and reading

Provide safe spaces, education and health support for children aged 0-8 to ensure early childhood development in some of the poorest communities.

Provide a safe environment to play, learn and develop for children in Jordan and Lebanon who have been affected by the Syrian conflict.

Let’s Play for Change builds on the success of previous IKEA good cause campaigns, which have raised $142.6 million (€118.8 million)* since 2003. This is the biggest IKEA good cause campaign yet – with more products and more partners than ever before.

*Based on the current market value of One Euro = $1.10 US dollar
**Based on average of One Euro = $1.12 approximately (during the course of the 13 year campaign)

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Agency’s Response and Recovery Efforts Have Reached Over 44,000 Children and Caregivers

Jennifer Garner West Virginia
West Virginia's own Jennifer Garner reads to children at Come Grow With Me Daycare, in Elkview, W.Va., on Saturday, July. 16, 2016. (Save the Children/Tyler Evert)

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, CONN. (Nov. 17, 2016) — More than four months since deadly floods hit West Virginia in June, children are still coping with the emotional aftermath of the devastation, which included 23 deaths and an estimated 4,000 homes damaged or destroyed*. Save the Children, in the days and weeks following the floods, provided immediate support to more than 44,000 children and caregivers. Building on this work, starting in December, teachers and community leaders will be helping children address their fears, anxiety and concerns in a safe setting, when they roll out Save the Children’s signature Journey of Hope program in the state’s five most heavily-affected counties – Clay, Greenbrier, Kanawha, Nicholas and Roane.

Working in partnership with West Virginia University, Save the Children trained 10 master trainers, who in-turn, with Save the Children’s support and guidance over the next six months, will train an additional 100 facilitators to deliver the program directly to small groups of children and caregivers in the affected communities. The program aims to serve at least 800 children across 18 schools through June 2017. By delivering the program in partnership with the University, Save the Children is building the local capacity to support children over the long-term.

Journey of Hope helps children and adults cope with traumatic events, develop their natural resiliency and strengthen their social support networks. The program, which was developed by Save the Children in 2007 after Hurricane Katrina, has been used in school and community settings following many U.S. natural disasters and emergencies. Through a series of team activities such as play, literacy, discussion and art, children learn to identify and manage their emotions and develop healthy coping skills for stress and trauma in an encouraging, safe and supportive environment.

"Even though the floods have passed, children are still recovering from the emotional distress of having their worlds turned upside down," said Anna Hardway, Save the Children's director of programs in West Virginia. "Many girls and boys have lost their sense of security, are unsure of their futures and need time to heal. Save the Children knows how critical it is to offer support to children that enables them to cope now -- to continue their mental, emotional and social development and to build the resiliency they need to bounce back from displacement and disaster."

In the months following the floods, Save the Children reached more than 44,000 children and caregivers, working closely with child-care providers, the community and public schools to help resume regular programming for kids, many in temporary settings. For example, with support from Save the Children, the Charleston YMCA is serving 124 children from all grade levels, providing support outside of regular school hours while school facilities are being rebuilt. The charity has also partnered with Kanawha County Schools to reopen six pre-K classrooms that would have otherwise been limited to one day a week. Those classrooms are now open four days a week.

In addition, Save the Children has helped 10 home-care providers reopen their home-based child-care programs, has supplied hundreds of home-care and day-care providers with much needed supplies, and has created a new, engaging after-school program for more than 70 displaced children in grades K-8 at an elementary school in Richwood.

"Children can begin to cope when they are able to interact and play with their peers and resume a normal routine," added Hardway. "That is why it was so important to get these children back into daycare, afterschool programs and the classroom. This is essential to engaging kids in a supportive manner and refocusing them on learning during a stressful time."

In the immediate days following the flooding, Save the Children also provided flood-affected families with essential household items, including car seats, Pack ‘n Plays, beds, assistive devices for those with disabilities and store gift cards for basic needs, among other things, to help them get back on their feet and resume their lives.

Save the Children raised more than $1.3 million for its West Virginia flood response. Save the Children Artist Ambassador and Trustee Jennifer Garner, a West Virginia native, also launched an Omaze Made #WestVirginiaStrong T-shirt campaign that raised an unprecedented $100,440.

For more information or to donate to Save the Children’s ongoing West Virginia flood recovery, visit: SavetheChildren.org/WestVirginia.

*Source: http://www.wdbj7.com/content/news/West-Virginia-lowers-estimate-of-homes-damaged-in-floods--386058981.html

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Iraqi Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (November 16, 2016) — Children are paying a heavy price one month into the Mosul offensive, with many seriously injured in the fighting or showing signs of intense psychological distress even if they make it to safety, Save the Children is warning.

So far nearly 60,000 people have fled the city and its surroundings, including tens of thousands of children. Many more families are expected to try to escape and make their way to camps for internally displaced people as the offensive continues.

Up to a dozen children a day are being maimed as the fighting pushes deeper into the city, front-line medics and hospital doctors have told the organization.

Even if they reach the relative safety of camps near Mosul without physical injury, Save the Children field staff now say children are displaying worrying signs of psychological distress.

Pictures drawn by children this week at one of the charity’s programmes in Qayyarah, 50 miles south of the city, featured tanks, soldiers with guns and people running away in terror.

Field staff said one child was so distressed she would not talk, only spit. Others were quick to anger, a typical sign of stress, with fights between children frequently breaking out in the camp.

Save the Children has deployed a child protection team to provide emergency psychological first aid to children escaping the violence, and has set up safe spaces for children to learn and play.

In Qayyarah Jad’ah camp, the charity is providing care for nearly 2,000 children with Child Friendly Spaces and tents for literacy and numeracy classes.

"Many children have been through two years of ISIS and were then forced to flee through a war zone, and some told us they have seen people shot and hanged. Imagine what effect that would have on a child," said Aram Shakaram, Deputy Country Director for Save the Children in Iraq.

"In countless conflicts we have seen how a safe space can transform a child. It helps them get back on track, escape uncertainty, and recover from the trauma of war.

"Life-saving aid like shelter, food and water are crucial in this crisis, but to help children recover from their ordeals, a safe space to learn must be considered a priority."

An estimated 600,000 children remain trapped inside Mosul.

One family in an ISIS-held part of the city told Save the Children they had recently been forced into a local school with 600 other people to be used as human shields. They were released after six hours when ISIS fighters decided to use relatives of police officers and Iraqi army soldiers instead.

Shakaram said more must be done to ensure the safety of civilians.

"It’s horrific that the only option these families and children have right now is to wave a white rag and pray they won’t get caught in the crossfire," he said.

"As this conflict pushes deeper into the city and becomes increasingly brutal, all parties must ensure civilians can flee safely and access humanitarian aid. Safe escape routes must be the priority, not an afterthought."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Children's Emergency Fund

No one knows when or where the next crisis will occur. Help provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (November 14, 2016) —An estimated 6,000 children living in detention centers and camps on the Greek islands are at risk with facilities on four out of five islands overflowing, Save the Children warned ahead of US President Barack Obama’s visit to Athens on November 15.

With most new arrivals detained on the islands since the European Union’s deal with Turkey in March of this year, 16,229 refugees and migrants – including 6,000 children – are living in facilities designed to hold only 8,204 people.

Chios is the most crowded and is at 380 percent capacity, with 4,100 people living in facilities intended for just 1,100. Samos is at 321 percent capacity, Kos at 199 percent and Lesvos at 174 percent.

"Many children, including unaccompanied children and children with disabilities, are currently living in squalid, crowded conditions on the Greek islands. Some children are forced to live in tents on the beach and use dirty toilets, exposing them to the risk of disease. They also have less access to basic services and protection," said Andreas Ring, Save the Children’s Greece Representative.

"With winter almost here, conditions will continue to deteriorate and we may see people sleeping in parks without any shelter, tents flooded and destroyed and an increase in mental and physical health issues. With no end in sight, children could still be stranded in these camps for months.

"The crowded conditions, together with the slow asylum process, are also creating a toxic environment in the camps and is leading to regular protests, which often turn violent. Under no circumstances is this a safe environment for children as they often get caught up in the violence.

"One six-year-old child living in a camp in Leros said to our staff: 'There's nothing nice here so there's no good part of my day. This place is like a prison and I just want to go back home."'

Save the Children urges President Obama and other world leaders to do more to ensure the safety of child refugees and migrants around the world, including in Greece.

"At the Leaders Summit for Refugees hosted by President Obama in September, important first steps were made in improving the lives of refugees around the world. However, much more still needs to be done and huge gaps remain," Ring said.

"In his speech tomorrow in Greece, it is hoped that President Obama will use the opportunity to advocate for EU Member States to remember commitments made at the summit and to do more to improve the situation for children in Greece. Instead of resorting to expulsions and detention centers, EU Member States should be sharing the responsibility of helping families and children who are fleeing violence and destruction.

"It is totally unacceptable for children and families be living in crowded camps where conditions are well below international standards. To relieve congestion, the EU should support Greece to move as many people as possible to safe and open camps on the mainland, starting with the most vulnerable people.

"The EU also needs to speed up the processing of asylum claims and the relocation and family reunification programs."

Save the Children has been providing assistance to children and adults across Greece since August 2015. We have operations across key locations in Greece: on the islands of Lesvos, Chios, Samos, Leros and Kos, and on the mainland in the Attika region (Athens) and in Northern Greece.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



New data from Save the Children reveals that in some areas up to half of all children under-five are suffering from acute malnutrition

Children's Emergency Fund

No one knows when or where the next crisis will occur. Help provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (November 14, 2016) — A new survey from Save the Children has found that up to half of all children under-five are acutely malnourished in some parts of north-east Nigeria where it is feared 200 children could die every day in a hidden hunger crisis.

Screenings carried out between June and October regularly found between 40 percent and 50 percent of children under-five to be acutely malnourished in some places. The figure could be even worse in areas that are out of reach because of insecurity, the charity says. Save the Children is warning that the hunger crisis threatens to overwhelm a desperately under-funded humanitarian response.

Ben Foot, Country Director of Save the Children Nigeria, has just visited intensive care units for malnourished children on the outskirts of Maiduguri, the capital city of Borno state and says the agency’s unit is struggling to cope.

"Children are arriving here fighting for their lives. Our intensive care unit is already over capacity and we are having to move severely malnourished children to mattresses on the floor. Our medical staff are working around the clock but in the absence of new funding it won’t be long before we could be in the painful position of having to turn away sick and starving children."

One of the children in the unit last week was a very thin and distressed 1-year-old girl named Saliha* whose mother had fled to Maiduguri after her husband was killed by insurgents. The woman’s other child, aged two, had died of measles before she could reach help.

"I never want to go back," the mother said. "All I want is for Saliha to get well."

A vital funding conference expected to be held in Geneva in early December could help to provide the money needed to prevent the hunger crisis from spiraling out of control, Save the Children says.

"The really shocking aspect of the international response is the absence of key international donors," Foot said. "With the UK, US and EU accounting for two-thirds of the aid provided, other countries need to step up."

North-east Nigeria’s humanitarian crisis - the result of a brutal seven-year insurgency which has forced 1 million children from their homes – has been described by the United Nations as the most neglected in the world.

Another mother at Save the Children’s clinic said her husband, uncle and three of her children had been murdered in front of her. Her 2-year-year old daughter was acutely malnourished, under-developed and suffering from pneumonia when she arrived. Doctors had saved the toddler’s life but feared that her mother, who had nothing, would be unable to keep the girl and two other children healthy.

With a United Nations appeal only 38 percent funded, 75,000 severely malnourished children could die within a year unless they receive immediate humanitarian aid, the UN says.

"Children are showing up in desperate conditions and facing severe malnutrition, often in combination with other life-threatening illnesses like pneumonia, malaria and diarrhea," said Ben Foot. "For some cases this may be the second or third time they have fought malnutrition so their immune systems are already severely weakened. We just don’t have the resources to enable us to follow up on cases effectively."

Ben Foot added: "The international community needs to wake up to the scale of the crisis unfolding in north-east Nigeria. We need a humanitarian response plan of at least $1 billion for the end of 2016, into 2017. That’s double the amount requested this year, and only one-third of that request was met. Repeating this performance will cost thousands of children their lives."

Save the Children has provided treatment to 12,000 children suffering from severe acute malnutrition in north-east Nigeria. In September, it opened a new stabilization center to provide lifesaving care to a rising number of children suffering from the most severe form of acute malnutrition with complications such as malaria.

The organization is providing emergency food assistance to 7,500 families, and aims to reach 5,000 more in the next few weeks. The food assistance comes in the form of electronic vouchers, which are managed through a mobile phone platform. Save the Children has built latrines and water pumps, is providing care for 3- to 5-year-olds and is training foster parents to care for children who have been separated from their own parents.

*Name changed to protect identity

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



New Technology Offers Easy, Secure and Private Way to Donate

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Global Action Fund

Fairfield, Conn. (Nov. 14, 2016) — Global aid organization Save the Children announced today that supporters can now donate to the organization using Apple Pay, making donating via mobile easy, secure and private.

Save the Children has a long history of innovation in its work and in ways donors can support its mission to serve children. By accepting Apple Pay, Save the Children continues to be a pioneer in charitable giving -- allowing supporters to give faster, easier and more secure than ever before.

“Save the Children is excited to accept Apple Pay to make it easier for our supporters to donate to our programs benefiting children around the world,” said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children’s President & CEO. “We’re embracing this new technology that makes supporting our work easier, faster, and safer.”

Apple Pay is easy to set up and users will continue to receive all of the rewards and benefits offered by credit and debit cards.

Security and privacy is at the core of Apple Pay. When supporters use a credit or debit card with Apple Pay, the actual card numbers are not stored on the device, nor on Apple servers. Instead, a unique Device Account Number is assigned, encrypted and securely stored in the Secure Element on your device. Each transaction is authorized with a one-time unique dynamic security code.

Donating in apps and on websites accepting Apple Pay is as simple as the touch of a finger with Touch ID, so there’s no need to manually fill out lengthy account forms or repeatedly type in billing information.

When making payments for goods, services and donations on the go in apps or Safari, Apple Pay works with iPhone 6 and later, iPad Pro, iPad Air 2, and iPad mini 3 and later. You can also use Apple Pay in Safari on any Mac introduced in or after 2012 running macOS Sierra and confirm the payment with iPhone 6 or later or Apple Watch.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Jordyn Linsk
475-225-3160

 

Children's Emergency Fund

No one knows when or where the next crisis will occur. Help provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Nov. 13, 2016) — Aid workers from Save the Children will mobilize staff to meet the needs of children and their families affected by last night's earthquake in New Zealand if there is a need for a humanitarian response. The powerful 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck approximately 30 miles north-east of Christchurch and was felt across the country. A tsunami warning is in place and residents in low-lying areas have been urged to evacuate.

"The full extend of the earthquake damage is still emerging, but we know from previous experience in earthquake how badly children can be affected from natural disasters like this," said Heather Hayden, Save the Children's CEO in New Zealand. "It will be important for parents and caregivers to allow children to express their feelings about the earthquake they lived through."

"As we have done in other disasters we may look at establishing what's known as child friendly spaces. Child friendly spaces can improve children's psychological wellbeing by helping to re-establish routine, provide support and a sense of stability, as well as an opportunity to play. The spaces also provide respite for families under stress, so parents can focus on re-establishing their livelihoods knowing their children are in safe hands.

"We strive to support children in disasters like earthquakes. We did it following the last Christchurch earthquake and we will do it again if there is a need to now," added Hayden.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Brendan Daly 202.794.1580

WASHINGTON, D.C. (November 9, 2016) — Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles.

"Congratulations to President-elect Donald Trump.

"In this time of political leadership change in the United States, Save the Children remains committed to our mission for almost 100 years — to make sure every child has the basic health care, education and protection from harm they need and deserve.

"In our work in the U.S. and around the world, we work with all those committed to this mission. The people of the United States and our government have always supported this mission and we need continued strong U.S. international leadership and engagement.

"We look forward to working with the new administration to continue to ensure that every last child has a healthy start, the ability to learn from a high quality education and protection from harm."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Fifty Percent from Each Sweatshirt Sold Benefits Save the Children

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (Nov. 8, 2016) — 'Tis the season to be jolly! For the holidays this year, Save the Children is partnering with some of the world’s top models and an online shop and platform for parents, Selfish Mother, to create a series of slogan sweatshirts in celebration of the season.

Models Karen Elson, Jon Kortajarena, David Gandy and Immy Waterhouse, among others, have partnered with blogger Molly Gunn, the brains behind the brand Selfish Mother and the #GoodTees initiative to create a range of sweatshirts that not only look good, but also do good. On sale now, the designs each feature a unique and cheeky slogan and will be available to purchase exclusively at Selfish Mother’s online store, 'The FMLY Store.'

"We are delighted to have Molly Gunn of Selfish Mother on board along with inspiring models such as Karen, Jon and Immy who have all worked together to create these fun designs," said Carolyn Miles, president & CEO of Save the Children. "Money raised from the sale of the sweatshirts could help Save the Children give children living in a refugee camp clothes to keep them warm through winter or buy nutritious food for their entire family. It could also help us to bring essentials like healthcare, education, protection and food to the millions of children around the world who are missing out on the most basic support. All this, just by wearing a sweatshirt – it’s an easy way to help solve serious problems."

Featuring festive words and slogans including 'SPARKLE,' 'BAUBLES,' 'OFF DUTY ELF,' 'SANTA’S HELPER,' 'NUTCRACKER' and 'SECRET SANTA,' the adult sweatshirts are unisex, offering both men and women the chance to get their hands on an exclusive design for £45 ($50)*. Children can also join in the festive spirit with a sweatshirt priced at £20 ($22.50). In support of this worthwhile and worldwide cause, 50% from each sweatshirt sold (around $25.00 per adult sweatshirt and $11 per kid’s sweatshirt) will be donated to Save the Children.

"By buying this sweatshirt, we can all do our part and be real Santa’s Helpers just like Save the Children helps so many kids around the world every day," Jon Kortajarena who helped design the "Santa’s Helper" sweatshirt. "Last year, I had the chance to see their work in Nepal, and it really is extraordinary. It changed me and my priorities. They are real heroes! Now we have an opportunity to help them, so I urge you all to join me in supporting such an amazing cause."

Added Karen Elson, who helped create the "Sparkle" sweatshirt, "I’m thrilled to be a part of the Save the Children’s campaign this year. Having seen the charity’s work first-hand helping Syrian refugees in Za’atari refugee camp in Jordan and helping mothers to give birth in a safe place with a health worker present in both Sierra Leone and Cote D’Ivoire, I can tell you that by purchasing one of my 'SPARKLE' sweatshirts, you will actually be helping to save the life of a child!"

"I had such great Christmas fun collaborating with the Selfish Mother brand and producing my 'BAUBLES' sweatshirt for Save the Children’s holiday campaign," said Immy Waterhouse. "I look forward to people wearing my design in support of, and raising funds for, Save the Children."

David Gandy also said, "I feel honored that Save the Children has asked me to join this fantastic line-up to create my very own holiday sweatshirt with Molly Gunn. They do so much great work every year helping children worldwide and now my very own NUTCRACKER sweatshirt can contribute to this brilliant cause."

'Wear & Share' on social media using @SavetheChildren @SelfishMother @TheFMLYStore Instagram handles.

*The FMLY Store lists prices in British pounds. Prices will be converted to US dollars upon checkout.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Richard Blais
Celebrity chef Richard Blais ran in the New York City Marathon Sunday, Nov. 6, for Team Save the Children. Photo by Errol Anderson/Courtesy of New York Road Runners

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (Nov. 7, 2016) — Celebrity chef and "Top Chef All Stars" winner Richard Blais took a break from the kitchen yesterday to run the New York City Marathon for Team Save the Children and help give kids in the United States and around the world a strong start in life.

"Running is a vital part of my health regimen, but running for a cause is much more meaningful," said Blais. "I’m thrilled I got to run this year’s New York City Marathon with Team Save the Children -- a charity committed to giving kids all over the world a brighter future."

Save the Children’s international endurance program, Team Save the Children, provides athletes the opportunity to take on a personal challenge while raising funds for Save the Children programs.

The team came to the 2016 TCS New York City Marathon with 24 members -- including Blais – all focused on raising funds that will help kids survive, learn and be protected. They entered the race on target to raise more than $50,000 for kids.

Blais, who just finished his fourth New York City Marathon, said before the race that he was not targeting a time to beat, but just wanted to run a "healthy and happy race."

"I want to be able to jog the next day, that’s my goal," he said.

He also said his post-race meal always includes "red meat – a lot of it," while he likes to keep his meal choices very simple the night before.

"I’ve been 20-plus miles in before, burping up charred octopus," he said. "I don’t recommend it."

In 2015, Save the Children worked in 120 countries and reached an estimated 185 million children. This included helping to deliver high-impact health care to 22.6 million kids and quality education for 12.2 million children.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Iraq

Iraqi Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (November 6, 2016) — More than 1 million children who have been living under ISIS in Iraq have either been out of school or forced to learn from an ISIS curriculum, some for more than two years, warns global aid organization Save the Children.

As Iraqi forces continue to battle for control of the suburbs of Mosul city, the number of people displaced by fighting since the offensive was launched on October 17 has climbed to around 34,000 - a 50 percent increase since Friday.

Parents of children who lived under ISIS rule and are now based at Jad’ah camp, south of Qayyarah, say the extremist content of the curriculum aimed to brainwash children and turn them into fighters.

Father of five, Hamid*, said: "They would teach children how to make bombs. When children came out from school there was a big TV in the garden where they were showing propaganda: how to kill and how to make suicide bombs and how to cut heads off."

He said only boys were allowed to go to school, but most parents did their best to protect them by keeping them at home despite pressure from ISIS.

"We told them… you should not believe it. This is not the right Islam. We were guiding our children to make sure they didn’t believe everything they were taught."

Karim* has four children. He said many children as young as 12 were recruited by ISIS at school to fight.

"Some children told me that ISIS used to take them to their base for 40 days to train them and to tell them that it’s Halaal (permissable) to kill army people," he said.

They used to take about 50-100 children for each program. A lot of children obeyed ISIS and then they were killed in fighting."

Karim said his children lived in constant fear and he was frustrated by having to keep them out of school to protect them.

"It’s difficult for my girls, they were very scared, crying all the time, shaking. I want my children to get educated, and get a job. The most important thing for them is to learn to read and to write."

There are now more than 1,000 families living at the camp, where Save the Children has built temporary classrooms to get children back to learning as quickly as possible.

Save the Children Iraq country director Maurizio Crivellaro said the children were excited to get started. "Innocent children should never be exposed to this kind of instruction at school. Getting them back into a safe and positive school environment is critical to starting the recovery process and in giving them hope for their future.

"As soon as we set the classrooms up, they were already gathering outside and peering in curiously. Judging by the big smiles on their faces, they knew this is how school should be and they were excited to get back to normal."

Teachers at the schools have begun running recreational activities and games for the children, before they get started on basic literacy and numeracy, and then introduce the Iraqi curriculum, with support from the affected communities and the Ninewa Directorate of Education (DoE).

Mr. Crivellaro said some children had never been to school and they would need extra support.

"All displaced children will need to attend non-formal or catch up classes for at least the next few months before they are reassessed and referred to formal schools depending on their performance, and as per guidance and support from the DoE," he said.

"Children and parents tell us that during times of crisis, education is their priority. They tell us it’s the key to their future and it can’t be delayed. These children have missed out on enough of their childhoods."

*Names have been changed to protect identities.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (November 4, 2016) — Save the Children is warning that injured children in East Aleppo will remain trapped in the besieged city, without access to vital medical treatment and unable to leave, as today’s 'humanitarian corridors' fail to offer a viable solution for civilians in need.

According to Medecins Sans Frontieres, around 1,500 children are in need of medical treatment that is not available in the besieged area of the city.

The corridors proposed by the Russian and Syrian armed forces have not been negotiated in conjunction with the UN and International Committee of the Red Cross. As a result, it is highly unlikely that it will be possible to bring aid in, or for injured people to be evacuated before the window ends tonight.

Fears continue to grow among civilians and NGOs that the city will face an intensified bombardment, soon after the ceasefire ends.

Sonia Khush, Save the Children’s Syria Director, said: "It is desperately worrying that military resources are being replenished while it appears that no medical evacuations have taken place, nor has any aid reached the besieged city. Civilians have witnessed an escalation in violence following ceasefire periods previously, and there is an expectation that this will happen again."

Indiscriminate violence perpetrated by all sides in the battle for Aleppo has already taken an appalling toll on civilians, killing and maiming hundreds of children in East and West Aleppo since the ceasefire collapsed in September. Attacks continued throughout last night with opposition forces launching counter strikes attempting to break the siege.

Children who have suffered severe and complicated injuries, including burns, head trauma and extensive shrapnel wounds, often can’t be properly treated in East Aleppo, where hospitals have been bombed and the majority of medical staff have fled or been killed.

Medical supplies have been blocked from entering the city for months, leading to critical shortages of basic supplies. Doctors in the city say they only have enough anaesthetic to last two weeks – or approximately 800 operations. Aid agencies urgently need to both bring aid in and evacuate the most serious cases for treatment.

Sonia Khush added: "It appears that civilians in East Aleppo are being told to either surrender, or starve and be bombed. Humanitarian corridors should allow aid to come in and for those who wish or need to leave to exit – they are not supposed to be in place as a means to force people from their homes.

"It’s likely that the 'corridors' will close at 7:00 tonight with very few people actually leaving and without aid entering the city. Civilians are therefore effectively sitting targets, waiting for the next bombardment. Aleppo has taken an obscene battering over the last two months, with health facilities devastated. Civilians in Aleppo cannot withstand another sustained attack or cope with the increased casualties it would bring.

"The carelessness with which Syria’s warring parties and their backers have treated civilian lives is appalling. There can be no excuse for siege tactics, collective punishment and the consistent bombing of hospitals and schools in the 21st century."

Save the Children and other aid agencies have humanitarian relief positioned to enter East Aleppo but need a workable agreement between all parties to the conflict and a ceasefire of at least 72 hours to deliver it to the people who need it most.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Tickets for the Event Will Cost $5, With 100 Percent of the Purchase Price of Each Ticket Benefiting Save the Children

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, CONN. (Nov. 4, 2016) — As a part of its continuing tradition of giving back to the community, Lord & Taylor has announced Save the Children as the charity partner for the unveiling of its world-renowned holiday windows in New York City on Thursday, Nov. 10. Save the Children, which will receive all of the proceeds from the event’s ticket sales, provides children in the United States and around the world with a healthy start, the opportunity to learn, and protection from harm.

For Lord & Taylor, the holiday windows unveiling marks the 79th year that animated, non-commercial holiday windows will be displayed at the Fifth Avenue flagship, and the event will feature a performance by breakout musician Daya.

"Save the Children is thrilled to team up with Lord & Taylor as the charity partner for their holiday window unveiling this year," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children president & CEO. "With the season of giving upon us, we are working hard to raise awareness and funds to help children in need in the U.S. and around the world. Save the Children asks everyone to give back this holiday season — alongside Lord & Taylor — to create a better and brighter future for every last child."

"Lord & Taylor is proud to partner with Save the Children as we kick off the holiday season with our spectacular window unveiling and charity day," stated Liz Rodbell, President of Hudson’s Bay and Lord & Taylor. "We’re delighted to welcome Daya as part of the evening’s celebrations and look forward to another wonderful holiday season."

Every floor of the Fifth Avenue flagship will be filled with exciting activations, such as photo booths, styling consultations, complimentary monogramming, shoe shining, and watch engraving, as well as gift-with-purchase opportunities, refreshments, entertainment and more.

With the purchase of a $5 ticket, customers will receive a storewide savings pass of 15 percent off regular and sale-priced items, including cosmetics and fragrances, plus two 25 percent bonus coupons for single-item discounts (for use on Nov. 10 only; some exclusions apply). Tickets are available for purchase now at the Lord & Taylor flagship on Fifth Avenue. Lord & Taylor will make a minimum contribution of $25,000 to Save the Children.

Vendor partners including 1 State, BCBGMAXAZRIA, Calvin Klein, Camuto Group, Cece, Clarins, Coach, G-III, Marc Fisher Footwear, Movado, Peerless, and Perry Ellis have kindly contributed to the Lord & Taylor and Save the Children partnership. Vendors will also sponsor in-store animations or promotions on Nov. 10.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Child Refugee Crisis Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (November 4, 2016) – Two very young children, whose mother died while on board a boat ferrying refugees and migrants from North Africa to Europe, were rescued by Save the Children today as part of an operation in which more than 100 people were saved by our search and rescue vessel, the Vos Hestia.

Several children, including one as young as two years-old, were among those on board the boat ferrying migrants and refugees.

The two children who lost their mother have no other relatives with them and are now under the care of Save the Children's on board child protection teams, who work closely with the Italian authorities. Prayers were said on board for their mother.

Today’s rescue came less than 24 hours after more than 240 migrants and refugees are believed to have drowned when two rubber dinghies capsized off the North African coast, survivors told Save the Children. Only 29 people out of the at least 270 people believed to have been on board the two dinghies were pulled alive from the water.

Save the Children was on hand to assist the rescue operations late on Wednesday and spotted two women who had been out at sea for hours.

"There are no words to describe the horrific events we have witnessed over the past 24 hours," said Roger Alonso, Save the Children’s team leader on the Vos Hestia.

"We’ve seen a mother in utter shock, unable to speak after losing her baby. Two young children have witnessed their mother die in unspeakable circumstances. These mothers left Africa with their children with hopes of a better future – it cost them their lives. Our team is now doing everything they can to provide support to these children, including psychological care."

"This needless loss of life highlights the perverse impact of current EU policy, which is focused on protecting borders rather than providing to refugees and migrants, especially those most vulnerable, legal and safe ways to reach sanctuary in our countries," Alonso added.

Save the Children has repeatedly called for the EU to provide safe and legal routes into Europe, such as resettlement, humanitarian visas and other forms of humanitarian admissions, which should help to ensure minimum standards of protection, especially for children.

So far, 2016 has been the deadliest year on record for those crossing the Mediterranean, and if the number of causalities from the latest shipwreck is confirmed, more than 4,100 people will have died trying to make it to Europe from North Africa.

The journey is so dangerous that the likelihood of dying while trying to make the crossing is now 1 for every 47 arrivals. Save the Children has rescued more than 1,300 people, including more than 200 children, and is continuing to conduct its life saving-operations to help prevent more people losing their lives at sea.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Search and Rescue November

Child Refugee Crisis Relief Fund

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (November 3, 2016) — Today, Save the Children’s search and rescue ship was called to help Norwegian navy ship Siem Pilot and a merchant vessel in the recovery of survivors and dead bodies after a rubber dinghy capsized off of the North African coast with bad sea conditions.

The organization rescued 29 people along with 12 bodies. Yet, the rubber dinghies usually carry many more people on board and the number of drowned or missing people could be much higher. Save the Children’s team is working with partners and continuing to carry out the search into the night.

Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children said: "This is yet another tragic reminder that when there are no safe and legal routes, people will die at sea.

"The EU should provide safe and legal routes into Europe such as resettlement, humanitarian visas and increased flexibility in family reunification processes, which all should ensure minimum standards of protection, especially for children.

"More people have drowned so far this year than all of last year, making 2016 the deadliest year on record for those crossing the Mediterranean. This loss of life highlights the importance of search and rescue operations to prevent people losing their lives at sea."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Iraqi Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (November 1, 2016) — As Iraqi forces close in on IS-held Mosul, now is a critical moment to protect children and open safe routes to allow the 1.5 million civilians still trapped in the city, including about 600,000 children, to leave safely.

With civilians bracing for the anticipated escalation in violence, Save the Children warns that safe passages must be urgently established.

Maurizio Crivellaro, Save the Children’s Iraq Country Director said innocent civilians face growing risks each day they remain in Mosul. "As fighting escalates, it is going to become increasingly difficult for families to leave, and for those who remain and are injured to get the medical treatment they need. We cannot sit back and wait for another situation like Aleppo to unfold while there is still the opportunity to get children out of the warzone."

Fears are mounting for families trapped in the city amid reports of civilians being rounded up as targets, with IS placing them in the line of fire ahead of the imminent onslaught. An increasing number of hospitals and schools are believed to be occupied by IS fighters, and concerns are growing that they will be targeted by military forces in the coming days.

Mahmoud* recently escaped the village of Shura, south of Mosul. As fighting approached the village about a week ago, he and his family were taken deeper into IS territory, where IS were reportedly forcing people to act as human shields.

"We and about 100 families were taken on foot about 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) along the road and were about to arrive in Surouj when Iraqi military helicopters attacked. There was so much fighting everywhere and we were trapped between the two villages."

In the chaos, the families fled back to their village, but were forced to leave again days later when they heard IS was coming back.

While more than 17,700 people have fled from towns in the Mosul region as the frontline has approached the city, the residents of Mosul itself have been prevented from leaving by IS fighters who have planted land mines and stationed snipers around the city, as well as by fighting in the area.

"Protecting innocent civilians must be the priority in this battle," Crivellaro said. "Reports that IS has kidnapped people from villages nearby Mosul city shows they intend to make this fight as difficult as possible by hiding in a city full of civilians.

"Iraqi forces must ensure that families are given genuinely safe passages out of the city to avoid mass casualties of innocent civilians who will be caught in the crossfire and beyond the reach of humanitarian aid.

"Military commanders have previously suggested vulnerable families stay inside and put white flags on their homes. This risks making them targets.

"The recent commitment of the Iraqi Prime Minister to establish safe corridors is reassuring – we need to see this prioritized and it should happen as soon as possible."

Mahmoud said that children’s quality of life was under IS rule was significantly impacted, and they were unable to go to school or enjoy any semblance of normality. "I have four daughters. Before IS, the older ones were going to school and loved it. When IS took over the content of the curriculum changed, so we stopped sending them to school. Every lesson became militarized. Even math lessons—they would teach the children ‘one bullet plus one bullet equals two bullets’. They haven’t been to school for two years."

"We didn’t have anything – I even had to sell my car for money to spend on food and medicine for my children," he said.

*Names have been changed to protect identities.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Health system ravaged by war has collapsed, unable to cope with contagious diseases

Yemen Children

Triplets were brought into al-Sabeen Children’s Hospital in Sana’a, Yemen, suffering from cholera. Photo Credit: Mohammed Awadh/Save the Children

Children's Emergency Fund

No one knows when or where the next crisis will occur. Help provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (October 31, 2016) – Millions of Yemen's children are at risk from a triple threat of malnutrition, which has left their immune systems low, a spiralling cholera epidemic, and a new outbreak of the highly infectious measles virus, reports global aid organization Save the Children.

The warning comes as fighting between the Saudi Arabia-led coalition and Houthi opposition group has raged all week, since a 72-hour ceasefire ended and failed to secure lasting peace.

At least 1.5 million children are already acutely malnourished and millions more are 'food insecure,' going to bed hungry every night. This is the result of 19 months of hostilities during which imports of essential supplies including food, fuel and medicine have been severely restricted; humanitarian access obstructed; and hospitals and other vital civilian facilities bombed.

Of the 7.6 million people declared to be 'at risk' of cholera, approximately half are assumed to be children – around 3.8 million.

A 7-year-old girl named Yasmine was treated for cholera in al-Sabeen Children’s Hospital in the capital city Sana’a, alongside her sister and triplet brothers. Her father Bashir, 38, said: "Their grandmother had symptoms and three days later, six of our children – three girls and three boys – were infected. They got severe diarrhea. Immediately, we went to the closest clinic in our area but the doctors could not accept the cases. My daughter Yasmine went into a coma, I was very scared. The doctor in the clinic suggested I take her and the other children to the hospital in Sana’a."

Because al-Sabeen Hospital has run out of some supplies, like many hospitals in Yemen, staff have been forced to ask patients to buy their own medicine externally. When available, it is vastly overpriced.

Bashir said: "I called my cousin to lend me some money for the medicine, I got the money, but I didn't find the medicine. I kept driving all night to find potassium for oral intake. I found only one bottle, but I needed two. So I gave it to my daughter Yasmine first who is in a seriously bad situation." One bottle cost nearly $23 USD.

The father spent most of the money he had been saving for years: "I had saved about 650,000 riyal ($3,100 USD) but I spent it all now, I only have 8,000 riyal ($39) left. I own a minibus, it is in bad condition but I’m willing to sell it for my children."

Dr. Najat, who treated Yasmine, said: "Yasmine suffers from kidney failure owing to severe dehydration which stemmed from cholera, and she needs intensive care. The situation is very bad here in the hospital, we are really facing a crisis. We are lacking medicine, equipment, doctors and staff salaries."

Save the Children staff in Yemen have also recorded five cases of measles, a highly infectious airborne virus that spreads quickly amongst those who have not been vaccinated against it.

Dr. Najat said: "Further to cholera cases, we received five cases from Sa’dah infected with measles. This is serious because it is a contagious disease and it might spread to Sana’a city."

The doctor immediately referred the measles cases to the city’s main hospital, Al Thawra, to prevent the disease from spreading amongst his already weak cholera-infected child patients.

Edward Santiago, Save the Children’s Yemen Country Director, said: "The de facto blockade has starved Yemen of food, medicine and medical supplies, including some vaccines. Many health facilities have been damaged and 600 have been closed due to the conflict, leaving millions without very basic healthcare. The country’s health system is on its knees and is no fit state to deal with an infectious disease outbreak."

Two-thirds of Yemenis do not have access to clean water and sanitation services, especially those in cities, further increasing the risk of infection. The conflict has caused thousands of families to flee and camp on the outskirts of Sana’a where conditions are unsanitary and could see the rapid spread of cholera though contaminated food and water.

Save the Children is preparing to launch a three-month cholera prevention programme. The organization is calling for an immediate and permanent ceasefire, and for the importation and distribution of food, fuel and medicine to be scaled up urgently.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Child Refugee Crisis Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 27, 2016) — The situation for refugee and migrant children in Calais, France, after the demolition of the "Jungle" camp is the worst it has ever been, Save the Children is warning. Dozens of children were forced to sleep outside last night after being denied a safe place in Calais. Vulnerable children slept under bridges, outside warehouses and in the Jungle camp itself, which has become an increasingly volatile environment.

With fires blazing through the Jungle, registration closed and temporary accommodation full, children had nowhere to go. Staff on the ground have raised concerns that many children have already run away, having given up hope that this process will provide them with safety.

"Last night, we spent hours trying to negotiate a place for three young Eritrean boys – two were 13 years old and the other was 14 years old," said Dorothy Sang, a Save the Children aid worker in the camp. "Despite their pleading and most of the Jungle being burned to the ground, the boys were refused. They had to spend another night in the Jungle, which is now the most dangerous it has ever been for children.

"It’s disappointing to see this being reported as a success when so many vulnerable children have been left behind and so many more have run away. We may never know where they have gone."

Save the Children is urging that decisions, about where children who have been registered should go, are made in a fair and transparent way.

"We are pleased that vulnerable children are finally going to the UK," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "However, it is disappointing that this is being carried out alongside the imminent demolition of the Jungle, which is creating fear and chaos in the camp.

"Now that hundreds of these children are registered and in safe accommodation, they must be given the reassurance that they will have their voices heard and a fair assessment to determine whether they go to the UK or stay in France."

Save the Children has been working with partner agencies in Calais to set up information points in the camp along the path from the camp to the registration warehouse. There is still a lack of information and communication from the authorities, which has made it unclear what will happen to these children. Save the Children and its partners will continue outreach work today to get the remaining children into safe accommodation.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 27, 2016) — Following yesterday’s deadly attack on a school in Idlib and the ongoing bombing of schools and hospitals in Syria, Nick Finney, Save the Children’s North-West Syria Country Director, said: "Save the Children is appalled by yesterday’s bombing of a school in Idlib, Syria, which reportedly killed 22 children. There is no excuse for bombing a school or other civilian infrastructure like hospitals, which should be known to the warring parties, and yet we see it happening time and again in Syria.

"Of the 60 schools Save the Children supports in Idlib and neighboring Aleppo, 44 have been affected by bombing this year alone with several badly damaged. The majority of those incidents have happened in the last few months, as violence has intensified across north-west Syria. At least 20 students and teachers from our schools have been killed or injured this year, an outrageous toll on innocent civilians.

"Syria’s children, like children anywhere else in the world, deserve the chance to learn and play without the risk of being killed in their classrooms. We want to see an end to attacks on schools and accountability for anyone who bombs or occupies a school – these horrific attacks constitute a potential war crime and should be subject to an international investigation."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Event Will Support Save the Children’s Efforts to End Preventable Child Deaths and Promote Early Childhood Education

Jen Garner GALA 2016
Jennifer Garner onstage with Brantley Smith, an Early Steps participant from West Virginia, at the 4th Annual Save the Children Illumination Gala. Credit: Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Save The Children.
Iman GALA 2016
Supermodel & Activist Iman, and Supermodel Bethann Hardison, attend the 4th Annual Save the Children Illumination Gala in New York City. Credit: Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images for Save The Children

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

NEW YORK (October 26, 2016) –Save the Children, the leading organization investing in childhood, honored supermodel and activist Iman; gamer, philanthropist and activist Bachir Boumaaza aka "Athene;" writer and Red Nose Day co-founder Richard Curtis; and the organization’s philanthropic corporate partner Toys"R"Us at the 4th Annual Save the Children Illumination Gala. The event, which took place on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, at The Plaza hotel in New York City, was hosted by Save the Children Artist Ambassador and Trustee Jennifer Garner, and featured a special performance by country music superstar Jennifer Nettles.

Now in its fourth year, the Illumination Gala benefitted Save the Children’s efforts to give more children a stronger start in life by helping end preventable maternal, newborn and child deaths and by supporting early childhood education. In recognition of the occasion, Save the Children celebrated each of the honorees for their achievements in giving children a brighter future:

The Voice Award for Iman, Supermodel, Activist and Founder of IMAN Cosmetics, who was recognized for her enduring commitment to sharing the stories of the world’s most deprived children. While serving as our Artist Ambassador, Iman was tireless in her efforts to raise awareness for the 2011 food crisis in East Africa. By participating in our Fast-athon, using her jewelry line to raise emergency funds and calling on the international community to take action, Iman has given a voice to children who would otherwise go unheard.

The Next Generation Award for Bachir Boumaaza aka "Athene," Gamer, Philanthropist and Activist, who was recognized for inspiring young gamers to make a positive impact on the world. Athene has visited our programs in Southeast Asia and Africa to livestream from the field while generating media coverage, brand awareness and millions of dollars to support our programs. His GamingforGood volunteer team, platform and network have connected thousands of gamers and streamers to our work, and transformed our approach to reaching the next generation of donors and fundraisers.

The Advocate Award for Richard Curtis, Writer, Campaigner, and Red Nose Day Co-Founder, who was recognized for pioneering the use of entertainment to drive positive change. As co-founder of Comic Relief in the UK over 30 years ago, Curtis has devoted much of his life to achieving the vision of a just world, free from poverty. Through innovative programs like Red Nose Day, that today engage millions around the world, he has helped direct billions of dollars and priceless public attention toward tackling the root causes of poverty and injustice.

The Visionary Award for Toys"R"Us, being accepted David Brandon, CEO and Chairman. The company was recognized for their commitment to keeping kids safe and helping them in times of need in the United States and around the world. Through the Play with Purpose campaign, Toys"R"Us leveraged its brand to spotlight early learning through play as a critical component of childhood development. Since 2005, Toys"R"Us has contributed more than $9 million to Save the Children's emergency response and early childhood education programs, demonstrating their commitment to children every day and in times of crisis.

The event’s entertainment was provided by Grammy® Award-winning singer-songwriter Jennifer Nettles, who has also won five American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers Awards, two Academy of Country Music Awards and six Country Music Association Awards, among others.

"We were thrilled to recognize such a diverse group of honorees who have done outstanding work with and on behalf of children around the world. It was a wonderful event and an amazing opportunity to highlight their important work and to celebrate their achievements. They have all committed their time and lent their voices to giving children a brighter future," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children president & CEO.

Other notable guests in attendance included Dakota Fanning, actress and Save the Children Artist Ambassador, Bridgit Mendler, actress, singer/songwriter and Save the Children Artist Ambassador, Sara Sampaio, model and Save the Children Celebrity Cabinet Member, Ryan Serhant and Emilia Bechrakis Serhant (Bravo’s Million Dollar Listing New York), Alix Angjeli (Model),Rubina Dyan (Model), Madison Headrick (Model), Gracie Carvalho (Model), Bregje Heinen (Model), Paige Reifler (Model), Cate Underwood (Model), Flavia Lucini (Model), Niamh Adkins (Model) among others. Gabriela Hearst, fashion designer and philanthropist, and Mary Dillon, Save the Children Trustee and CEO of ULTA Beauty, served as co-chairs of the 4th Annual Save the Children Illumination Gala.

The gala was presented by Johnson & Johnson. For more information, please visit www.savethechildren.org/gala.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Child Refugee Crisis Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 25, 2016) — As bulldozers move in to demolish the Calais "Jungle" camp, Save the Children is warning that hundreds of unaccompanied children still have not been able to register and have nowhere safe to stay. Staff on the ground say children need to be to be moved to a secure area immediately, as the situation is increasingly volatile and tense.

Unaccompanied minors have to register with the authorities before they can be moved to the "container" camp, a fenced-off area that has been allocated for children to stay in shipping containers while the rest of the Jungle is destroyed. About 800 children have already been moved into this area, but registration closed at approximately 12:30 p.m. local time with dozens of children left outside and no further information given.

"Refugees and unaccompanied children have been lining up in a calm and orderly way so far, but there's a huge amount of confusion and lack of information," said Dorothy Sang, a Save the Children aid worker in the camp. "In the last hour the situation has become increasingly tense. There is a massive police presence here and diggers appear to be moving into the camp now, so it's potentially very frightening for the children who don't have a place to stay yet."

Save the Children is also concerned about the children who are in the "container camp", which child protection charities have not been able to access. As the main camp is demolished around them, vulnerable children will lose access to the adults and services that have supported them.

"The French authorities' demolition of the Calais jungle is being rushed through without due care being taken to protect extremely vulnerable children," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "This is a dereliction of responsibility, which is exposing children to acute risks.

"When a part of the camp was demolished earlier this year, 129 children went missing. We don't know what happened to them. There is every chance that this could happen again but on a bigger scale. We are urging the authorities to halt the demolition until they register and can protect the more than a 1,000 children in the camp."

Miles added: "We are really pleased to see a significant number of unaccompanied children from Calais being given a safe haven in the UK, but are deeply concerned for the fate of hundreds of children who remain."

Save the Children has been working with the Refugee Youth Service in Calais to set up information points across the camp today along the path that children should be taking to the registration point. However with no clear guidance from the authorities it is unclear where to send children tonight, or what the process will be tomorrow.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Child Refugee Crisis Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 24, 2016) — Tomorrow’s planned demolition of "The Jungle" camp in Calais should be halted immediately until every child is accounted for and found a safe place to stay.

Save the Children’s call comes amid reports from staff on the ground that vulnerable children have been left in limbo after registration for children was halted earlier today. The move has resulted in confusion for hundreds of children who have been left not knowing where to sleep tonight and uncertain about the process for registration to move on from the camp. There were approximately 1,300 children living in squalid conditions in the camp, but if demolition proceeds before children are identified and made safe, Save the Children warns that many children may disappear.

Save the Children is urging British and French authorities to work closely together to ensure children’s safety is prioritized. That means ensuring children have a safe place to stay tonight, and when registration restarts in the morning, that children are given a separate, safe route to registering, so they aren’t caught up in lines of thousands of adults.

"It is extremely welcome to see vulnerable children who have been trapped in Calais reaching safe haven in the UK over the last week," Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children, said. "But as night falls in Calais, we are deeply concerned for the fate of hundreds of children who remain, and who do not know where they will sleep tonight and have no information on what tomorrow will bring.

"It is unacceptable that the French operation to demolish the camp, which has been planned for weeks, now risks putting vulnerable children at greater risk. We are deeply concerned that children are being directed to stay in an area in the camp called Le CAP, which children’s agencies do not have access to and which may expose them to violence or abuse. There is no way the demolition can start until all children have been properly identified and provided for – to do otherwise would be unconscionable."

Save the Children has been working with the Refugee Youth Service in Calais to set up information points across the camp today along the path that children should be taking to the registration point. However, with no clear guidance from the authorities, it is unclear where to send children tonight, or what the process will be tomorrow.

"Children urgently need secure spaces to stay and to be supported through a clear, safe process for registration and assessment to check whether they can be reunited with family members, or where it is in their best interests to be offered sanctuary in the UK," Miles added.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 21, 2016) — Aid workers and medical professionals in East Aleppo are reporting the widespread use of cluster bombs in recent months, weapons that are banned under International Humanitarian Law. Despite "humanitarian pauses" taking place in Aleppo today, concerns are mounting about the increased number of children already injured by explosive weaponry who may be too unwell to leave or untreatable in the existing medical facilities which have been battered in the recent bombardment.

A month on from the collapse of the ceasefire in East Aleppo, Save the Children is warning that it is primarily the deadly use of explosive weapons — including cluster bombs — which has led to more than 136 children being killed and 397 wounded since September 23.[1]

The Violations Documentation Center, which documents human rights violations in Syria, recorded 137 cluster bomb attacks in Aleppo from September 10 to October 10 — a 791 percent increase compared to the average of the previous eight months. Across Syria, they report that 130 children have been killed due to cluster bombs in the past year. Syria Civil Defence (White Helmets) report that there were 163 cluster bomb attacks in Aleppo governorate during September.

Save the Children cannot independently verify or confirm these figures and accurate data collection is currently very challenging in East Aleppo, but other sources on the ground report sustained used of cluster bombs since the ceasefire collapsed on September 18.

Cluster bombs are dropped from the air or fired from the ground and scatter multiple submunitions, or bomblets indiscriminately over a wide area — approximately the size of a football field.

Often bomblets fail to explode on impact and are handled by curious children. According to Cluster Munitions Monitor[2], globally some 40 percent of victims of cluster bombs are children, often injured or killed long after direct hostilities end.

The impact of cluster munitions on children’s bodies can be devastating. Surgeons say that at close range, a bomblet can tear off a child’s limbs, blind them or fracture bones. From further away, fragments or ball bearings will embed in the body, usually in the muscles.

"Not all the bomblets explode, and usually they look like a ball or something that a child would play with," Firas*, head of the Organization for Removing Explosives and Remnants of War in East Aleppo, said. "They are mines waiting to explode at any moment, stuck on roofs and windows or lying in playgrounds and parks. There are many cases of amputations in Aleppo city because of this."

"Sometimes 20-30 ball bearings are coming at children, which tears off their arms and legs," Dr. David Nott, a trauma surgeon who has worked in Syria and who advises surgeons in East Aleppo remotely, said. "The ones slightly away from where the bomb lands get them embedded all over their body — they mostly end up in the muscles."

With only an estimated 35 medics left in East Aleppo, doctors only have the time and resources currently to treat the most critical patients whose injuries are life threatening, so fragments such as ball bearings are reportedly often being left in children.

"There’s no time to take them out right now in East Aleppo, the doctors have to make rational decisions. But leaving them in can result in massive infection and sepsis," Dr. Nott added.

Save the Children supports global implementation of the 2008 Convention on Cluster Munitions, which comprehensively prohibits the use of these deadly weapons. However, cluster bombs have continued to be used to devastating effect in Syria. According to Human Rights Watch, cluster munition attacks in Syria have significantly increased since September 2015.

"In Syria today, there are young children with freshly amputated limbs or with ball bearings embedded in their muscle tissue because of the use of these appalling and indiscriminate weapons," Sonia Khush, Syria Director at Save the Children said. "Cluster bombs and other explosive weapons with a wide-area impact have no place in any conflict.

"International Humanitarian Law has been consistently violated during the conflict in Syria, from the bombing of schools and hospitals to indiscriminate attacks on civilians. We have to do more to protect children from the carnage of this war. If there is one thing the warring parties must agree on immediately, it should be to end the use of cluster munitions and to allow access to aid agencies so that we can evacuate injured children.

"There must also be accountability for what’s happening to them in Aleppo. Save the Children wants to see urgent investigations launched to establish the full scale of horrific attacks perpetrated in Aleppo and the indiscriminate attacks on civilian infrastructure."

In addition to calling for a halt to cluster munitions in any area and under any circumstance, Save the Children is also pushing for an end to the use of explosive weapons in populated areas because of the civilian harm this practice causes.

[1] Figures are taken from the Aleppo Health Directorate from 23 Sep to 17 Oct. These figures are believed to be an underestimation of the actual child casualties as they only record the incidences of children who have presented at hospitals. Also note that it was not possible for the AHD to record figures daily.
[2] http://www.the-monitor.org/en-gb/our-research/cluster-munition-monitor.aspx

* Pseudonym used for security reasons

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Arcade Superplay Expo, a 48-Hour Charity Stream, to Take Place October 21-23

Arcade SuperPlay Expo

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Oct. 21, 2016) — Save the Children announced today that more than 20 superstars in the world of classic arcade games will come together at Twitch headquarters in San Francisco from Oct. 21-23 for Arcade Superplay Expo, a 48-hour livestream event of world-class arcade play to benefit Save the Children.

Thirty-six years after the American debut of Pac-Man, Save the Children and Twitch will commemorate this historic event in arcade game history by organizing a throwback arcade game marathon. Combining the popular arcade games of the 1980’s with the new technology of the 21st century, Arcade Superplay Expo was created by gamers for the gaming community to give back to children in need.

World-record holders in games such as Donkey Kong and Super Mario Bros. will look to set new records during Arcade Superplay Expo, which will raise funds to help children in need in the U.S. and around the world. Scheduled players include Wes Copeland (Donkey Kong world record holder), Robbie Lakeman, Hector Fly, Andrew G, PJ DiCesare, LordBBH, DeadFlip, KevinDDR and PHNIX, among others.

These players’ dexterity, hand-eye coordination and speed of gameplay will be on display for all to watch via a stream broadcasted live on Twitch all weekend at http://www.twitch.tv/superplay.

Viewers can cheer players on and watch their favorite games while donating to a worthy cause. Donations can be made at http://www.bit.ly/asx2016.

"We are honored to be selected as the charity beneficiary for what we hope will be an annual event with Twitch’s arcade game community," said Ettore Rossetti, Save the Children’s senior director of Social Business Strategy & Innovation. "Not only will the event will be incredibly fun for the participants, viewers and donors, but it will also raise valuable funding for serious issues affecting kids in the U.S. and around the world. This is a win-win situation for all."

In 2012, Save the Children created "Be a LifeForce," an initiative for gamers, streamers and vloggers to raise money for kids, while playing videogames and streaming online. The initiative has raised more than $5 million over the past four years, and when combined with matching grants has helped fund more than $20 million towards Save the Children’s global programs.

"When it comes to charity events, we love seeing how passionate and supportive the Twitch community is, primarily in terms of the organizations, players and viewers who collectively contribute to the experience," said Andrew Schroeder, Charity Events Manager, Twitch. "Since Save the Children’s Arcade Superplay Expo is for a great cause, opening our doors and helping them stream from our headquarters was an easy decision to make."

The livestream event is free and open to the public, and will run from Friday, Oct. 21 at 6 p.m. PST to Sunday, Oct. 23 at 6 p.m. PST. The event at Twitch headquarters is by invitation only. View the schedule here: https://horaro.org/superplay2016/schedule.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 21, 2016) — More than 165,000 vulnerable children risk violence, forced recruitment and separation from their families, as thousands leave Dadaab refugee camp ahead of its planned closure, Save the Children warns.

While the camp’s population currently stands at nearly 277,000 – 60 percent of whom are children – tens of thousands of parents and children have already returned to Somalia in the last year following news that the camp would close in November.

Save the Children is hearing of an increasing number of children confronted with violence upon returning to war-torn Somalia.

Mohamed, 14, and Aden, 13, were intercepted by an armed group on their way back to Somalia. Their father, who tried to stop their abduction, was killed in the process and their mother narrowly escaped death and fled to Ethiopia.

"After our father’s murder, we were taken to a military training camp in Baardheere. We were beaten and denied food if we failed to follow instructions," said Aden.

The brothers escaped and were arrested by military forces but later released without charge, and made their way back to Dadaab alone.

"I will never go back to Somalia again," adds Aden. "I am sure the militia must be looking for us and this time they will not take us to the training camp but they will kill us."

Without their parents, the brothers are currently struggling to access essential services like food and shelter as they wait for their ration cards to be reactivated.

Another child, Abdullahi, 6, witnessed his neighbour being killed by a missile shortly after returning to Somalia. "There was a huge blast. I stepped out of our house and saw body parts scattered all over,’’ says Abdullahi.

While the family has since returned to Dadaab, Abdullahi’s mother says he has been having nightmares, and regularly screams at night.

Many children in Dadaab are also being forced to abandon school, depriving them of an opportunity to learn.

Ahmed, 18, told Save the Children that a return to Somalia means he will be forced to fight in the war one way or another. "I know there are only two alternatives: either I join the government forces or an extremist group. There is no education in Somalia. We don’t know whether we will do exams or get our certificates because of the repatriation. Most of us have lost hope."

Refugees returning to Somalia are facing an uncertain future in a country still grappling with conflict, where essential services needed to support their return are poor or non-existent.

"The residents of Dadaab have been living in fear and confusion since the announced closure of the camp forced families to accelerate plans to move back to Somalia," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "I’ve visited Dadaab multiple times over the years, and have seen first-hand that this refugee camp has not only become home for these hundreds of thousands of people, but for many of the children and young adults, it’s the only home they’ve ever known."

"Imagine being told you suddenly have no home. It has created a sense of panic and forced families to make perilous journeys, only to return to a conflict zone. These decisions, made under huge duress, are putting their and their children’s lives at risk. These children have little or no say in how this affects them and their future," continued Miles.

"They are saying goodbye to their community, livelihoods, and their home only to face violence, homelessness and uncertainty about their futures."

To ensure the protection and safety and all refugee children in Dadaab, Save the Children is calling for:

• The Governments of Kenya and Somalia and UNHCR to re-negotiate and extend the Tripartite Agreement – which was signed in November 2013 between the Governments of Kenya and Somalia and UNHCR to facilitate the voluntary repatriation of Somali refugees from Kenya to Somalia — so that all returns are safe, dignified and voluntary;

• The Government of Kenya to clearly communicate to all refugees that Dadaab will remain open past November. The government should also allow all students registered in the camp to take their national examinations in November 2016, and work with the Government of Somalia and education systems in both countries to find solutions to enable students in grades 6 and 7 who return to Somalia to take their Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) exams in the future;

• Donors and the international community to prioritize funding for the voluntary repatriation process, for ongoing support for those living in Dadaab, and to ensure acceptable levels of service for refugees once they return to Somalia. They must also ensure there are enough funds for child protection, education services and viable livelihood opportunities, so that children’s well-being is guaranteed;

• UNHCR to publicly confirm and reassure refugees that the full, enhanced financial voluntary repatriation package will remain available in 2017. They must also ensure all refugees are informed about educational opportunities available to them in the areas they are returning to, and that the necessary funds are in place to support children who are at risk of separation, or have been separated from their families;

• The UN and non-governmental agencies working in Dadaab and Somalia to ensure the entire repatriation process is done in the best interests of the child – including guarantees that appropriate services and support systems will be in place once they return to Somalia – so that children are protected throughout the repatriation process. They must also ensure that children have continued access to quality basic education and are protected, both in Dadaab and in areas of return in Somalia.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Save the Children’s Search and Rescue Vessel Returns from its Latest Mission in Mediterranean

Search and Rescue
Refugees and migrants are rescued from the Sea by the Vos Hestia.
Photo Credit: Save the Children

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (October 20, 2016) — Save the Children’s search and rescue ship, the Vos Hestia, is returning to Italy with more than 200 refugees and migrants rescued in two separate operations off the North African coast. Sadly, among them are the bodies of five people who perished before rescuers could reach the first boat in distress.

"We received a call to assist in the rescue of a wooden boat in distress," said Gillian Moyes, Save the Children’s team leader on the Vos Hestia. "When we arrived on the scene, five people had already died. The bodies and the survivors were transferred onto our ship from a navy vessel."

The Vos Hestia was then called to assist in a second rescue, which took place over several hours at night. In total, more than 200 people were brought on board, including pregnant women, and a large number of lone children and families with children as young as one year old.

"This tragic event once again highlights the dangers faced by those crossing the Mediterranean Sea to seek the safety of Europe," added Ms. Moyes.

"So far in 2016, more than 3,600 people have drowned while attempting this treacherous journey. The continuing loss of life clearly shows how search and rescue operations capacity must be a primary focus of the European response to save all lives at risk."

Save the Children has provided fresh water, food and blankets to everyone on board. The survivors of the first rescue, in particular, are being assisted by the medical and child protection teams to ensure they receive the specific support they need following such a harrowing event.

Vos Hestia will arrive at the port of Catania in Sicily on October 21. Save the Children staff will be present to help with the disembarkation process and will continue to work to ensure children have access to their basic needs and rights.

Save the Children has launched an online crowdfunding campaign to allow people around the world to support our life-saving search and rescue efforts. Individuals can learn more and contribute to our work to save more lives at sea at http://www.savethechildren.org/rescue.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Save the Children to Provide Education Support for Children in Most Affected Areas

Children's Emergency Fund

No one knows when or where the next crisis will occur. Help provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 20, 2016) – Hundreds of thousands of people have been affected by Typhoon Haima which tore through the Philippines overnight, with reports of widespread devastation including flattened homes, damaged schools and toppled trees.

With winds gusting at up to 200 miles per hour, Haima was the most powerful storm to enter the Philippines’ territory since Super Typhoon Haiyan in 2013, which killed more than 7,000 people. However, thankfully Typhoon Haima weakened from a category 5 storm to category 4 just before making landfall, and is now tracking west towards Hong Kong and mainland China.

"Certainly tens of thousands of homes have been damaged," said Ned Olney, Save the Children Country Director in the Philippines. "Families have been displaced and we are concerned about the safety and protection of children during this time. Children are always most vulnerable during a crisis like this. We are working with the local and national authorities to identify the families and areas with the greatest needs."

More than 90,000 people in Luzon were evacuated before the storm struck, and at least seven regions suspended all school classes. Currently, 92 schools are being used as evacuation centers, and there have been reports of widespread power outages and impassable roads.

Save the Children teams are en route to the worst affected areas to assess the damage, and will provide whatever assistance is required.

"We need to be on the lookout for secondary impacts. With dams releasing water, we anticipate flooding not only in areas centrally hit by the typhoon, but also in low-lying areas of northern and central Luzon," Mr. Olney said.

"At this stage it looks like the government will be able to meet the immediate needs of those impacted by the typhoon, and so it’s likely we will provide vital education support to help children get back to school as quickly as possible.

"The classroom is commonly the best place for children after experiencing a distressing event like a typhoon as it’s a safe space to see their friends and teachers and to regain a sense of normality. The sooner children can get back to class the better."

Save the Children has a long history responding to disasters in the Philippines, including typhoons Koppu in 2015, Hagupit in 2014 and Haiyan in 2013.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Iraqi Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 19, 2016) — Thousands of desperate Iraqis are fleeing to a filthy and overcrowded Syrian refugee camp in an effort to escape the Mosul offensive, according to Save the Children’s team on the ground in northeast Syria.

About 5,000 people, mostly women and children, have arrived at the Al Hol Camp from the Mosul area in the last 10 days, and at least 1,000 more are now massing at the border waiting to cross.

Save the Children field staff who visited the camp last week spoke of dire conditions. The camp was littered with waste and feces, with a looming risk of disease outbreaks as a result. There were just 16 latrines shared by more than 9,000 people.

Lines of dehydrated families stretched for more than 100 yards as they waited for trucks of dirty, untreated water — and one man told field staff they would often be left without even those supplies for up to two days at a time.

"These families arrive with nothing but the clothes on their backs and find almost nothing to help them," said Tarik Kadir, head of Save the Children’s response to the Mosul crisis. "The camp is bursting at the seams and risks being overwhelmed. Conditions there are among the worst we’ve seen, and we expect thousands more people to be on their way soon."

The UN is warning that 100,000 people may arrive in Syria from around Mosul.

Save the Children’s teams in northeast Syria are bringing in water and sanitation systems, and urgently establishing child protection activities.

There are currently no safe areas or education services in the camp for children who have faced two years of IS rule and a perilous journey to safety.

Funding is urgently needed to respond to the growing needs. The UN’s emergency appeal for Mosul and Save the Children’s own response to the crisis are currently only about half funded.

To support Save the Children’s work in response to the Mosul offensive, please visit: www.savethechildren.org/iraq.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



"Consistent, dangerous gap" for children after U.S disasters

Hurricane Matthew-Carolinas
A playground underwater in Lumberton, NC on Oct. 14 after severe flooding from Hurricane Matthew. Credit: Holly Spicer/Save the Children

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.247.6610 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (Oct. 19, 2016) — Scores of flooded child care centers in North and South Carolina cannot tap official disaster recovery support, putting children’s safety and wellbeing at risk while families struggle to rebuild, Save the Children said.

"The fact that most child care doesn’t qualify as an ‘essential service’ in U.S. disaster recovery creates a consistent, dangerous gap for America’s most vulnerable disaster-affected children," said Bill Corwin, Save the Children’s vice president of U.S. Programs. "We’re very concerned about how this gap will play out for children and families in the Carolinas after Hurricane Matthew."

While government funding helps schools and Head Start centers rebuild and reopen to children quickly after disasters, no such support is available to for-profit child care centers, which account for the majority of child care centers in America. Independently-run centers typically run on tight margins, are often underinsured and unable to qualify for small business loans due to poor credit or lack of collateral. Even when such centers are properly insured, the claims process can take many months, leaving them unable to reopen quickly to serve children in disaster-affected communities.

As it has after many other recent U.S. disasters, Save the Children is working to close the child care recovery gap in North and South Carolina by identifying damaged child care centers that serve the most marginalized families, and helping them recover and reopen.

"The stress and chaos that follows a disaster like these floods puts enormous emotional strains on young children, and, if not alleviated, puts their continued healthy development at risk," Corwin said. "The need for safe, nurturing care and a daily routine has never been greater for many children in the Carolinas right now. At the same time, families need to rebuild and get back to work to support their families. They need safe, dependable child care to do that."

Challenges to post-disaster child care recovery has strained families in many recent U.S. disasters, including the Louisiana flooding this summer that forced 86 child care centers serving 6,000 children to close, according to Child Care Aware of America. Save the Children has raised funds to help 22 of those Baton-Rouge-area centers replace lost learning materials, equipment and furniture that are essential to safe, quality care. After Hurricane Sandy, 697 child care providers had to close for one to eight months, according to Child Care Aware. With the generous support of donors, Save the Children helped more than 100 New York and New Jersey child care centers reopen.

In its Hurricane Matthew response in the Carolinas, Save the Children is targeting hard-hit communities with high poverty rates, including in Robeson County, North Carolina and Dillon and Florence counties in South Carolina.

Save the Children also responded to last year’s floods in South Carolina, where it also serves nearly 5,000 children through its long-term early education and literacy programs.

To support Save the Children’s response to Hurricane Matthew – both domestically and in Haiti — please visit: www.SavetheChildren.org/Matthew.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (October 18, 2016) – One month since the breakdown of the Aleppo ceasefire, more than 500 children have been reported to have been killed or seriously injured. Hospitals have documented 136 deaths resulting from the recent bombardment in the east of the besieged city and 397 serious injuries. Many more deaths are believed to have gone unreported. The intensified bombardment of the city has isolated an estimated 100,000 children who are in need of food, clean water and urgent medical care.

Save the Children is using this moment to press the world to protect Aleppo’s children. Vigils will be held in Aleppo, New York, Berlin, Toronto and Geneva to show the outrage felt at the disregard for children’s lives, and to commemorate the hundreds of children killed or seriously injured since the end of the last ceasefire. In Aleppo, where it’s too dangerous to bring together groups of people for fear they will be targeted by bombardment, children and families are individually commemorating the suffering and call for an end to the bloodshed and an immediate ceasefire. Despite reports of an eight-hour pause in the airstrikes in Aleppo, this will not be enough time to get aid in or evacuate injured children before the fighting resumes.

"What is happening to children in Aleppo and across Syria, is one of the defining political and moral challenges of our age," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "Continued failure to protect children is jeopardizing the whole system of International Humanitarian Law. Without urgent action, this will become one of the darkest episodes in our history."

Throughout the conflict in Syria, hospitals, schools and other civilian structures have come under repeated bombardment and children and other civilians have paid the highest price. People are blocked from leaving, and life-saving aid from entering. Conditions for trapped civilians have become intolerable, and many have been without sustenance for months.

Miles said: “The world cannot look away while these children are in grave danger. The world has failed children in Syria for too long and there must now be a concerted effort by all sides to get them out of harm’s way as the situation in Aleppo worsens. History will judge us by how we respond.”

Save the Children is calling for an immediate 72-hour ceasefire in Syria as a first step, to allow adequate time for the urgent evacuation of the sick and injured and for desperately needed humanitarian aid to reach children and families. The aid agency also calls for an investigation to be launched to establish the facts around indiscriminate attacks on schools, hospitals and other civilian infrastructure in Aleppo.

Note to editors: *Figures are taken from the Aleppo Health Directorate from September 23- October 17. These figures are believed to be an underestimation of the actual child casualties as they only record the incidences of children who have presented at hospitals. Also note that it was not possible for the AHD to record figures daily.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Children's Emergency Fund

No one knows when or where the next crisis will occur. Help provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 18, 2016) — The Philippines is preparing to face its strongest storm yet this year, with destructive winds and flash flooding expected in the country’s north.

The Philippine weather bureau forecasts that Typhoon Haima, a Category 5 storm, is set to make landfall in northeastern Luzon in the early hours of Thursday morning, by which time it could pack winds of up to 160 miles per hour.

"Typhoon Haima is bearing down on the northern Philippines and looks capable of causing significant damage to homes, and community infrastructure," warned Ned Olney, Save the Children’s Country Director in the Philippines.

"Save the Children is closely monitoring the storm as it tracks toward the country and we stand ready to respond if required. With such powerful winds and many homes situated along the coast, the potential for damage is high."

Save the Children has large stockpiles of relief items located in warehouses across the country, including thousands of emergency shelter kits, hygiene kits, water and sanitation items and essential household items.

"We are ready to respond immediately if required, and will be assessing the damage and humanitarian needs as soon as the storm has passed," Olney said. "We are always really concerned about the impact of storms like Typhoon Haima on children, who are particularly vulnerable during emergencies."

Save the Children has a long history responding to disasters in the Philippines, including typhoons Koppu in 2015, Hagupit in 2014 and Haiyan in 2013.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Iraqi Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (October 17, 2016) — As Iraqi and coalition forces close in on Mosul, the lives of more than half a million children now hang in the balance.

Aram Shakaram, Save the Children’s Deputy Country Director in Iraq, said: "Unless safe routes to escape the fighting are established, many families will have no choice but to stay and risk being killed by crossfire or bombardment, trapped beyond the reach of humanitarian aid with little food or medical care. Those who try to flee will be forced to navigate a city covered with booby traps, snipers and hidden landmines. Without immediate action to ensure people can flee safely, we are likely to see bloodshed of civilians on a massive scale."

Military commanders have asked vulnerable families and children to stay inside and put white flags on their homes. At best this is impractical in a brutal urban conflict. At worst, it risks civilian buildings being turned into military positions and families being used as human shields.

Families inside Mosul say they cannot afford to buy food, water and basic medical supplies, and have been preparing shelters inside their homes in case of bombardment. Many say they are too scared to leave the city until the roads out are secured.

Save the Children is calling for safe routes out of the city to be immediately identified and maintained, and cleared of deadly explosives.

"Vast sums of money have been spent on military planning, equipment and ordinance — but an investment in the safety of children must be the priority," said Shakaram.

If people do manage to escape, they also face an uncertain situation. At the moment camps are ready for only around 60,000 people — a tiny fraction of the up to 1 million people who could flee Mosul. The UN’s emergency appeal is still only half funded, but camps could be overwhelmed within days.

Save the Children teams are already seeing people making dangerous journeys to get out ahead of the offensive. Thousands of families are escaping the area around Hawija and at least 5,000 people have fled villages around Mosul and crossed into northeast Syria in the past week, and are living in desperate conditions across the border. Save the Children is providing emergency water supplies, dried food, soap and other items to newly displaced families.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Iraqi Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD Conn. (October 14, 2016) – Children are dying of thirst or being killed by stepping on makeshift landmines as families desperately try to escape fresh fighting on the road to Mosul, Save the Children field staff are reporting.

Aid workers at a reception center in Hayakal, south of the town of Hawija, said they saw a baby arrive minutes away from death due to acute dehydration. Other children arrived barefoot following a grueling 36-hour trek to safety through territory laced with Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) planted by the Islamic State group. One family said they lost two children to hidden explosives. They were unable to retrieve the bodies for fear of additional landmines in the area.

Thousands of people have already abandoned areas around Hawija as Iraqi and coalition forces fight to clear IS-held territory on the route to Mosul. Save the Children expects 90,000 to flee Hawija in the coming days as the offensive escalates.

"Children are arriving from Hawija on the verge of death," said Aram Shakaram, Save the Children’s Deputy Country Director in Iraq. "Food in the area is running out and they are hungry, thirsty and absolutely exhausted, having walked barefoot through mountains full of landmines and IS patrols. Our team heard of a woman and her 17-year-old nephew who collapsed and died just a few kilometers away from help."

When Save the Children arrived in Hayakal, families who had made it to safety were being forced to wait for hours on the ground in the searing heat, with little access to food or water.

Save the Children is now providing safe water and supplies for new arrivals, although insecurity and a lack of funds continues to seriously hamper the humanitarian response. A United Nations appeal for Mosul is currently less than half funded.

"This is just the start and we fear it is going to get much worse," Shakaram added. "The conditions for people fleeing Hawija are an early warning sign of what will happen when far greater numbers flee Mosul itself.

"Participants in the military operation must ensure that families have safe routes to escape active areas of conflict and get food, water and shelter. At the moment, families are forced to risk their lives whether they stay or flee."

Up to one million people are expected to flee Mosul when Iraqi and coalition forces launch a final push for the city. The UN estimates 700,000 will be in desperate need of emergency aid in what is expected to be Iraq’s largest humanitarian crisis in years.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (October 14, 2016) — As world leaders meet in Lausanne to discuss the carnage in Aleppo, children continue to be killed in the east of the city at a rate of more than six a day. As they discuss the fate of the city’s civilians, at least 18 children will be injured and require urgent medical care, based on current casualty rates.*

Save the Children’s President & CEO Carolyn Miles has joined forces with David Miliband, CEO of The International Rescue Committee, Jan Egeland, CEO of the Norwegian Refugee Council and Winnie Byanyima, CEO of Oxfam International to write an open letter to the delegates, saying the continued failure to protect Aleppo’s civilians is jeopardizing the whole system of international humanitarian law.

The four leading international NGOs call on the leaders meeting to establish a ceasefire of at least 72 hours in East Aleppo as a first priority. This will allow the sick and wounded to be evacuated, and for food and medical aid to enter the besieged area. Just stopping the violence is not enough — this time, aid must get through to the civilians who desperately need it.

Carolyn Miles said: "The world is watching what’s happening in Lausanne today. We have failed Syria’s children for too long and there must be accountability for what’s happening to them in Aleppo.

"Since the last ceasefire collapsed, more than 130 children have been killed in Eastern Aleppo and almost 400 injured in relentless and indiscriminate bombing — many can’t receive treatment for their appalling injures because hospitals have run out of even basic medicine and equipment. The children of Aleppo cannot wait for a war of words to play out; time is running out for them."

A 72-hour ceasefire is an essential first step to deliver aid and evacuate civilians who want to leave East Aleppo, but it must be the prelude to an intensified diplomatic effort by all sides to end the conflict. Save the Children wants to see urgent investigations launched to establish the full scale of horrific attacks perpetrated in Aleppo and the indiscriminate attacks on civilian infrastructure.

* In the 21 days from September 23rd, approximately 136 children killed and 382 have been injured in East Aleppo according to figures from the Aleppo Health Directorate. These figures only record the child casualties who have presented at hospitals.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Hurricane Matthew - Father and baby

Hurricane Matthew Children's Relief Fund

Media Contacts
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)


FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 14, 2016) — 1.4 million Haitian people, including 600,000 children, are in need of immediate humanitarian assistance following Hurricane Matthew last week. Save the Children is rapidly scaling up operations from its base in Camp Perrin and has deployed teams to provide initial relief.

By the end of the week, Save the Children aims to have helped 5,000 people with immediate needs including food, clean water, hygiene supplies, household items, mosquito nets, jerry cans and baby items.

"Many families have lost everything—loved ones, homes and crops," said Kevin Novotny, Save the Children’s Country Director in Haiti. "We are increasing the size of our response and working closely with the Haitian and U.S. governments and other partners to ensure that the most vulnerable get the help they so desperately need."

In addition, Save the Children’s Emergency Health Unit, staffed with trained doctors, nurses, midwives and a nutrition advisor, is working to establish cholera treatment units and has three mobile health teams deployed to help meet people’s basic and reproductive health needs.

Save the Children is seeking support from individual and corporate donors to help safeguard the health and safety of thousands of dislocated children and families who have survived the initial disaster but face severe challenges in the days ahead.

"For the affected children in Haiti, the immediate needs are enormous," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "We are concerned about children’s ability to get food, clean water and safe shelter, as well as the risk of cholera, psychological trauma and gender-based violence."

Save the Children’s work in Haiti spans more than 40 years, and during the past two years the agency has operated programs in eight communes across Grand’ Anse and Sud, two areas hardest hit by the storm. We have developed strong ties along these coastal areas, supporting 27 schools in some of the most disadvantaged communities.

To support Save the Children’s work in response to Hurricane Matthew – both in Haiti and domestically, in the Carolinas – please visit: savethechildren.org/Matthew

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



International Day of the Girl is Observed Worldwide Annually on Oct. 11

Empire State Building Lighting
Dakota Fanning and Save The Children girl supporters at the Empire State Building lighting ceremony in honor of International Day of the Girl.
Credit: Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Save The Children

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

NEW YORK (Oct. 11, 2016) – Save the Children Artist Ambassador Dakota Fanning lit the world-famous Empire State Building red on Tuesday, Oct. 11, in a special ceremony celebrating International Day of the Girl. Marked globally by the United Nations, International Day of the Girl is a designated day for communities and policymakers to discuss how to end discrimination against girls and create opportunities for girls to reach their full potential. By lighting the Empire State Building red, Save the Children is raising awareness of these issues and illuminating the need to educate and empower girls around the world.

Fanning was joined by Carolyn Miles, Save the Children’s president & CEO, a group of girls from the New York Tri-State area, who are Save the Children child sponsors, and a sponsored girl from South Carolina. The Empire State Building will light up today at sunset to recognize girls and the unique challenges they face globally.

"Worldwide, girls are far more likely to miss out on school, marry too early and grow up too fast. People often talk about women’s empowerment, but that begins with girls. Together, we need to do more to ensure every last girl has a childhood, and a better and brighter future," said Carolyn Miles, president & CEO of Save the Children. "That’s why today, on International Day of the Girl, Save the Children is shining a light on girls."

Throughout the world, girls are frequently marginalized in their families, communities and societies. By lighting the Empire State Building red, Save the Children aims to raise awareness of these issues and illuminate the need to educate and empower girls around the world.

"Every girl deserves to follow her dreams no matter where she comes from or what her circumstances are," said Fanning, known for roles in notable films such as "I Am Sam," "The Runaways," "The Twilight Saga" and the upcoming "American Pastoral." "The first step in doing that is bringing attention to the barriers girls face globally. The second step is empowering young girls to reach their full potential. This is why I am here today, honoring International Day of the Girl and lighting up the Empire State Building with Save the Children."

Save the Children believes that reaching girls is a critical component of ending early marriage, preventable maternal and child deaths and ensuring our collective future. The Save the Children sponsorship program, in particular, helps provide girls and boys with the necessities for a healthy and successful start to their life – nutrition, early childhood and adolescent development, education and school health. To join Fanning as a child sponsor and learn more, please visit https://sponsor.savethechildren.org/.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Delphine Diallo Photo Series
Photo: Delphine Diallo

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Oct. 4, 2016) — An evocative new photo series by up-and-coming photographer and artist Delphine Diallo depicting stories of female sexual exploitation and abuse has been released to mark International Day of the Girl. The images were captured at La Maison Rose, a safe-house supported by Save the Children in Dakar, Senegal, where the women and girls are currently seeking shelter.

French-Senegalese artist Diallo held workshops at La Maison Rose to encourage girls to express themselves through collage, which she then used to frame each portrait and punctuate elements of their life stories. The final set of images bears witness not only to the abuse experienced personally by the women and girls in the pictures, but by many women around the world on a daily basis.

The project comes as Save the Children releases its new report, Every Last Girl: Free to live, free to learn, free from harm. It highlights the dangers facing girls around the world and includes an index ranking the hardest places to be a girl according to levels of child marriage, schooling, teen pregnancy, maternal deaths and number of women representatives in national government.

Senegal ranks in the bottom third of all countries according to the new index. While great progress has been made for equality – Senegal has the second highest number of women representatives in national government in Africai – a third of all girls are still married before the age of 18ii , a quarter of girls and women aged 15 to 49 have undergone female genital mutilationiii, and sexual and gender based violence against women and girls continues to be a major problem across the country, according to the United Nationsiv.

Speaking about the photo series, Delphine Diallo said: "I wanted to combine photography with collage for this project because sometimes photography is too basic to tell a story. The process of collage allowed these women and girls to assume control and identity within the images, making it a very participatory project.

"The energy in the room during the art workshops was intense because a lot of these women have suffered so much and everything they created was super personal. Some of the women incorporated images of death and pain, but also decorated the collages with such beauty. They were very expressive and I hope the process was therapeutic and helps them on their journey to heal.

"The house, La Maison Rose, is so calming. The colours are beautiful, children run around happily, so it really feels like a haven where women and girls can come to relax and heal and create a positive future. It was inspiring for me to see, and I hope this comes through in the images. Everywhere I go in the world, I am always surprised by women’s strength and resilience, and here was no different."

Dr Bonzi Mathurin, Save the Children’s Country Director in Senegal, said: "La Maison Rose is doing excellent work supporting and healing incredibly vulnerable women and girls from Dakar and beyond. Many of them have suffered unimaginable violence, abuse and mistreatment simply because they were born a girl. We hope these images will raise awareness for the need to end violations against women and girls, not just across Senegal but around the world."

La Maison Rose supports women and girls who have been victims of domestic and sexual abuse, exploitation, trafficking or have been living on the streets. It provides the young women, many of whom have children, with accommodation, health and psychological support needed to rebuild their lives and reintegrate into society.

While at the house, its residents are given access to essential services including medical care, counselling and legal advice, as well as psychological support through activities such as yoga, art workshops and gardening. The center also provides career advice and skills training to help them to earn a living once they leave the shelter.

i World Bank. 43% of national parliament seats are held by women in Senegal (second highest in Africa after Rwanda).
ii Save the Children (2016), Every Last Girl: Free to live, free to learn, free from harm.
iii UNICEF (2016), Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: A Global Concern.
iv United Nations http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=15857&LangID=E

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Hurricane Matthew

Hurricane Matthew Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 10, 2016) — As the death toll in Haiti from Hurricane Matthew continues to mount by the hour, Save the Children has joined the ministry of health, other major humanitarian aid organizations and UN agencies in calling for an expedited response to the disaster including providing immediate relief supplies to head off a catastrophic outbreak of cholera.

"Right now our biggest concern is cholera, a deadly and highly infectious disease. The number of cases is increasing with every new report," said Dr. Unni Krishnan, director of Save the Children’s Emergency Health Unit in Haiti. "Flooding and contaminated water caused by the storm pose a huge threat to survivors including thousands of children. Clean water and medicine delivered to the hardest hit areas in the next 24 to 48 hours is a key priority."

Added Krishnan: "Quick decisions and strong leadership can make or break relief operations. Right now, one million people need urgent humanitarian assistance. Life-saving measures such as medical aid, clean water and appropriate information should remain the priority at this stage."

Save the Children health workers have been responding to cholera outbreaks in Haiti since 2010, following a massive earthquake, by training more than 200 health workers and reaching out to more than 17,000 residents. Krishnan noted that the impact of Hurricane Matthew now poses a huge additional threat to cholera reduction efforts.

Save the Children is also concerned about an estimated 130,000 Haitian children out of school. Early estimates are that 50 percent of the 131 schools which Save the Children supports in Sud, Grand’ Anse and Port au Prince have been damaged.

"It is imperative that children return to school as soon as possible," said Kevin Novotny, Save the Children’s country director in Haiti. "Being in school gives children a sense of normalcy and a feeling of security that is missing during disasters," he said, adding that Save the Children would be setting up child friendly spaces, with trained personnel, so children have a place to be safe while their parents start the recovery process.

Save the Children has worked in Haiti since 1978. To support our work in response to Hurricane Matthew, please visit: savethechildren.org/Matthew

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every Last Girl

Former child bride Aisha*, 15, with her two year-old daughter Rayan* in their family home in Somalia (*names changed to protect identity). Credit: Colin Crowley/Save the Children

Download the Report

Media Contact: Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, CT (Oct. 10, 2016) — One girl under 15 is married every seven seconds, according to new analysis by Save the Children that reveals the scale of the threat posed by child marriage to education, health and children’s safety.

Girls as young as 10 are marrying – to much older men - in countries like Afghanistan, Yemen, India and Somalia.

A new report released today by Save the Children, Every Last Girl: Free to live, free to learn, free from harm,has ranked countries in an index from the best to worst country in which to be a girl, based on child marriage, schooling, teen pregnancy, maternal deaths and number of female representatives in national government.

Countries at the bottom of the index include Niger, Chad, Central African Republic, Mali and Somalia, many of which have high rates of child marriage. Countries at the top include Sweden, Finland, Norway, Netherlands and Belgium.

“Child marriage starts a cycle of disadvantage that denies girls the opportunity to learn, develop and be children.” said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children.

“Girls who marry too early often can’t attend school, and are more likely to face domestic violence, abuse and rape. They get pregnant and bear children before they’re physically and emotionally ready, which can have devastating consequences on their and their baby’s health.”

The international community has pledged to end child marriage by 2030, but if current trends continue, the total number of women married in childhood will grow from more than 700 million today to around 950 million by 2030, and to 1.2 billion by 2050.

Every Last Girl

Former child bride Halima*, 17, still dreams about the baby daughter she is no longer able to visit, after leaving her abusive husband. (*name changed to protect identity). Credit:Colin Crowley/Save the Children

The report also reveals:

  • Girls affected by conflict are more likely to become child brides, with many refugee families marrying off their daughters as a safety or coping mechanism, such as Syrian girls in Lebanon;
  • Girls from poor families are more likely to be married early than their richer peers. In Nigeria, 40 percent of the poorest girls are married by 15, compared to 3 percent of the richest girls;
  • India has the highest number of child marriages of any country, partly owing to the large size of its population, with 47 percent of girls – around 24.6 million – married under 18;
  • Girls suffer most during humanitarian crises such as the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, where schools shutting down led to an estimated 14,000 teen pregnancies;

In Lebanon, Save the Children supports a 14-year-old Syrian girl named Sahar*, who was married at 13 to a 20-year-old man, and is now two months pregnant.

“The wedding day, I was imagining it would be a great day, but it wasn’t. It was all misery. It was full of sadness. Many girls who get married at a young age get illnesses and suffer from bleeding. Thank God it didn’t happen to me.,” said Sahar*.

“I feel really blessed that I am having a baby. But I am a child raising a child.”

Save the Children runs a range of programs that support the most disadvantaged girls around the world. It is calling on governments and donors to invest in girls’ education and life chances, to help bring an end to child marriage and gender discrimination.

Save the Children is releasing the report ahead of International Day of the Girl on Oct. 11,a day dedicated to highlighting the barriers girls face globally and to empowering girls to reach their full potential.

Notes to editors:

  • The full report can be accessed here: www.savethechildren.org/girls-report
  • *Sahar’s real name has been changed to protect her identity.
  • Child marriage rates: these are 2015 estimates produced by the UN for girls under 15 by asking women aged 20-24 if they were married before that age. The figures are therefore for young women who were married and under 15 before 2010. The ‘one girl married every seven seconds’ statistic is calculated by applying the 2015 global child marriage rate to global population figures, calculating the average number of marriages per year, and dividing the number of seconds in a year by the number of marriages per year. This differs from the statistic for girls under 18, which is one marriage every two seconds. Our index uses the statistic for child marriage under 18. We assume marriages are evenly distributed by age group.
  • Estimates of future trends: according to the United Nations Children’s Fund, the total number of women married in childhood will grow from more than 700 million today to around 950 million by 2030. By 2050 this number would reach 1.2 billion. See UNICEF (2014) Ending Child Marriage: Progress and Prospects
  • Lebanon: According to UNHCR data, more than 6 percent of Syrian girls aged between 12 and 17 in Lebanon are married.
  • India: As of 2006 (the latest year for which data on early marriage is available), 24.6 million females aged 20-24 were married before the age of 18 in India.

Save the Children invests in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. In the United States and around the world, we give children a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 10, 2016) — Save the Children unequivocally condemns Saturday’s attack on a community hall in Sana’a where mourners had gathered to pay their respects during a funeral ceremony. The attack resulted in the deaths of at least 140 people, including dozens of children, and injured hundreds more according to the Ministry of Public Health.

"This attack is inexcusable and yet another example of the scant regard for humanitarian laws all sides to the conflict continue to demonstrate when it comes to the protection of civilians, including the lives of innocent children," Edward Santiago, Save the Children’s Country Director in Yemen said.

"While the Human Rights Council took an encouraging first step last month by appointing additional international experts to Yemen, the council again failed to agree to the establishment of an independent commission of enquiry to investigate alleged violations of international human rights and humanitarian laws. Saturday’s attack is yet another example of why such a body is necessary in order to address the ongoing lack of accountability. Without it, all sides will continue to pursue their military objectives with impunity.

"Enough is therefore enough – it is high time the international community put aside political and economic interests and exerted sustained pressure on all the parties to the conflict to find a sustainable solution to the conflict and end this senseless loss of life."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Concerns over basic needs, cholera, gender-based violence, education

Hurricane Matthew
Children play on a tree felled by Hurricane Matthew. Two days after Hurricane Matthew hit Haiti, villages along the coastline are devastated by flooding and damage from falling trees. Save the Children is on the ground throughout affected areas in Haiti and has launched an emergency response to the disaster.

Hurricane Matthew Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 9, 2016) — As the full extent of the devastation in Haiti becomes known, children are not only unable to access basic necessities and medical care but are also facing a unique set of risks that make them particularly vulnerable, Save the Children is warning.

Save the Children's emergency response team was in the hard hit areas of Sud and Grand' Anse on Saturday and reported seeing numerous children lacking basic necessities and without adult supervision. Reports also indicate at least 2,000 children who have been separated from their parents or were living in orphanages have been evacuated.

"It is critical that we support families during this time," Kevin Novotny, Save the Children's Country Director in Haiti said. "Children are at risk of gender based violence and placement into orphanages or long term domestic servitude if their parents are unable to provide them with food and meet other basic needs. We cannot allow this to happen."

Save the Children's emergency response team is working with staff and partners to assess damage done to schools we support as well as provide food to some shelters and identify needs for non-food items. We have also deployed our emergency health unit, which will help with cholera prevention and basic health services.

"We are in a race against time to avert a mass cholera outbreak" Dr. Unni Krishnan, Director of the Emergency Health Unit said. "Recent emergencies such as Ebola and the cholera outbreak in Haiti in 2010 have highlighted the urgent need for clearer, more streamlined health responses. Our emergency health unit meets that need. It responded to yellow fever in DRC and will make an important contribution in Haiti."

Additionally, up to 130,000 vulnerable children nationwide are estimated to be out of school. Early estimates are that 50 percent of the 131 schools we support in Sud, Grand' Anse and Port au Prince have been damaged.

"It is imperative that children return to school as soon as possible," Novotny added. "Being in school gives children a sense of normalcy and a feeling of security that is missing during disasters. Where children cannot immediately return to school, we will be setting up child friendly spaces, so children have a place to be safe and engage in educational play while their parents start the recovery process."

Save the Children has worked in Haiti since 1978. To support our work in response to Hurricane Matthew, please visit: savethechildren.org/Matthew

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Save the Children Responding in Haiti and Preparing for Impact in the U.S.

Hurricane Matthew

Hurricane Matthew Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 6, 2016) — Up to 130,000 vulnerable children in Haiti are estimated to be out of school following the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Matthew, Save the Children is warning. A number of schools supported by the organization have been damaged, and many others are being used as temporary shelters.

Save the Children has worked in Haiti for over 40 years. It supports 131 schools, including 27 in the departments of Sud and Grand’Anse and 39 in Port-au Prince.

In addition to an emergency response team, the organization is also deploying its Emergency Health Unit, staffed by specialists from around the world. The unit, made of up doctors and health experts, will initially focus on cholera prevention and provision of basic health services.

Save the Children’s emergency teams, in coordination with the government other aid agencies, will work with staff and partners on the ground to assess the immediate needs and help children and families affected.

Part of the organization’s response will include setting up "child-friendly spaces" to provide children unable to go to school with a safe and protected space. Here they can receive support from trained staff and can play with other children, while their parents deal with the aftermath of the hurricane.

"Our first priority is to ensure that the thousands of children and families who have been badly affected are given the immediate assistance needed," Kevin Novotny, Save the Children’s Country Director in Haiti said. "This includes keeping children safe and getting them back into school as soon as possible."

The full extent of the damage is yet to be assessed, but up to five million people are estimated to be affected, with 300,000 thought to be in need of humanitarian assistance. Latest reports suggest more than 100 people in Haiti have been killed.

There is also concern that the existing cholera outbreak could spread rapidly, as water shortages have been exacerbated in certain areas. The destruction of crop plantations and reports of livestock being killed in Acquin district and Sud department will worsen existing food insecurity.

As the most powerful Caribbean hurricane in nearly a decade struck the southwest coast of Haiti on Tuesday, Save the Children staff on the ground reported major devastation with severe damage to houses and buildings as a result of landslides and floods following the storm. Roads were also blocked and crop plantations decimated. 1,300 temporary shelters that have been set up across the country as homes have been destroyed.

Hurricane Matthew is now taking aim at the eastern coast of Florida over the next 24-28 hours, bringing with it the possibility of 145 mph winds, a dangerous storm surge and flooding. Every school district along the Florida coast is closed and two million people have been urged to evacuate across Florida, Georgia and South Carolina.

Save the Children is prepositioning an emergency response team in Florida to be able to help families and children as soon as the storm passes. The team will assess needs and is preparing to set up child friendly spaces in shelters when it is safe to do so.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Hurricane Matthew Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 6, 2016) – After devastating Haiti, Hurricane Matthew is taking aim at the eastern coast of Florida over the next 24-28 hours, bringing with it the possibility of 145 mph winds, a dangerous storm surge and flooding. Every school district along the Florida coast is closed and two million people have been urged to evacuate across Florida, Georgia and South Carolina.

Save the Children is prepositioning an emergency response team in Florida to be able to help families and children as soon as the storm passes. The team will assess needs and is preparing to set up child friendly spaces in shelters when it is safe to do so. Child friendly spaces provide children with a safe place to be engaged in educational play with other children, while giving parents a much-needed opportunity to go out and assess the damage.

"We are carefully monitoring Hurricane Matthew as it moves up the coast so we can help children and families in need at the earliest possible moment," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "We have responded to every major hurricane since Hurricane Katrina and we will use the knowledge gained during those emergencies to help families in Florida."

"With the exact path and impact of the storm still not totally clear, we are prepositioning just outside the evacuation area so we are ready to respond," said Jeanne-Aimée de Marrais, Emergency Response Team leader said en route to Florida. "Save the Children supports early childhood education programming in the state and children and families will be the focus of our response efforts."

Save the Children continues to respond in Haiti. We are deploying our Emergency Health Unit, a team that will provide life-saving primary healthcare in response to water-born and other health needs caused by the hurricane. The government estimates that over one million people live in the hard-hit departments of Grand’ Anse and Sud, including more than 500,000 children.

To support Save the Children’s work in response to Hurricane Matthew, please visit: savethechildren.org/Matthew.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Iraqi Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 5, 2016) — A looming assault on the Iraqi city of Mosul threatens to put more than half a million children in the line of fire unless safe routes and other civilian protection measures are put in place, Save the Children warns.

The de facto capital of the Islamic State group in Iraq has a population of 1.2 to 1.5 million people.[i] At least half of them are children.

A final push to retake the city by Iraqi and coalition forces, after two years of occupation, is slated to begin later this month. Families that stay could be caught in the crossfire. Without safe escape routes from the city, those who attempt to flee may face snipers, landmines, and capture or execution by IS fighters.

A mother who recently fled the city told Save the Children that she and her three children, including a four-month-old baby, dodged bullets as they ran across the front line. Two young brothers said they ran barefoot through the outskirts of the city, leaving behind their mother who was too heavily pregnant to run but begged the boys to go.

"Families have an impossible decision to make," said Maurizio Crivallero, Save the Children’s Country Director in Iraq. "If they stay, their children may get caught in the crossfire and suffer from no food or medicine. If they decide to flee, they will have to run a gauntlet of fighters, snipers and landmines.

"If you just count the children who are in grave danger right now, they alone would more than fill a city the size of Atlanta. All sides must make sure there are safe routes for them to escape the fighting. The priority must be to ensure families are safe while they are fleeing, and properly protected if they make it out alive."

The United Nations and aid agencies are preparing for a sudden exodus of up to a million people from the city,[ii] the most challenging humanitarian response in years. But there is a shortage of life-saving aid – with the UN’s emergency appeal just 48 percent funded. [iii]

Save the Children’s rapid-response units are on standby in Iraq and the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, and are ready to deploy with safe drinking water, emergency food, basic household items, and specialist child protection support. We plan to provide psychological first aid for vulnerable children, and identify those separated from their families or fleeing alone.

Over the following days and weeks we aim to provide mobile education and mental health support, help reunite children with their families, and truck in water and supplies. Over six months we are planning to reach 200,000 people.

Crivallero said: "Mosul is a city of children and the international community must do more to make sure they are safe. If we ignore the tragedy that is unfolding in Iraq, hundreds of thousands of children will pay the price."

[i] http://reliefweb.int/report/iraq/iraq-mosul-flash-appeal-enkuar

[ii] http://www.unocha.org/top-stories/all-stories/iraq-54-cent-planned-programmes-have-either-shut-down-or-could-not-begin-all

[iii] https://fts.unocha.org/pageloader.aspx?page=emerg-emergencyDetails&appealID=2880

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Marvel Studios to Donate up to $1 Million in Recognition of New Charitable Initiative

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Oct. 5, 2016) — In a special video message, actor Benedict Cumberbatch, star of Marvel Studios’ upcoming film "Doctor Strange," has announced the launch of Marvel Studios: Hero Acts, a brand-new charitable initiative focused on bringing help and hope to kids around the world.

Marvel Studios is launching the first Hero Acts campaign today, and from now until the end of the year, Marvel Studios will donate five dollars ($5) to Save the Children, up to U.S. one million dollars, for every fan who uploads a photo of themselves in their favorite Marvel hero pose. Marvel Studios is collaborating with Fotition, a new social change platform, to power the experience on a brand-new website MarvelStudiosHeroActs.com. Fans will be able to visit the site to upload their photo and choose from a selection of custom Marvel-themed overlays. They will then be able to post their photo directly to the Hero Acts gallery and to their other social channels using the hashtags #marvelstudios #heroacts.

"After the experience of filming portions of ‘Doctor Strange’ in Nepal, our team was inspired to give back to the kids there and wanted to establish a larger ongoing program in support of children facing extraordinary circumstances," said Kevin Feige, Producer & President, Marvel Studios. "For our first Marvel Studios: Hero Acts effort, we’re thrilled to team up with Save the Children, an organization with decades of experience improving the lives of children around the world."

With fan participation, the donations made through Hero Acts can help Save the Children provide much-needed learning materials for as many as 123,000 kids in Nepal, Haiti, and the United States. Together, Marvel Studios and its fans can help put these children on a path where they can learn, thrive, and strive toward a better future.

"Save the Children is extremely grateful to be the first nonprofit organization to be part of Marvel Studios: Hero Acts," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "Even though more children are enrolled in primary school worldwide than ever before, many are struggling to learn and to get a quality education. That is why this collaboration is so valuable. The funds raised through Hero Acts will provide much-needed learning materials in communities where there are few resources, and will boost children’s basic skills to help them succeed in school and in life. The actions taken by Marvel fans will make a meaningful difference for children."

Whether visiting children in hospitals, granting wishes to children with life-threatening illnesses, or inspiring kids and families through our content, Marvel Studios: Hero Acts builds on the tradition of lending a hand to children in times of need. From our filmmakers to our fans, we believe we each have our own superpower to lend to the world, and Marvel Studios is dedicated to bringing that out in everyone.

To learn more, visit MarvelStudiosHeroActs.com.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



The Collaboration Supporting International Day of the Girl Will Be Available Starting Today for Two Weeks, with 100 Percent of the Net Proceeds Going to Save the Children

Love Only T-shirt
Camila wears her limited edition Love Only T-Shirt which supports Save the Children.
Photo: Save the Children

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Oct. 4, 2016) — Fifth Harmony’s Camila Cabello has teamed up with Save the Children to design a limited-edition T-shirt to shine a light on girls around the world. The special Love Only collaboration, which launches ahead of International Day of the Girl, is available starting today through Oct. 18, with 100 percent of the net proceeds going to Save the Children. The Love Only collaboration will be available at represent.com/camila.

On Oct. 11, Save the Children will celebrate International Day of the Girl, a day dedicated to highlighting the barriers girls face globally and to empowering girls to reach their full potential. The Love Only tee will help support the charity’s efforts to raise awareness of these issues and to ensure a world where girls get equal access to education, health care and opportunities to succeed. The Love Only collaboration for Save the Children is Camila Cabello’s first-ever charity tee.

"Love Only is an important concept to me -- it’s all about uplifting ourselves and supporting others," Camila Cabello, a Save the Children Celebrity Cabinet member, said. "I am so inspired by what Save the Children is doing to give girls around the world a brighter future. So I wanted to support this amazing cause by designing this special Love Only tee and hoodie."

The limited-edition T-shirt is selling for $24.99. A hoodie sweatshirt is also offered for $39.99. Both styles are available for purchase worldwide.

Camila Cabello and Save the Children invite supporters and influencers to get involved, take a photo in the T-shirt and spread the campaign on social media using #LoveOnlyTee.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 4, 2016) – Hurricane Matthew, a Category 4 storm, slammed the southern coast of Haiti on Tuesday morning with winds of 145 mph, flooding and extensive damage.

Save the Children is deploying an emergency response team to work with staff and partners on the ground to help the children and families affected by the storm. The organization pre-positioned a stockpile of non-food items, including hygiene kits, baby items, household kits, mosquito nets and jerry cans, which will be used in coming days. Additional necessities will be supplied after the response team conducts an initial evaluation.

"Our thoughts and hearts go out to the Haitian people, many of whom had yet to fully recover from the earthquake that devastated the country in 2010," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "We have worked in Haiti for more than 30 years and will coordinate closely with the Haitian government to help those most affected by the disaster."

Save the Children supports 131 schools in Haiti, including 27 in the area of south Grand'Anse and 39 in Port-au Prince. The organization also provides technical assistance in water, sanitation and hygiene and newborn health to the Ministry of Health.

"Children are often most vulnerable during disasters such as this," Miles said. "Our emergency response team will be carefully evaluating how we can best help children, including getting them back into school as soon as possible."

Part of Save the Children's emergency response will likely include setting up "child-friendly spaces" at evacuation centers, which will provide children with a safe place to be engaged in educational play with other children, while giving parents a much-needed opportunity to go out and assess the damage.

To support Save the Children's emergency response in Haiti, visit: www.savethechildren.org/Matthew.

Spokespeople are available for comment. Contact Erin Taylor at 267.250.8829 to arrange an interview.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Vos Hestia

Child Refugee Crisis Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 3, 2016) — At least 600 children have died trying to cross the Mediterranean so far this year, Save the Children has found. The toll, from a new analysis of data by the international aid organization, means on average, two children per day died or disappeared between January 1 and September 26.

More than 3,500 people have drowned in the Mediterranean this year — nearly 600 more people compared to the same period last year.

The figures have been released to coincide with the third anniversary of a shipwreck off the coast of Lampedusa, Italy, in which more than 300 people were killed.

"Today, we remember the 368 refugees and migrants who tragically lost their lives off the coast of Lampedusa on October 3, 2013, trying to reach the safety of Europe's shores," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "Three years ago, leaders promised 'never again' as images of the shipwreck and coffins were brought to international attention. But since then, more than 10,400 men, women and children have died or gone missing trying to reach Europe by sea.

"The Mediterranean sea has become an unmarked grave for children fleeing war, persecution and extreme poverty. The international community cannot continue to ignore these tragedies - we have an obligation to protect children, both in Europe and during their treacherous journeys."

Save the Children has worked at Italian ports for more than eight years, helping keep unaccompanied children safe when they arrive on land and has recently extended its operations to help save lives at sea. The organization’s search and rescue vessel, Vos Hestia, has already saved more than 600 people in less than one month, including 85 children - some younger than five years old. More than 200 refugees and migrants were rescued during two search and rescue operations in the Mediterranean on Sunday.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.




Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (October 3, 2016) — As world leaders prepare to review their engagement in Afghanistan, at a conference in Brussels this week, Save the Children is calling for urgent investment in the health, education and protection of Afghan children in order to prevent the reversal of once promising development progress.

The organization is particularly concerned by recent reports that European aid to Afghanistan could be made conditional upon the return of Afghan asylum seekers from Europe.

"Aid should be driven solely by the needs of Afghan children and their parents, not made conditional on the return of thousands of Afghan asylum seekers, especially in light of increased levels of violence and conflict across the country," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children.

Despite strong improvements in health and education over the last decade, the situation remains dire for children in Afghanistan, where two out of five children under 5 are malnourished and four out of five girls don’t finish primary school.

Making matters worse, fighting has intensified across much of the country over the past two years. Last year saw the highest number of civilian casualties in Afghanistan in a 12-month period since UN reporting began in 2009.

"We’re worried that without urgent and sustained support from the international community including strong commitments in health, education and protection, much of the hard-won progress could start to erode," Miles added.

"Displacement is increasing in Afghanistan as violence spreads across the country, meaning more children and families are fleeing their homes in search of safety. They are particularly vulnerable to harm and need the support of the international community," said Ana Locsin, Save the Children Country Director in Afghanistan.

"The unfortunate truth is that Afghanistan is simply not equipped to deal with such a huge numbers of displaced people on its own."

Meanwhile hundreds of thousands of Afghans in Pakistan are being forced to return home to escape what the International Organization for Migration called "increased incidents of violence, arbitrary arrest, detention and other forms of harassment" in Pakistan.

"The sudden return of potentially more than 1 million Afghans who originally fled fighting in Afghanistan in the 1980s will place a huge burden on the communities they return to. It’s really important that returnee children have the same rights as other children in Afghanistan," Locsin said.

"At the same time, the number of Afghan children heading to Europe has also dramatically increased compared to a few years ago. The fact children are leaving Afghanistan in such large numbers, putting themselves at huge risk and often alone, just shows the level of desperation they feel."

More than half of all unaccompanied children seeking asylum in Europe in 2015 were from Afghanistan.

"There is a multitude of reasons children give for leaving Afghanistan, including a lack of access to education, conflict, violence and poverty. Then they face a whole new set of dangers en route to European countries," Locsin added.

"Ultimately, however, addressing the needs of Afghan children is the most sustainable way to tackle the root cause of this phenomenon and that starts with aid investment. As long as those needs aren’t being met, European countries should not force children to return to a place where they may face threats and stigma for failing their family or betraying their country."

Save the Children’s call comes as world leaders prepare to meet at the Brussels Conference on Afghanistan on October 5, which will comprise up to 70 countries and 30 international organizations and agencies. A High Level Dialogue on Migration will also take place, which will likely focus on returns of asylum-seekers.

Save the Children is urging the European Union and other international donors to work constructively during the conference, including making commitments to increase aid to Afghanistan and urgently respond to the growing humanitarian needs of internally displaced Afghans and returnees.

The aid agency is also calling on the Afghan government make the rights and protection of all Afghan children a political priority.

"The international community and the Afghan government simultaneously need to step up to support these incredibly vulnerable children and families," Locsin said.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (September 30, 2016) — Children in Aleppo are in so much danger from bunker-busting ‘earthquake bombs’ that they cannot even go to schools that have been moved underground.

Schools in Eastern Aleppo were due to re-open for the new school year tomorrow [Saturday], but as the city continues to suffer a ferocious assault they will remain closed, depriving almost 100,000[1] school-age children of an education, while they continue to fear for their lives.

Save the Children supports 13 schools in the city, eight of which are underground – they moved into basements over the last two years to try to protect children from shelling, air strikes, barrel bombs and artillery fire which regularly hit civilian areas. Now, with the use of so-called "bunker busting bombs" over the last week, which burrow 12 to 15 feet underground then explode, even the basements schools aren’t safe.

Omar,* a school principal in eastern Aleppo, said, "Parents are afraid to send their children to school because everything is targeted. The students are also suffering on all levels, you see them barely walking, dragging themselves, which makes them unable to focus on the learning and studying."

"Regarding the bunker-busting bombs, of course only hearing the sound creates a state of terror and panic that is not like anything else. The immense power of destruction is the most important, it can destroy underground shelters and basements and the buildings get totally destroyed, not just partially."

These weapons, also known as ‘earthquake bombs’ are designed to destroy military installations, with a delayed fuse which creates a huge explosion underground and leaves a crater. They have a devastating impact on civilian areas, killing and maiming people who thought they would be safer in a basement, and their use in Aleppo constitutes a potential war crime.

More than 300 children have been killed or injured in Eastern Aleppo in the past five days. Given the danger posed to children even in their own homes, it’s not safe for schools to reopen. Schools are also lacking the basic necessities such as fuel to light and heat the basements, water supplies, textbooks and pencils.

12-year-old Amjad* said, "We are not going to school because the airplanes bomb any gathering. When the plane comes we sit on the floor, afraid that things might fall above us. One of my friends died in the bombing – he was my best friend. I love to go to school to study and I wish I could become a civil engineer to rebuild the houses that were destroyed."

Even before this latest escalation, education had been decimated in the city. The official enrollment figures have fallen as low as 6 percent, although thousands of children attend our schools every week. Through displacement, conflict and poverty, many children have dropped out or can only attend sporadically, and parents have been afraid to send their children to school for fear they will be targeted. In just the last three months, seven staff and five students have been killed just in the schools we support in Eastern Aleppo.

Nick Finney, Save the Children’s Northwest Syria Country Director, said: "We’re now more likely to see children being pulled from the rubble or treated on the floor of a hospital than sat at a school desk. Children deserve the right to play, to learn, to be children. The use of bunker busting bombs means there is literally nowhere we can keep children safe, and we want to see the use of these weapons investigated as a potential war crime.

"As families struggle for survival, the start of the new school year will come and go. Syria’s children have paid a heavy price for a conflict that is not of their making. This appalling escalation in violence will eventually end, but for those who survive, it will be very difficult to get back the years of schooling children have missed and rebuild their lives."

Save the Children runs catch-up classes through the summer and has distributed ‘study-at-home kits’ so when schools are closed because of the violence, children can still attempt to keep up their education. We have 54 education kits prepositioned to enter the city for schools, along with thousands of food baskets, but the siege and intense violence means the aid can’t reach Aleppo’s children.

We urgently need a ceasefire agreement that will end the indiscriminate attacks on civilians and allow us to bring aid in and reopen the schools. All parties to the conflict should cease the use of heavy explosive weapons in populated areas due to the predictable pattern of harm caused to the civilian population and the inevitable deaths of more children. Save the Children is also calling for an impartial international investigation into the deadly attack on a UN/SARC aid convoy last week and into violations of International Humanitarian Law in the current escalation in Aleppo.

The continued use of heavy explosive weapons in populated areas throughout the conflict has caused death, destruction, injury, and psychological trauma to children and families across Syria. Attacks on schools have also become all too common. Armed forces and armed groups inside Syria should immediately cease the attacks against education facilities, teachers, and students and stop occupying schools for military purposes.

[1]The Syria Education Cluster estimates there are 94,260 children aged 5-17 in East Aleppo.
*Names changed for protection.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Kids Show Encourages 'Early Love of Reading'

MackandMoxy
Photo Credit: Mack & Moxy

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Sept. 29, 2016) – Starting Oct. 1, families will be able to stream on Netflix the new children’s program "Mack & Moxy," including an episode on the importance of reading and early literacy created in partnership with Save the Children, which has a special guest appearance by actor Josh Duhamel.

"We know how important talking, singing and reading to children from their earliest days can be to a child’s future success in school and life," said Bill Corwin, vice president of Save the Children’s U.S. Programs. "The wonderful thing about this special episode of "Mack & Moxy" is that it helps children and families see that they have the power to unlock the full potential of young children in their own families and beyond."

Save the Children partners with families, schools and communities to give children a healthy start, protection from harm and the best possible opportunity to learn. In the United States, Save the Children offers a continuum of early literacy programming in some of the nation’s most marginalized communities. The organization supports mothers during pregnancy, provides home visits to families of infants and toddlers, helps young children get ready for school, runs literacy programs in elementary schools and empowers local leaders to make early literacy a priority. By reaching vulnerable children early and helping them get on track to be kindergarten-ready and to read well by third grade, Save the Children prepares children to succeed in the rest of their school years and beyond.

Series creator Brahm Wenger states, "When we came up with the idea for "Mack & Moxy," we wanted the series to be a celebration of the satisfaction that comes from helping others. We knew it would be important to team up with well-respected charities in order give the series credibility and draw upon their expertise. So, of course, Save the Children was at the top of our list. With their invaluable input, we were able to put together a wonderful episode that encourages children to develop an early love of reading."

Combining state-of-the-art 3D animation, live-action puppets, fun adventures, humor and music, each "Mack & Moxy" episode is geared toward kids ages 3 to 7 and inspired by the kindness of the great humanitarians who make this world a better place.

In the episode developed with Save the Children, called "A Friend Who Reads is a Friend Indeed," the show’s heroes Mack & Moxy set out on a colorful adventure to HelpeeLand. They meet Nolie, a loveable little puffball who has never had any pals to play with. As "Mack & Moxy" become her first friends, they share and sing about the joys of reading books. The episode features guest star Josh Duhamel ("Transformers") as the "Admirable," who provides age-appropriate context about the importance of the message, and Hank Azaria ("The Simpsons") as the voice of Shelfish Sheldon.

"Mack & Moxy" is produced by Socially Dynamic Entertainment in association with Vancouver, Canada-based animation studio Bardel Entertainment ("Jake and the Neverland Pirates"; "Puss in Boots"; "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles").

Learn more about "Mack & Moxy" at MackandMoxy.com

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Children Going Untreated in Yemen Hospitals Unless Parents Supply Own Medicine

Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (September 27, 2016) — Desperate parents are being asked to provide their own medicines to treat their malnourished children, as Yemen’s hospitals run out of supplies and the health system has collapsed.

Yemeni families told Save the Children staff they are so poor they can barely afford fuel and transport costs to get to hospitals. Even when families are able to borrow cash to get to the hospital, they cannot afford essential medicines once they get there.

Dr. Abdullah Thabit who runs the Malnutrition Section of Al Sabeen mother and child hospital in the capital Sana’a said: "On Saturday two twins died because of a lack of medicine. The situation here is very critical, we see more than three cases of malnourished children every day from different cities.

"There are not enough rooms or doctors, and no medicine. The hospital cannot provide salaries to bring more doctors. The salary is not enough because the cost of currency is going up and food is expensive. Meanwhile, we ask the patients to buy medicine themselves from outside the hospital. Some cannot afford the medicine so they leave and they don’t come back and we don’t know what will happen next, especially to their children."

The hospital’s manager Dr. Hilal AlBahri said: "Children are dying and we are out of medicine. The health system has already collapsed."

Two-year-old Amal was suffering from Kwashikor - a severe form of malnutrition caused by a lack of protein and nutrients that traps fluid in body tissues. Her mother said: "Twenty days ago she got acute diarrhoea, we went immediately to the closest health centre in our village. But doctors asked us to go to the capital city Sana’a because they don’t have medicine. When we arrived in Sana’a, we came to this hospital and they said she needs medicine. I was forced to sell my jewellery to afford it." Other parents have sold their possessions and taken out loans.

Yemeni families told Save the Children staff they have lost their jobs and livelihoods as a result of the war so cannot afford food and medicine. Many are eating just one meal a day.

Edward Santiago, Save the Children’s Country Director in Yemen, said: "The horrifying images of starving-to-death children coming out of Yemen are reminiscent of what we saw in Ethiopia 30 years ago. The images galvanized global action back then, yet when it comes to Yemen’s children today, the world seems to be looking the other way."

Alongside malnutrition and related illness, many children have died as a direct impact of the conflict and there have been multiple allegations of grave violations of children’s rights by all fighting forces. At least 1,188 children have been killed and more than 1,796 wounded by airstrikes and ground fighting since the start of the conflict. Dozens of schools and hospitals have been attacked, and the military recruitment and use of children, including in front-line roles, is widespread. So far no one has been held to account for these actions.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

206.275.2048 (M)

 

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (September 26, 2016) — Today, Students Rebuild, a program of the Bezos Family Foundation that mobilizes young people to take action on some of the world’s most critical problems, announced a new partnership with Save the Children and Global Nomads Group to launch the Youth Uplift Challenge. By providing young people with access to new educational opportunities, the Challenge is designed to create pathways for youth around the globe to take collective action to uplift their peers.

Over 400 million children worldwide live in extreme poverty—on less than $1.90 each day—and struggle to provide for themselves and their families. These circumstances often push students to leave their education behind and make it difficult for them to succeed later in life.

"As a global community, we all have a stake in helping ensure our young people receive the support necessary to realize the dreams they have for themselves and each other," said Jackie Bezos, President of the Bezos Family Foundation. "By harnessing the power of many, Students Rebuild offers youth the opportunity to learn deeply and take meaningful action on issues that often feel too big to affect alone."

The Youth Uplift Challenge will support Save the Children in providing flexible job training and entrepreneurship programs, access to peer networks and mentors, and new education and work experiences for young people.

"Employers today increasingly require that young people not only have strong technical skills, but also have the skills that enable them to solve problems, communicate well and work collaboratively," said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. "Through support from the Youth Uplift Challenge, Save the Children will implement programs that close the skills gap for deprived and at-risk youth and give them tools they need to realize their potential and lift themselves, their families and their communities out of poverty."

Participation in the Youth Uplift Challenge is simple and meaningful: Learn about the issue of poverty and its impact on the lives of young people across the globe. Think about your skills and talents and how you might lend a hand to uplift others globally and locally. Reflect on that learning by making a symbolic hand. For every hand sent in, the Bezos Family Foundation will donate $1.90—up to $500,000—to Save the Children’s programs in Nicaragua and Indonesia that empower youth and provide new pathways of possibility.

Additional information about the Uplift Youth Challenge can be found here.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact: Caroline Anning +90 5311038201

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Sept. 25, 2016) Humanitarian partners in Eastern Aleppo have told Save the Children that approximately half of the casualties they are pulling from the rubble or treating in hospitals are children.

One hospital said that 43 percent of the injured they treated yesterday were children, and the ambulance crew with Shafak, a Syrian NGO, said more than 50 percent of the casualties they have picked up in the last 48 hours are children.

Doctors are working round the clock to try to save them, but children are dying on the floors of hospitals due to critical shortages of basic medicines and equipment, including ventilators, anaesthetics and antibiotics. Severe cases need to be transferred out of Eastern Aleppo for treatment, but all roads are blocked.

The information they have provided paints a picture of unimaginable violence and suffering for children and their families, as the UN Security Council meets for an emergency session on Aleppo.

Dr. Abu Rajab, who works at a hospital in the besieged enclave, said that of 67 injured patients that came in yesterday, 29 were children. Five children died because the hospital did not have enough ventilators to treat them. This morning (information received at 7 a.m. EDT), 17 more patients had come in.

Dr. Abu Rajab said (click for full interview): “The field hospitals where we work are completely full with injured people and casualties, the majority of them women and children. The patients are on the floor, with no ventilators for the ones who need oxygen. We have to take the ventilators from one patient to save another. We have severe shortages [of medicines and equipment] and exhausted medical staff who are working above human ability, 24 hours a day.”

“Through you, we are calling for immediate help, calling all humans around the world. We demand, through the Security Council’s platform, to stop the airstrikes on Aleppo city – the airstrikes which are causing all of this.”

Aid agencies estimated there were at least 100,000 children trapped in eastern Aleppo when the siege was first imposed in June.

Sonia Khush, Save the Children’s Syria Director, said: “We are witnessing an appalling atrocity being perpetuated against the children of Aleppo in front of our eyes today. The failure to protect them and children across Syria will haunt the international community for decades to come.

“The UN Security Council has a chance to right the wrong and prevent more suffering when it meets today in New York. They cannot leave the room until they agree an immediate ceasefire, with roads opened to allow us to bring desperately needed food, clean water and medical supplies in.

“There must also be accountability and justice for what has happened. We support calls for an independent investigation into the attack on the UN/SARC aid convoy last week. That investigation should also have the remit to look at whether there have been other breaches of International Humanitarian Law and war crimes committed in this latest escalation.”

Click here for full transcripts and audio clips of Dr Abu Rajab’s interviews from hospital today.

For interviews and further information, please contact c.anning@savethechildren.org.uk or call +90 5311038201 (Caroline, Antakya) / +44 7831650409 (Simon, London).

About Save the Children

Save the Children believes every child deserves a future. In 120 countries around the world, we work every day to give children a healthy start in life, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. When crisis strikes, and children are most vulnerable, we are always among the first to respond and the last to leave. We ensure children’s unique needs are met and their voices are heard. We deliver lasting results for millions of children, including those hardest to reach.

We do whatever it takes for children – every day and in times of crisis – transforming their lives and the future we share. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. 

 



Event will Support Save the Children’s Efforts to End Preventable Child Deaths and Promote Early Childhood Education

Media Contacts
Jordyn Linsk 475.999.3116

Fairfield, Conn. (September 20, 2016) – Save the Children, the leading organization investing in childhood, today announced that the 4th Annual Save the Children Illumination Gala will honor supermodel and activist Iman; gamer, philanthropist and activist Bachir Boumaaza aka "Athene;" writer and Red Nose Day co-founder Richard Curtis; and the organization’s philanthropic corporate partner Toys"R"Us. The event will be hosted by Save the Children Artist Ambassador and Trustee Jennifer Garner, and will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016, at The Plaza hotel in New York City.

Now in its fourth year, the Illumination Gala will benefit Save the Children’s efforts to give more children a stronger start in life by helping end preventable maternal, newborn and child deaths and by supporting early childhood education. In recognition of the occasion, Save the Children will celebrate each of the honorees for their achievements in giving children a brighter future:

• The Voice Award for Iman, Supermodel, Activist and Founder of IMAN Cosmetics, who is being recognized for her enduring commitment to sharing the stories of the world’s most deprived children. While serving as our Artist Ambassador, Iman was tireless in her efforts to raise awareness for the 2011 food crisis in East Africa. By participating in our Fast-athon, using her jewelry line to raise emergency funds and calling on the international community to take action, Iman has given a voice to children who would otherwise go unheard.

• The Next Generation Award for Bachir Boumaaza aka "Athene," Gamer, Philanthropist and Activist, who is being recognized for inspiring young gamers to make a positive impact on the world. Athene has visited our programs in Southeast Asia and Africa to livestream from the field while generating media coverage, brand awareness and millions of dollars to support our programs. His GamingforGood volunteer team, platform and network have connected thousands of gamers and streamers to our work, and transformed our approach to reaching the next generation of donors and fundraisers.

• The Advocate Award for Richard Curtis, Writer, Campaigner, and Red Nose Day Co-Founder, who is being recognized for pioneering the use of entertainment to drive positive change. As co-founder of Comic Relief, Curtis has devoted the last 30 years to achieving the vision of a just world, free from poverty. Through Red Nose Day and Sport Relief, he has helped direct billions of dollars and priceless public attention toward tackling the root causes of poverty and injustice – demonstrating his ability to make people laugh while also empowering them to take action.

• The Visionary Award for Toys"R"Us, being accepted David Brandon, Chairman and CEO. The company is being recognized for its commitment to keeping kids safe and helping them in times of need in the United States and around the world. Through the Play with Purpose campaign, Toys"R"Us leveraged its brand to spotlight early learning through play as a critical component of childhood development. Since 2005, Toys"R"Us has contributed more than $9 million to Save the Children's emergency response and early childhood education programs, demonstrating the company’s commitment to children every day and in times of crisis.

"We are thrilled to recognize such a diverse group of honorees who have done outstanding work with and on behalf of children around the world. We look forward to highlighting their important work and to celebrating their achievements. They have all committed their time and lent their voices to giving children a brighter future," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children president & CEO.

Other notable guests expected to attend include Lisa Plepler, Chairman of ArtsConnection, Richard Plepler, CEO of HBO, who will serve as honorary chairs of the 4th Annual Save the Children Illumination Gala, as well as fashion designer and philanthropist Gabriela Hearst, and Mary Dillon, Save the Children Trustee and CEO of ULTA Beauty, who will serve as co-chairs of the event. Michiel Huisman, actor and Save the Children Celebrity Cabinet member, is also scheduled to attend.

The gala will be presented by Johnson & Johnson. For more information, please visit www.savethechildren.org/gala.


Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (September 20, 2016) — In response to the attack on the aid convoy near Aleppo, Syria, Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children US, issued the following statement today:

"Today is a very dark day for agencies working on the relief effort in Syria. There can be no excuse for repeatedly bombing a UN and SARC aid convoy and warehouses, killing and injuring Syrian humanitarians who are trying to help people in the midst of a brutal conflict.

"The consequences of last night’s attack are far-reaching. Aid convoys have been suspended across the country, leaving hundreds of thousands of children without food, medicine and clean water. There are parts of the country, particularly around Damascus, where families are living under siege and are entirely dependent on UN aid that will now not arrive unless urgent action is taken.

"In Aleppo, doctors and ambulance workers have told Save the Children this morning that the bombing has been relentless and they were overwhelmed with casualties through the night. After a brief respite during the cessation of hostilities, humanitarian staff reported air strikes, barrel bombs and heavy artillery fire in civilian areas. An aid worker in East Aleppo said the hospitals are full, ambulances have broken down and children are getting sick from the lack of food.

"There are thousands of human tragedies behind the statistics in Syria. A teacher we work with in Madaya told us yesterday she has meningitis, part of a deadly outbreak in the town. She had pinned her hopes on an aid delivery due to arrive today, the first one since April, with food and medicine. That convoy has now been indefinitely delayed, leaving children in Madaya hungry, sick and trapped. It’s a story that is being repeated across Syria.

"Today in New York, President Obama and UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon are hosting a summit to bring together world leaders to take action to address the global refugee crisis. A vital part of this is ending the bloodshed and suffering inside Syria once and for all, and after so many broken promises this is a prime opportunity to take action. Despite the huge challenges, we cannot give up on trying to secure peace for Syria’s children.

"The first step must be to get the ceasefire reinstated, with a focus this time on getting access for humanitarian relief to all areas. Going forward, we need to see an end to the culture of impunity that allows hospitals, schools and aid convoys to be bombed. Too many brave Syrians have lost their lives trying to help others. Save the Children supports the UN’s call for an investigation into last night’s attack — attacks on humanitarians and civilian infrastructure have characterised this conflict to devastating effect.

"Today’s Leaders’ Summit must act to help those children and families who have managed to flee such desperate suffering and address the global refugee crisis. Save the Children is calling for world leaders to make political and financial commitments to ensure that no refugee child is out of school for more than one month, and to guarantee that all children forced to flee their homes have access to education, protection, healthcare, nutrition and shelter throughout their journey. Wealthy countries need to do much more to increase resettlement of refugees and ensure safe pathways to refuge."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

NEW YORK, NY (September 20, 2016) —Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children issued the following statement on the results achieved at the Leaders’ Summit on Refugees, convened by President Obama today in New York:

Collectively, world leaders made important policy and funding commitments this year to get 1 million more refugee children in school, 1 million more refugees access to legal work, provide a 4.5 billion dollar increase in humanitarian assistance, double refugee admissions.

These commitments are a much needed step in the right direction to help children and families who have been driven from their homes, but significant gaps remain. As President Obama himself acknowledged, governments must build on the momentum achieved at this summit to finish the job of meeting the needs of all 21.3 million refugees who have been forced to flee in search of safety.

As the world faces the largest refugee crisis since World War II, an astonishing 3.7 million refugee children around the globe are currently out of school. Without an education, these children face a bleak future. That is why Save the Children has been calling for no refugee child to be out of school for more than one month.

Today’s summit and yesterday’s UN High-Level Meeting on Refugees and Migrants were key opportunities for states to ensure displaced children have access to education with all of the safeguards a school environment provides. We were pleased to see the U.S. government announce nearly $37 million in funding for UNHCR to support refugee education programs in 16 countries, as well as to hear commitments from other countries to make changes that will allow more refugee children to access education. In the months ahead, Save the Children calls on all states to take additional action as a matter of urgency to make sure all 3.7 million out of school refugee children have access to education.

In order for these two meetings to have a meaningful and lasting impact, pledges made by states must translate into concrete actions on the ground. Save the Children calls on world leaders to host another summit next year to ensure the vision of the Leaders’ Summit is realized. Such a meeting is critical for governments to evaluate progress on their commitments and redouble their efforts to address the global refugee crisis. At a time when a record number of families are displaced, world leaders must act urgently to share the responsibility of protecting displaced populations and meeting their needs. It falls on all governments to come together and deliver a new deal for children – one that will ensure their right to a safe and productive life.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



International Day of the Girl is Observed Worldwide Annually on Oct. 11

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (September 14, 2016) — Save the Children announced today that actress and Artist Ambassador Dakota Fanning will light the world-famous Empire State Building red on Tuesday, Oct. 11 in a special ceremony celebrating International Day of the Girl. Marked globally by the United Nations, International Day of the Girl is a designated day for communities and policymakers to discuss how to end discrimination against girls and create opportunities for girls to reach their full potential. Worldwide, girls are frequently marginalized in their families, communities and societies. By lighting the Empire State Building red, Save the Children aims to raise awareness of these issues and illuminate the need to educate and empower girls around the world.

Fanning will be joined by Carolyn Miles, Save the Children’s president & CEO, a group of girls from the New York tri-state area, who are Save the Children child sponsors, and a sponsored girl from South Carolina. On Oct. 11, the Empire State Building will light up beginning at sunset to recognize girls and the unique challenges they face globally.

"I am so honored to join these young girls and Save the Children in celebrating International Day of the Girl," said Fanning, known for roles in notable films such as "I Am Sam," "The Runaways," "The Twilight Saga" and the upcoming "American Pastoral." "As a child sponsor and Artist Ambassador, I am a passionate advocate for the world’s most vulnerable children, and girls in particular are at risk of being left behind. New York holds a special place in my heart, and there’s really no better way to honor girls and bring attention to the obstacles they face worldwide than by lighting up one of the world’s most iconic landmarks."

Too often, girls are barred from the opportunity to learn, forced into marriage or even trafficked — limiting their lives and risking their futures. Save the Children believes it is possible to build a world in which every girl survives, thrives and realizes her dreams.

"Save the Children is committed to making a difference for every last girl," said Carolyn Miles, president & CEO of Save the Children. "Throughout the world, girls face higher rates of violence, poverty and discrimination. On the ladder of opportunity, girls are often left behind on the bottom rung. That’s why today — and every day — Save the Children is shining a light on girls. We are thrilled to celebrate International Day of the Girl with the help of Dakota Fanning, some of our powerful girl supporters and the Empire State Building. Together, we’ll do whatever it takes to empower the world’s girls so they can grow up healthy, educated and safe."

Save the Children believes that reaching girls is a critical component of ending early marriage, preventable maternal and child deaths and ensuring our collective future. The Save the Children sponsorship program, in particular, helps provide girls and boys with the necessities for a healthy and successful start to their life — nutrition, early childhood and adolescent development, education and school health. To join Fanning as a child sponsor and learn more, please visit https://sponsor.savethechildren.org/.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



New Analysis of Forcibly Displaced Finds World’s Fastest-growing Population also Among the Youngest, and Nearly Last in School Attendance

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (September 14, 2016) — The world’s 65.3 million forcibly displaced people—who would make up the world’s 21st largest country based on population—are falling far behind others in terms of education, health, child marriage, and other key factors, a new report by Save the Children illustrates.

"Forced to Flee: Inside the 21st Largest Country" examined indicators most relevant to the well-being of children and found results that demonstrate both the enormous challenges faced by refugees and Internally Displaced People as well as the notable contributions they could make to their host countries and communities if they were allowed to do so.

"Imagining all displaced people as citizens of one country recognizes their value as equal members of a global society and draws attention to the massive scale of the issues they face," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "The number of families forced to flee their homes in search of safety continues to reach record highs—it’s time to move out of emergency mode and engage in serious discussions about how to help displaced families integrate and begin to rebuild their futures."

The analysis found that the world’s 21st largest country:
- Has the fastest-growing population,
- Has one of the world’s youngest populations, with half the population under 18
- Ranks 4th to last on primary school attendance and almost last at the secondary school level
- Is among the most dangerous places for harmful practices like child marriage
- Is in the top half of the most urbanized countries
- Loses too many children to preventable heath conditions such as malaria and pneumonia
- Could have the 54th largest economy in the world if people were given adequate access to employment

As world leaders prepare to gather in New York for the UN General Assembly, Miles added: "Forcibly-displaced people face huge challenges, but if governments work together, along with non-governmental organizations and the private sector, we can improve their circumstances."

For more information, the complete report, and related case studies and infographics, visit: SavetheChildren.org/forcedtoflee.Join the conversation on Twitter using #forcedtoflee.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Vos Hestia

Child Refugee Crisis Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (September 12, 2016) — Save the Children’s search-and-rescue ship the Vos Hestia arrived at Trapani port in Sicily today with more than 300 refugees and migrants on board – including pregnant women, unaccompanied children and a newborn baby.

The migrants, who are mainly from West Africa, were transferred from an overcrowded rescue ship onto the Vos Hestia in the Central Mediterranean on Saturday afternoon, after the vessel responded to a call from the Italian Coast Guard.

More than 50 children on board have told Save the Children staff that they are traveling alone. Many of them said they were sent by their families in a desperate bid to escape a life blighted by conflict, persecution or extreme poverty.

Among the adults on board, one woman is more than nine months pregnant. She’s already been treated by Save the Children’s doctor on the ship and will be taken to a hospital as soon as disembarkation begins after landing.

According to the Italian Coast Guard, more than 2,000 refugees and migrants were rescued in the Mediterranean over the course of the weekend. Follow @SaveTheChildren on Twitter for regular updates on our search-and-rescue operation.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Save


Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (September 10, 2016) — “The announcement of a nationwide cessation of hostilities from Monday is very welcome, and couldn’t come soon enough for Syria’s children,” said Sonia Khush, Save the Children's Syria Director. “All parties to the conflict must put their interests aside to implement it immediately and fully, with independent monitoring in place to ensure it is being adhered to.

“This cessation of hostilities is desperately needed and it is imperative that parties to the conflict adhere to it, that all besieged and hard to reach areas are able to receive aid immediately, and that hospitals, schools and other civilian infrastructure are no longer targeted. Children cannot be plunged back into war, hunger and deprivation after a brief reprieve. We must build on this initial ceasefire to move toward sustained humanitarian access and a longer term pause in the fighting. That will allow us to start rebuilding the country’s devastated hospitals and schools.

“Across Syria, more than 250,000 children are estimated to be living under siege. We cannot abandon them. World powers, including the US and Russia, need to put maximum pressure on the parties to the conflict to open up immediate access to those children trapped in places like Madaya and al-Waer. Recent reports of a spate of child suicide attempts in Madaya only drives home the desperation and urgency of the situation.”

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (September 8, 2016) — The besieged Syrian town of Madaya has seen a worrying increase in suicide attempts and mental illness among children and young adults, Save the Children warned, as desperately needed aid has been blocked for more than four months.

Medical staff have reported that at least six teenagers — the youngest a 12 year old girl — and seven young adults have attempted suicide in the past two months, compared to almost no cases before July 2015 when the siege was first imposed.

Doctors say hundreds more people are suffering from psychological problems and mental illness including severe depression and paranoia, often brought on or exacerbated by the conditions they are living in. Specialized mental health care and even basic medical treatment is not available. In addition to the surge in suicide attempts, there are reports of a serious meningitis outbreak.

The town came to prominence at the start of this year when at least 65 residents were reported to have died from hunger and malnutrition. At the time, aid access was opened up and convoys of food and medicines were allowed to enter — but the siege has tightened again recent months, with no humanitarian relief allowed in since April.

Rula*, a teacher in Madaya, said the siege is taking a mental toll on children at her school: "The children are psychologically crushed and tired. When we do activities like singing with them, they don’t react at all, they don’t laugh like they would normally. They draw images of children being butchered in the war, or tanks, or the siege and lack of food."

"Most children are suffering from malnutrition and have trouble digesting food. They have infections in their digestive systems and diseases like meningitis," she said. "Now the hunger and siege is returning to how it was last winter, when children and even adults were dying from starvation. We don’t need sympathy, we need help in this crisis."

The siege is separating children from their families, including young children who were recently evacuated for medical treatment but were not allowed to be accompanied by their parents. Rula has been separated from two of her children, a boy and girl aged 15 and 12, for more than a year. They managed to leave to Lebanon with an aunt the day before the siege started.

"We heard that there were plenty of children who died of starvation," Rula’s daughter Samar* said. "Our mother told us that the situation was bad and that she was trying to leave with my father… she also told us that she is helping children. I don’t want anything bad to happen to her."

The worsening situation in Madaya is echoed in besieged areas across Syria. Save the Children and our partners in Syria fear that extreme lack of food, water, fuel and medicines, combined with often intense bombing, are being used to push entire communities from their homes to allow parties to the conflict to secure territory.

At the end of last month, the entire town of Daraya was evacuated after four years of siege, and there are signs this pattern is being repeated in Moadamiya and al-Waer in Homs with reports that some residents are leaving.

"The long siege of Madaya and other towns is taking its toll on people’s minds as well as their bodies," said Sonia Khush, Syria Director for Save the Children. "The pressure of living under these conditions for years on end without respite is too much to bear, especially for children. There are more than 250,000 children living under siege in Syria and while they are resilient, we see the signs of trauma and distress every day."

"Madaya and other besieged areas have been forgotten once again, but this time the world must not wait for people to starve to death before acting," Khush added. "It is clear that on all sides, civilians are being made to suffer in order to achieve military aims. Even in the midst of a brutal war, food, clean water, health care and freedom of movement are rights, not privileges. We need immediate and sustained access for humanitarian relief and much greater effort from the international community to halt the forcible evacuations of whole towns and communities."

According to the latest data, aid to the vast majority of Syria’s besieged areas has ground to a halt, with the UN warning that it was only able to deliver aid to two of the 19 areas it classifies as besieged in August. The previous month, aid was delivered to only around 9 percent of the 5.4 million people living in besieged and "hard to reach" areas.

*Names changed for protection.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (September 8, 2016) — Save the Children’s search and rescue ship, the Vos Hestia, has launched its first search and rescue mission for refugees and migrants crossing the Central Mediterranean.

Based out of the Sicilian port of Augusta, the 194-foot, Italian-flagged vessel has capacity to rescue 300 people at a time. It is equipped with two smaller inflatable boats operated by specialist crews who will carry out the rescue operations.

Once those who have been rescued are transferred onto the main vessel, Save the Children’s team will be on hand to meet people’s basic needs by providing food and water, safe spaces for children and medical facilities. There will also be child protection experts and cultural mediators on board to help identify children who are particularly vulnerable or travelling alone, to ensure they have all the support they need upon arriving in Italy.

The Italian Coast Guard, which is the organization that coordinates all search-and-rescue operations at sea in that area, will direct the vessel toward the boats with refugees and migrants that need help.

Throughout the mission, Save the Children will work closely with all other search-and-rescue organizations already operating in this stretch of sea, as well as with Save the Children Italy, with the aim of assisting those children who are most vulnerable.

Please follow @SaveTheChildren on Twitter for regular updates on our search-and-rescue operation.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



ICE CARD
Save the Children recommends all families complete three basic prep steps this National Preparedness Month, including making an ICE contact card for each child.
Credit: Save the Children

Media Contacts
Sarah Thompson 703.568.8611 (M)
Claire Garmirian 202.794.1606 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (August 29, 2016) — Save the Children, which is responding to the historic floods in Louisiana and has served more than 1 million U.S. children affected by disaster since Hurricane Katrina struck 11 years ago this week, urged families to take three basic "Prep Steps" this September — National Preparedness Month.

"We know that children are the most vulnerable when disaster strikes, but we also know what a difference basic preparedness actions can make for children," said Erin Bradshaw, senior director of Save the Children’s Get Ready Get Safe initiative. "This National Preparedness Month, Save the Children urges all families to take three essential prep steps to keep kids safe and build their resiliency."

Save the Children has also created "The Prep Step" song and dance to help children encourage their families to take these three basic prep steps, which are:

1) Make ICE contact cards for each child.
As kids return to school and child care, 69 million U.S. children are separated from their families daily. After Hurricane Katrina, there were more than 5,000 reports of missing children and it took seven months to reunite the last child with her family. Save the Children recommends creating an ICE, or In-Case-of-Emergency, card with basic health information and three emergency contacts. One contact should be out-of-state, since local phones, cell service and electricity can be unreliable during emergencies. ICE cards can be made quickly at no cost at www.SavetheChildren.org/ICE. Put one copy in your child’s bag or wallet and keep the other one with you.

2) Make a family emergency plan and practice it together. Almost two-thirds (65%) of American families still don’t have an adequate emergency plan or any at all, according to a recent survey by the National Center for Disaster Preparedness. Practicing your family’s plan with your children will help them know what to do, stay calm and follow adult direction in the event of an emergency. While some parents fear that talking about emergencies will scare their children, discussing risks and how to prepare for them in an age-appropriate manner actually helps children feel more protected and builds their resiliency.

3) Gather disaster supplies and pack a go-bag for each child. Don’t wait for a severe weather warning to get basic food, water, hygiene and safety items together. You’ll avoid long lines at the store and be better prepared – including for natural and manmade disasters that may occur with little-to-no warning. Creating a go-bag for each child helps ensure easy transport of essential medications, hygiene items and favorite activities in case of evacuation. Save the Children also recommends including a comfort item in each child’s bag. Help your children feel empowered by asking them to help decide what to pack.

To watch and learn "The Prep Step" song and dance and to link to resources to complete the three prep steps, go to www.SavetheChildren.org/PrepStep.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (August 27, 2016) — Save the Children is concerned about the fate of civilians being evacuated from the besieged town of Daraya, Syria. The movement of people to other areas of Damascus and to Idlib is ongoing today, with six buses apparently leaving this afternoon.

Sireen*, a teacher in Daraya, contacted Save the Children on Thursday night to say that families had no choice but to leave. She has previously said there are a high number of widows and orphans in the town. Sireen* said: "It’s obligatory, everyone is leaving, unfortunately, no one will stay in the town. The old people, the children, the young people, everyone has to leave. It’s a done deal."

Sonia Khush, Save the Children’s Syria Director, said: "What we are seeing today in Daraya is nothing to be celebrated – the answer to sieges is not to forcibly evacuate civilians. People there have paid a high price to end the siege and now must be treated with dignity and respect.

"There are concerns for the safety and freedom of movement of civilians who are being transferred into shelters in government-held areas. Mothers are particularly worried for the fate of their teenage sons as they leave Daraya. Families should be allowed to stay together and children, in particular, need to be protected.

"There are still around 250,000 children living in besieged areas across Syria. It shouldn’t necessitate an entire community leaving their homes for families to get access to vital food, water and medical supplies. There is a humanitarian imperative to ensure sustained and regular access for aid convoys to all besieged towns."

(*Name changed to protect identity)

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Aid Organization Launching a Response to Help Children in Affected Areas with Support from Trained Staff

Italy Earthquake

Photo: FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/Getty Images.

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (August 24, 2016) — Hundreds of children living in the three municipalities and surrounding areas affected by today’s deadly 6.2 magnitude earthquake in Italy will require immediate psychological support to deal with the trauma they have experienced, Save the Children is warning.

"We are deeply saddened over the loss of life, which includes children. Our thoughts go out to the victims and their families during this time," said Carolyn Miles, CEO of Save the Children.

"We are doing everything possible to reach the affected areas as soon as possible and to help affected children and their families."

Save the Children, in coordination with the Italian Civil Protection from Lazio Region, will be launching a response in Amatrice tomorrow, setting up a child-friendly space, a safe and protected environment where children and young people can receive support from trained staff and participate in various activities. This will allow them to play, socialize, learn, and express themselves as they recover from trauma.

"Children are the most vulnerable during emergencies and the impact of such events on their psyche is especially traumatic, as we saw in the aftermath of earthquakes in Emilia-Romagna and in L'Aquila, in 2012 and 2009, respectively."

"Our safe spaces will help children deal with the traumatic experience they’ve been through and provide them with a sense of normalcy. It is also important for children to be away from their televisions, so they aren’t re-traumatised by images of the disaster," Miles said

Save the Children responds to emergencies around the world, including national emergencies in Italy, such as in the aftermath of the Emilia-Romagna and L'Aquila earthquakes.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Save


Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (August 24, 2016) - Save the Children US has received a five-year (Sept 1, 2016-Aug 31, 2021) $72.9 million award from USAID/Ethiopia to provide ongoing assistance to the Government of Ethiopia (GOE) with its international partners, JHPIEGO, Land O’ Lakes, Population Services International, The Manoff Group, Tufts University and World Vision, and local NGOs, to strengthen the institutional and policy environment, develop its human resources for nutrition, and implement strategies that address poverty and food security and social and behavioral barriers to optimal nutrition. The USAID Growth through Nutrition project (Cooperative Agreement No: AID-663-A-16-0007) targets the “1000 Days” households—the critical window for preventing stunting—with activities and Social and Behavior Change Communications to promote the use of services, products, and practices for optimal nutrition. As a follow-on to USAID’s flagship ENGINE project, Growth through Nutrition will build on, expand, and strengthen many of ENGINE’s interventions while making significant new investments in agriculture and WASH, ensuring that nutrition efforts are coordinated across organizations, and harmonizing efforts within GOE agencies. Growth through Nutrition will continue ENGINE’s strategy, focused on supporting country-led policies and programs, strategies, and institutions at all levels, while bringing in additional government and local NGO involvement, as well as the private sector, and the full range of nutrition stakeholders who work on addressing stunting in Ethiopia through partnerships and collaboration.

Despite great progress, undernutrition rates in Ethiopia remain poor. The key child indicators of stunting, wasting and underweight are at 40%, 9% and 25% nationwide.The situation is worse in rural areas, and in Growth through Nutrition project areas, with stunting rates at 46% in Tigray, 44% in Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People (SNNP), 42% in Amhara and 38% in Oromia. In a renewed commitment to improving nutrition, the Government of Ethiopia (GOE) has declared its goal to end child undernutrition by 2030. This pledge made in the Seqota Declaration 2015 recognizes malnourished children have reduced cognitive, schooling and employment outcomes. The GOE also finalized the next five year (2016-2020) Nutrition Plan of Action. The Growth through Nutrition project will support the new initiative and NNP-2 reaching over 1 million “1000 Days” households, and aiming to reduce stunting by 20% over the life of the project. Concurrently the project will further strengthen the institutional and policy environment needed to sustain and increase reductions in stunting into the future, to ultimately contribute to achieving the GOE’s pledge.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Child Refugee Crisis Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (August 23, 2016) — The number of children crossing the Mediterranean compared to the same period last year has risen by more than two-thirds — and this journey is increasingly dangerous for migrants and refugees fleeing war, persecution and extreme poverty. More than 3,000 people have drowned in the Mediterranean already this year, an appalling death toll which is more than 40 percent higher than the same period in 2015. The vast majority have perished between North Africa and Italy.

Against this background of a significant and avoidable loss of life, Save the Children is launching a new search-and-rescue effort in the Mediterranean. The vessel will be operational starting in September with the aim of saving lives at sea, with facilities to rescue and accommodate approximately 300 people at a time.

The organization is launching a new appeal to help raise urgently needed funds, which will cover the cost of the vessel’s operation for the next 15 months.

Save the Children has worked at Italian ports for more than eight years, helping to protect children when they arrive on land, and we believe the urgency of the current situation requires us to launch a search-and-rescue operation. The aid agency will oversee humanitarian operations on the vessel and provide specialist staff including a team leader, cultural mediators, child protection, health and logistics staff. The Italian Coast Guard, which is the organization that coordinates all the search-and-rescue operations at sea in that area, will direct the vessel toward the boats with refugees and migrants who need help.

The Coast Guard has said it greatly appreciates the necessary contribution to search-and-rescue operations offered by aid agencies. In a recent meeting with representatives of aid organizations that help with the rescue of migrants, the Coast Guard said: "We share a common goal: to save lives at sea."

"Children are children, first and foremost. Whatever they are fleeing from, they have the right to be safe," said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. "We have an obligation to protect children and their families, whether they are in Europe already, or during their dangerous and deadly journey.

"The root causes are complex and many, but our response is simple: we must stop children drowning. Saving lives — not border control — should be everyone’s priority. The Mediterranean Sea cannot continue to be a mass unmarked grave for children.

"We have taken this decision to intervene at sea because we are convinced that, despite the extraordinary work already done by authorities as well as aid agencies, our initiative will make a valuable contribution to search-and-rescue operations in order to save lives."

The vessel, based out of Augusta, Italy, will be equipped with two smaller inflatable boats operated by specialist rescue crews. They will carry out the rescue operations, saving people either from capsized boats, or from drowning in the water itself. They will then transfer people to the main vessel where Save the Children’s specialist teams will be on hand to meet people’s basic needs by providing food and water, safe spaces for children and medical facilities. There will also be translators and cultural mediators to ensure we understand people’s needs and can communicate with them effectively and compassionately, including explaining what will happen next. The vessel will then take people to a safe port in Italy.

Save the Children’s onboard team will use our existing links and response work in Italy to ensure that children receive the support they need on arrival. This is particularly vital given that in 2016, twice the number of unaccompanied children have made the perilous crossing to Italy compared to the same period last year. Ninety percent of children that have landed on Italian shores in 2016 have done so without their parents.

Across the African continent, conflict, persecution and extreme poverty threaten children’s lives. With brutal conflict ravaging swathes of the Middle East, and more than 60 million people on the move worldwide, the refugee crisis is the moral test of a generation that shows no signs of abating. Children will continue to risk everything in the search for safety and better futures.

"Our work will start on board the rescue ship, identifying the needs of the most vulnerable and lone children, providing healthcare and psychological first aid," Miles said.

"On land, children need proper reception centers where they can regain their childhood — somewhere they’re safe, protected, fed, educated and given access to psychological support. Only then will fewer children go missing in Europe and more children face a brighter future."

Save the Children will, at all times, aim to cooperate with other aid agencies and the authorities who are working in the region.

When they arrive in Italy, refugees and migrants need food, shelter, legal advice, health services and protection from traffickers. Many have had horrific experiences on the long journey to Italy — starvation and abuse at the hands of gangs, long journeys on foot through the desert, rape and torture. Unaccompanied children are the most vulnerable.

Miles added: "Leaders must increase resettlement and offer humanitarian visas for refugees. September’s migration summit, co-hosted by U.S. President Barack Obama, is a political opportunity for change which must not be wasted.

"We also need a long-term plan to tackle the causes of unsafe and forced migration, including conflict, extreme poverty, human-rights abuses and climate change. Stopping the smuggling gangs will not stop people fleeing for their lives. Greater investment in jobs and education in the countries these people are coming from, or pass through, would make a huge difference to making life in those places more bearable and provide a credible alternative to risky migration."

To donate to Save the Children’s search and rescue ship visit: www.savethechildren.org/rescue-at-sea

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Gulf Coast Floods Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg, 202.247.6610
Claire Garmirian, 203.209.8545

BATON ROUGE, La. (August 22, 2016) — Thousands of Louisiana children remain displaced, distressed and unable to return to school, leaving them and their futures extremely vulnerable, Save the Children said Monday.

“President Obama’s visit to the flood zone is a moment for the media and the whole nation to grasp how widespread the damage here truly is.We hope the attention also spotlights the less-visible, but extremely concerning challenges that children here face,” said Sarita Fritzler, Save the Children emergency team leader in Baton Rouge.

With more than 60,000 households affected and more than 30,000 rescued, thousands of children face risks of serious emotional and developmental consequences in lieu of proper support. Close to 1,000of the most vulnerable children remain in temporary shelters and thousands more could be out of school or child-care for weeks or even months, Save the Children warned.

“Families here feel forgotten,” Fritzler added.“They’re in desperate need of a turning point that will drive more resources to their aid.If not, prospects for children – especially those from families with the fewest resources – could really be quite dire.”

Four years after Hurricane Katrina, one large-scale study of families displaced by the storm showed that 37 percent of children were suffering from serious emotional consequences.Louisiana is one of the poorest states in the nation and 28 percent of children live in poverty there.

“Our country can and must do better for Louisiana’s most vulnerable children this time around,” Fritzler said.

Save the Children is working to meet the urgent needs of displaced children and families and has created safe spaces in emergency shelters where children can play and begin to work through a variety of distressing experiences with caring experts. The organization is also working to fill recovery gaps by assessing the extent to which hundreds of area child care centers have been damaged and will need support to reopen.

“The sooner we can get children back in supportive learning environments, the sooner they can recover, build resiliency and continue their healthy development,” Fritzler said.

Save the Children has responded to children’s needs in emergencies around the world for nearly a century.Since mounting a major response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Save the Children has served more than 1 million U.S. children affected by disaster.

To support Save the Children’s Gulf Coast Floods Children’s Relief Fund, please donate here: www.Savethechildren.org/gulf-floods

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (August 18, 2016) — Save the Children is calling for a 48 hour ceasefire in Aleppo before the end of the week and immediate access for aid convoys to besieged areas, as the situation worsens across Syria.

The UN’s Special Envoy on Syria was forced to suspend today’s Humanitarian Taskforce meeting, amid reports that no aid has reached besieged areas for a month. People in areas like Madaya and Daraya say the situation is the worst it has been for months and supplies are running out, so all parties to the conflict must uphold their obligation to provide sustained humanitarian access.

In Aleppo, intense bombardment and siege of the city is continuing. A 48-hour ceasefire is the first step to bring in urgently-needed aid and evacuate casualties, but it is not enough — there must be an end to the violence. Save the Children’s partners in Aleppo say they’re no longer able to treat patients in their ambulances because they are in such a poor condition, with most missing doors and windows. Two of their eight ambulances were hit in airstrikes last week.

All they can do now is pick up victims and get them to the hospital as fast as possible, but with roads badly damaged by bomb craters, that is increasingly a challenge. Their work is further complicated by the fact that hospitals are overwhelmed with casualties, and often unable to take new patients.

Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children, said: "The photo of 5-year-old Omran Daqneesh, quietly sitting dazed and bloodied in the back of an ambulance in Aleppo, has bought home the horror of life in Syria for many children.

"Yesterday, one of our partners sent us a photo of another little boy. They had taken him to the hospital following an airstrike, wearing special traditional clothes that children in Aleppo wear for celebrations like birthdays. His gold and velvet jacket was ripped open, and he had bloody bandage on his head.

"They took him to the hospital — but he died of his injuries. Our partner said that the boy ‘turned from a future dream for his parents into a dead body — they only kissed him a goodbye kiss and that’s it.’"

"He was one of dozens of children who are reported to have been killed in Aleppo over the last few weeks. Across Syria, children are being bombed in their homes, schools and playgrounds. They are also under siege — we heard today from the UN that no aid has entered areas like Daraya for a month now. The situation is dire.

"We urgently need a 48-hour ceasefire this week as a first step to get injured children out of Aleppo and bring aid in. But we must also find a way to bring the siege and bombardment of civilians in Syria to an end. Children have already suffered too much."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Vernesha and her 3-week-old baby niece, Joy, are staying at a shelter in Baton Rouge after being driven from their home by rising floodwaters on Saturday, Aug. 13. They live together with Joy’s mother and two older sisters in an apartment that is now underwater. Photo by Stuart Sia / Save the Children.

Gulf Coast Floods Children's Relief Fund

Save the Children is Bringing the Healing Power of Play to Shelters

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.247.6610 (M)

Baton Rouge, LA (August 17, 2016) — Thousands of Louisiana children who have lost homes, belongings and their sense of security are in need of urgent assistance to protect their emotional and developmental wellbeing, Save the Children said.

"Thousands of children have been ripped from the lives they knew, and they have no idea what the future may hold," said Sarita Fritzler, Save the Children’s emergency team leader. "We know that loss and displacement during disasters can affect children’s mental health for years to come, and it’s essential that we offer kids a chance to be kids again as soon as possible."

Current sheltering conditions for more than 8,000 people can be especially challenging for families with young children, with shortages of cribs, changing stations, family spaces and private spaces for nursing at some locations putting children’s wellbeing at risk. Save the Children is working with the state of Louisiana and local partners, including the Red Cross, to address these needs and create safe spaces specifically for children.

Today, Save the Children will open its first Child-Friendly Space in the Lamar Dixon Expo Center shelter, run by the American Red Cross. With the support from generous donors, the organization also hopes to open more in the coming days.

Child-Friendly Spaces offer children a safe place to play, express themselves and begin processing a variety of distressing experiences. These spaces also give families a protected environment to leave their children as they register for assistance and go about the business of rebuilding their lives.

"We need help to reach more of the thousands of children in need and to support their families’ recovery," Fritzler said. "Offering children a safe place to play, not only allows them to have much-needed fun again, it helps them heal and build their resiliency. They will need that to bounce back from the devastation of these floods."

Save the Children is also distributing portable cribs, clothing and hygiene items to support displaced families in meeting the unique needs of children affected by the flooding. Shelter populations are expected to grow as families who temporarily stayed with others need longer-term housing solutions.

More than 20,000 people have been rescued and at least 10 deaths have been confirmed as a result of severe flooding that hit southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi over the weekend. Both Louisiana and Mississippi are under a state of emergency. Numerous schools are closed, homes and buildings are destroyed and roads and bridges are impassable.

Save the Children has responded to children’s needs in emergencies around the world for nearly a century. Since mounting a major response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Save the Children has served more than 1 million U.S. children affected by disaster.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (August 16, 2016) — The largest Yellow Fever epidemic in decades is hitting the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Angola, and could soon spread to the Americas, Asia and Europe, Save the Children warns.

The organization’s rapid response Emergency Health Unit (EHU) has deployed to support the DRC’s Ministry of Health with a mass vaccination campaign in the capital city of Kinshasa. The campaign, which begins Wednesday, is part of a last line of defense to stop the deadly virus spreading through the overcrowded city of more than 10 million.

The virus is a hemorrhagic fever and has claimed nearly 500 lives to date, with thousands of suspected cases. Alarmingly, the World Health Organization warns those figures could actually be 10 to 50 times higher. Yellow Fever is spread by mosquitoes, making rapid transmission in a hot, humid city like Kinshasa very likely, particularly when the rainy season starts next month and mosquito numbers spike.

The outbreak is the largest to hit the region for 30 years and has all but emptied global emergency stocks of vaccines. There are only 7 million emergency vaccines available for this campaign — too few to fully cover Kinshasa, let alone all of the DRC.

"There is no known cure for Yellow Fever and it could go global," said Heather Kerr, Save the Children’s Country Director for the DRC. "The mass vaccination campaign in Kinshasa needs to take place now so that we can try and stop Yellow Fever from spreading by land and air to more cities in Africa, and across the world."

Approximately 20 percent of people who have caught Yellow Fever during this outbreak have died. The final stages of the virus can cause bleeding from the eyes, ears and nose, organ failure and a condition known as jaundice, a yellowing of skin and eyes which originally gave the disease its name.

Save the Children’s 11-member rapid deployment EHU is staffed by experts from countries including Italy, China, Korea and the United States. They will support a vaccination campaign run by the DRC’s Ministry of Health, targeting nearly half a million people in Kinshasa for approximately 10 days.

Experts will also provide technical support to Ministry of Health staff by helping to secure the country’s ‘cold chain’: shuttling scarce supplies of vaccines to the vaccination sites while keeping them cold using a network of freezers and cool boxes. In addition, the EHU experts will treat the medical waste resulting from the campaign.

The same team successfully supported the Ministry of Health in vaccinating more than 221,000 people in the town of Boma in western DRC in May.

Following advice from the World Health Organization, Save the Children will provide support for the vaccination campaign that uses just one-fifth of a regular dose — to reach as many children and families as possible with the limited supplies that remain. A full dose of vaccine provides lifetime immunity; the smaller, so-called ‘fractionalized’ dose provides stop-gap immunity for about a year.

"We have to urgently reach as many children and families as we can with the supplies that are left, and this is the only way we are able to do that right now. We can only hope this will be enough to stop the epidemic from spreading any further," Kerr added.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Gulf Coast Floods Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.247.6610 (M)

Baton Rouge, LA (August 15, 2016) — Save the Children is deploying an emergency response team to Baton Rouge to establish Child-Friendly Spaces in emergency shelters and assess children’s most urgent needs in the wake of severe flooding in southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi.

"Thousands of children have been forced from their homes into shelters and many may have no home to return to anytime soon," said Sarita Fritzler, Save the Children’s emergency team leader. "Children are the most vulnerable when disaster strikes and it’s critical that their unique needs are addressed from the outset during emergencies like these terrible floods. We’re working closely with long-term local partners to make sure children are protected and cared for amidst the turmoil they and their families are experiencing."

Save the Children mounted a major response after Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and has served 1 million U.S. children affected by emergencies since then — including subsequent hurricanes in the Gulf Coast region. The organization also runs long-term education programs for children in high-poverty rural areas, including Head Start, early learning and literacy programs in the wider impact areas of Louisiana and Mississippi.

Save the Children’s local staff in Louisiana and Mississippi are currently working to verify the safety of children they serve, and also working to avert the destruction of two of the organization’s Head Start centers in Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana, which has been inundated in the floods. Save the Children’s education programs work to give children living in poverty opportunities to succeed in school and life that they might otherwise never have.

More than 20,000 people have been rescued and at least four deaths have been confirmed as a result of severe flooding that hit southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi over the weekend. The Weather Channel is reporting that more than 4 trillion gallons of water fell in southern Louisiana between Friday and Sunday. Both Louisiana and Mississippi are under a state of emergency. Numerous schools are closed, homes and buildings are destroyed and roads and bridges are impassable.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Aug. 14, 2016)— Save the Children and 11 other aid agencies* today called on the Saudi-led coalition to lift restrictions on Yemeni airspace in order to allow for the reopening of the country’s main airport, Sana’a International, and to allow humanitarian flights to resume.

A spokesperson on behalf of the agencies said: “The closure of Yemen’s main airport, which serves much of the country, is inexcusable when millions of Yemeni families are in urgent need of life-saving assistance.

“The closure only serves to make it even more difficult for aid agencies to get help to those that desperately need it, cutting off an important humanitarian assistance lifeline. All parties to the conflict must ensure that they allow humanitarian aid to reach the Yemeni population, in line with their obligations under international law.”

As a result of the conflict, over 14 million Yemenis are in need of food aid. One in three Yemeni children under five years old – approximately 1.3 million – are suffering from acute malnutrition.

Alongside humanitarian flights, commercial flights which also often bring in vital supplies and allow the free movement of civilians should also be allowed to recommence.

The spokesperson added: “The closure effectively seals Yemen off to the rest of the world at a time when half the population is malnourished and hospitals urgently require more medicine and medical supplies.

“We call on the Saudi-led coalition to immediately lift all airspace restrictions in order to allow for the airport to be re-opened without further delay.”

The announced closure of Yemen’s airspace for a period of 72 hours was made on Monday, 8 August. As of Sunday 14 August, the airspace remains closed.

The airspace closure coincides with a resumption of airstrikes on Sana’a and other parts of Yemen, which put the lives of Yemeni civilians as serious risk. Already the first civilian casualties – including children – from renewed aerial bombardments are being reported.

Editor’s Note: *The 12 aid agencies include ACF, ACTED, CARE, Danish Refugee Council, Global Communities Partners for Good, Handicap International, International Rescue Committee, INTERSOS, Mercy Corps, Norwegian Refugee Council, OXFAM and Save the Children.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (Aug. 11, 2016) — To recognize its first decade serving travelers, the hospitality powerhouse Wyndham Worldwide (NYSE: WYN) announced today a new global philanthropic partnership with Save the Children.

The launch of Wyndham Worldwide 10 years ago created a new type of hospitality company — one that brought together some of the most iconic travel brands, united by a set of core values, and a vision to create great experiences for every type of traveler.

"For the past ten years, philanthropy and volunteerism has been central to our culture and we have consistently strived to do business in a way our associates, partners and shareholders can be proud of," said Stephen P. Holmes, chairman and chief executive officer. "It made sense to us to celebrate our anniversary with a focus on serving others, especially children and families."

With operations in over 120 countries including the United States, Save the Children is the leading global non-profit organization focused exclusively on the wellbeing of children around the world. In its first global philanthropic partnership, Wyndham Worldwide will support Save the Children across its corporate locations around the world through workplace giving events, disaster relief and emergency fund raising, and promotion of the Save the Children signature child sponsorship program. The company’s initial donation of $250,000 will be focused on educational programs, helping to transform over 7,500 classrooms with learning materials to reach 250,000 students globally.

While this new partnership will create a way for all Wyndham Worldwide associates to make a more collective impact on a global scale, it’s only the latest in the company’s history of community support and volunteerism. Since 2006, the company has provided its U.S.-based associates with a paid day off "Wish Day" to volunteer in the community, as well as a company match for personal charitable donations. Most notably, the company holds annual campaigns and volunteer efforts supporting Christel House International, founded by Wyndham’s RCI brand founder Christel DeHaan; made community support a centerpiece of the annual Wyndham Championship on the PGA TOUR; and supported local efforts for Big Brothers Big Sisters, Special Olympics, community food banks, and more. Recently, the company also launched a youth scholarship program in the U.S.

To kick off the new Save the Children partnership, associates at the company’s New Jersey headquarters will assemble hundreds of emergency-preparedness kits for Save the Children, as well as clothing, food, and school supply drives for various local organizations.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (August 10, 2016) — The extensive misery and abuse inflicted on refugee and asylum seeker children and their families on the Pacific island of Nauru has again been brought to light through thousands of leaked incident reports, underscoring the need for the Australian Government to find an immediate resettlement solution, Save the Children says.

Many of the leaked documents, published by the Guardian Australia, involve reporting of incidents by Save the Children staff during our time providing welfare, education and recreational services for asylum seekers and refugees in the Nauru detention center and broader community between August 2013 and October 2015.

Mat Tinkler, Save the Children’s Director of Policy and Public Affairs in Australia said the global aid agency was surprised to see the reporting on a news media site. Save the Children was not involved in the release of the documents.

"We have respected the terms of our contact with the Australian Government, and the Australian Border Force Act, that prevents us from speaking publicly about the specific incidents and conditions that our staff witnessed in the Nauru detention center," Tinkler said. "But while we are surprised to see our incident reporting in the media, we are not surprised about the contents. Again it reinforces what we and others have been saying in broader terms: that Nauru is no place for vulnerable children and continuing to leave them to languish there is doing significant harm."

"The [Malcolm] Turnbull Government should not be surprised either. Save the Children has told the government through various channels of these incidents and the broader conditions and problems on Nauru over several years."

Tinkler said the documents reveal that Save the Children consistently informed Australia’s Immigration Department about each incident of physical abuse, sexual abuse and self-harm involving asylum seekers and refugees — many of them young children — that staff observed on Nauru.

Save the Children later produced an analysis of these reports, which detailed clearly how they broke down by age, type of incident and the harm being caused to children. This analysis was provided to a now defunct Senate inquiry into offshore detention and directly to senior members of the federal Cabinet.

"If the Government of Australia knew of the abuse and self-harm occurring under its watch, why hasn’t it acted?" Tinkler added.

Save the Children is calling for an immediate resettlement solution to be found for refugees and asylum seekers who have been left in limbo on Nauru and Manus Island, in some case for over three years, either in Australia or in an appropriate, developed and humane third nation.

The Australian Government should also provide more safe and humane pathways for refugees to be resettled by increasing its humanitarian intake. And it should restart negotiations with neighboring governments to establish a regional protection framework for asylum seekers.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



CR7 App - STC
Cristiano Ronaldo fans can now take a photo with him anytime and anywhere, while also helping kids in need. Save the Children photo.

Save the Children Global Artist Ambassador Cristiano Ronaldo Introduces App for Fans to Take Selfies with the World’s Most Charitable Athlete; A Portion of Worldwide Proceeds to Benefit Save the Children

 

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Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (Aug. 9, 2016) — Fans can now take a selfie with soccer superstar Cristiano Ronaldo wherever and whenever they please, and help kids at the same time. Today, the master of selfies has launched his CR7Selfie: Fans with a Cause app, in which fans can take a selfie with Ronaldo in one of several different outfits and poses – in a tux, holding the European Golden Boot, singing karaoke, to name a few – then share it with their friends, family, followers and other CR7 fans on various social media platforms. Available globally on Apple App and Google Play stores, the app, developed by 7Windows Consulting, will cost $1.99* to download, with a portion of worldwide proceeds of every download going to Save the Children.

"I am thrilled to launch this app to engage with my fans in a new way," said Cristiano Ronaldo. "From the very beginning, I knew that I wanted this app to support a charitable cause I believe in. I have been involved with Save the Children for several years now and knew they were the best partner for this app. As a father and Global Artist Ambassador for Save the Children, I am committed to working towards giving all children a better and brighter future. I invite everyone to be a fan with a cause, so be sure to download the app, take a selfie with me anytime, anywhere and everywhere – and at the same time help kids in need!"

In the app, fans can select from among 68 photos of Ronaldo in different outfits and poses, and scroll through 39 filters to apply to their selfies. New photos of Ronaldo will be made available at select times throughout the year through in-app purchases for 99 cents each.* Save the Children also will benefit from a portion of worldwide proceeds of every in-app purchase.

Funds raised for Save the Children through CR7Selfie: Fans with a Cause app sales will go to giving children around the world a healthy start in life, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. In 2015 alone, Save the Children helped 185 million children through its global work in 120 countries.

Cristiano Ronaldo was named a Global Artist Ambassador for Save the Children in January 2013. With over 230 million followers on social media, the world-renowned soccer player regularly uses his platforms to shine a much-needed spotlight on the most pressing needs of children around the globe and to engage his fans to do more to help children in need, both in their own communities and all over the world.

"We are so grateful to Cristiano Ronaldo for this new partnership and the work he has done in bringing attention to children’s issues around the world," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "One in 11 children is out of school worldwide. Refugee children fare even worse; they are five times more likely to be out of school than non-refugee children. Education is critical to helping children build opportunities for success, as well as realize their dreams. Together, this partnership and the power of social media can have an incredible impact on children globally, opening the door to learning and other opportunities to put them on the path to reach their full potential."

To help children, supporters can download the app and smile, shoot and share with Ronaldo by visiting CR7Selfie.com, and posting and tagging their photos to @Cristiano and @SaveTheChildren on Facebook, Google Plus, Instagram, Twitter and Weibo.

*The price of the app may vary slightly according to market. Please check your local Apple App and Google Play stores for more details.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (August 2, 2016) — Recent efforts by the US government, with EU support, to water down language on the detention of refugee and migrant children are deeply concerning and go against international standards, warns Save the Children.

Commenting on negotiations in New York in advance of the UN refugee and migration summit in September, Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children said: "This Summit was meant to bring member states together to find new solutions to the most pressing global challenge of our time — to help millions of people on the move, including those fleeing war and persecution. Instead, UN member states are arguing over existing rules and values. Anything less than full support for ending the practice of detaining children on the basis of their or their parents’ migration status would be a huge step backwards.

Children made up more than half of the 65 million people displaced by conflict and persecution in 2015, and are particularly vulnerable to exploitation and abuse while on the move and at borders. Together with other leading NGOs, Save the Children has been calling for Member States at the Summit to recognize their obligations under international and regional human rights treaties to protect children’s best interests and to commit to ending their detention.

"The de facto detention of children — the likes of which we are seeing on the Greek Islands — must not become a new normal. World leaders must live up to their existing commitments to ensure that the most vulnerable people on the move, including children, are treated with dignity and have their rights respected," added Miles.

"The EU and US should be raising the bar, not lowering it. While we have seen some positive developments in other parts of the political declaration, these negotiations should result overall in an ambitious and meaningful solution for millions of refugee and migrant children, which focuses first and foremost on their protection. This means developing a global system that ensures governments share responsibility for welcoming, protecting and assisting refugee and migrant children, and setting out a clear roadmap for a new deal on safe, orderly and regular migration that respects human rights.

"A Global Compact that threatens to leave children at borders at increased risk is not a solution, and should be rejected."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (August 1, 2016) — Torrential rainfall across a handful of countries in South Asia has burst river banks, washed entire homes away and left millions in need of humanitarian assistance.

More than 160 people have reportedly been killed, and Save the Children has launched an emergency flood response, including in three of India’s hardest-hit states where nearly 5 million people are currently affected.

Save the Children will immediately begin distributing basic necessities like water, food, tarps, hygiene kits, bed sheets and floor mats to those in greatest need, and initially aims to reach more than 100,000 people in India, including 50,000 children.

"Being prepared enables us to respond quickly and effectively to minimize the effects of any emergency on the lives of children and their families," said Thomas Chandy, head of Save the Children in India.

Save the Children also plans to also mount an emergency response in Bangladesh, where nearly 1.5 million people have been affected by the nation’s worst flooding since 1998.

"The water level of most of the rivers will continue to rise in the next 48 hours, which may cause a deterioration in the flood situation in Bangladesh, according to the Bangladesh Flood Forecasting and Warning Center," said Sharon Hauser, acting Bangladesh Country Director.

"In some places, rivers are flowing at five feet above ‘danger’ levels. Already, more than 400 schools have been closed and there’s an increased risk of diseases like diarrhea and cholera. Save the Children is working with the government to determine how we are best able to support the most vulnerable."

Meanwhile in Nepal, heavy rains have caused severe flooding and landslides in several parts of the country, many of which were impacted by last year’s earthquake. Save the Children is responding in severely affected communities in four districts by providing kitchen and hygiene kits, water and sanitation assistance and health support.

Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children said: "Save the Children has a long history of responding to humanitarian crises in the region, including to last year’s earthquake in Nepal. Our thoughts are with the people of India, Bangladesh and Nepal during this difficult time, and we are working swiftly to get people the emergency supplies they need."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 30, 2016) — Save the Children has been working with their partner in the region around the clock to keep the bombed maternity hospital in Idlib open. It’s currently operating at a reduced level and only able to support emergency cases and non-surgical deliveries. C-section deliveries cannot be performed because some of the equipment and generators were damaged in the attacks. Repair work is underway.

Medical staff have told us that the hospital’s ambulance was damaged during the bombings, but the staff have borrowed one from a nearby facility to transfer women who need c-sections or who are having complicated deliveries to other emergency facilities in surrounding areas. Most of the hospital furniture has been damaged in the attacks, along with three incubators and other critical equipment.

Sonia Khush, Syria Director for Save the Children, said: "We are so grateful for the resilience and resourcefulness of the hospital staff in Idlib, in such tremendously difficult circumstances. They are working around the clock to make sure the hospital continues to support women and children in their hour of need. All labor and incubator rooms have been moved to the underground floors for safety and staff have borrowed a generator and an ambulance from other facilities to help them remain operational. The outpatient department has been closed until further notice, but there are 6 midwives who work at the hospital who also live in the same town who can assist with home deliveries."

The casualties remain at two people killed, six injured, and a six-month pregnant woman lost both her legs, not just one as was previously reported.

To support Save the Children’s efforts to provide life-saving help to children in Syria, visit http://savethechildren.org/Syria.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Bombing of Maternity Hospital in Idlib
A Save the Children supported maternity hospital was bombed in Idlib, Syria, on July 29, 2016. Two casualties have been confirmed and several babies, patients and staff were injured. Save the Children provides the hospital with funding for overall operations, medicine, medical supplies and equipment, and technical training and advice to doctors and medical staff. Photo Credit: Save the Children.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 29, 2016) — Save the Children is outraged by today’s airstrike on a vital maternity hospital run by our partners in Idlib. The bombing took place at approximately 8:00 a.m. ET today, hitting the front of the hospital building. Two people were killed in the attack.

Several babies were injured when their incubators crashed to the floor, and a woman who was six months pregnant had her leg severed. Two other women have shrapnel wounds to the stomach and a number of patients and staff have suffered light injuries. At approximately 12:00 p.m. ET today, the hospital’s deputy manager said fighter planes were still circling overhead.

At the time of the bombing, two operations were underway and a woman was in labor. The hospital is currently thought to have ceased functioning except for the emergency room, and the generator was damaged in the attack. It is the only maternity facility of its kind in the area, serving more than 1,000 women and children a month and delivering hundreds of babies. Save the Children has been supporting it for more than two years.

Sonia Khush, Syria Director for Save the Children, said: "Our thoughts are with the brave Syrian staff who run the hospital and the families affected. Bombing a maternity hospital, which is helping women living under the shadow of war to give birth safely is a shameful act, whether it was done intentionally or because due care was not taken to avoid civilian areas.

"There is no excuse, and unfortunately this is only the latest in a series of strikes on health facilities in Syria. We condemn these attacks, which are illegal under international law, in the strongest possible terms. We need an immediate ceasefire across Syria and an end to the appalling bombing of medical facilities"

To support Save the Children’s efforts to provide life-saving help to children in Syria, visit http://savethechildren.org/Syria.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 29, 2016) — A Save the Children-supported maternity hospital in Idlib, Syria was bombed today. The hospital serves over 1,300 women and performs over 300 deliveries each month. Save the Children is working to confirm reports of casualties among the patients and hospital staff.

Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles said: "We are deeply saddened by the tragic bombing of the maternity hospital in Idlib. Our thoughts and hearts are with the patients, staff, and their families."

"Continued bombings and attacks in Syria are leading to an increasingly desperate situation for the estimated 100,000 children trapped in the besieged areas. Indiscriminate attacks on civilians must end. Humanitarian aid must be allowed to reach those who need it most," said Miles.

Save the Children supports the hospital through its partner, Syria Relief. The hospital has six incubators for premature babies, and an outpatient clinic for supporting pregnant women and providing after-delivery care. The closest hospital providing similar services is 43 miles away.

To support Save the Children’s efforts to provide life-saving help to children in Syria, visit http://savethechildren.org/Syria.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 29, 2016) — The number of unaccompanied children making the perilous journey to Italy from countries such as Nigeria and Egypt — often to escape war, hunger and violence — has more than doubled year-on-year, according to Italian government figures.

More than 10,500 unaccompanied children arrived in Italy by sea between January and June 2016 — more than double the number from the same period in 2015, and almost as many as there were during all of last year. These children are some of the most vulnerable to trafficking and exploitation.

The figures come as a new report is launched by Save the Children Italy, which reveals the brutal and increasingly sophisticated tactics used by traffickers to force children and young women into prostitution and hard labor, saddling them with up to $55,000 in ‘debt’ for the cost of their journeys across the Mediterranean.

The organization found that girls as young as 13, from countries like Nigeria and Romania, are being tricked into believing they will secure jobs like babysitting, waitressing or hairdressing — sometimes by their own teachers and boyfriends — but are then forced into prostitution, made to rent sidewalk space to sell sex and are subjected to physical, sexual and emotional violence.

Save the Children’s President and CEO Carolyn Miles said: "It’s shocking that in this day and age, so many vulnerable children are being subjected to this kind of violence, manipulation and exploitation."

"They make the dangerous journey to Europe on their own seeking safety and a better life, but instead find themselves trapped in a cycle of abuse. Traffickers are becoming increasingly cunning in their methods to recruit and trap children — particularly those in the most vulnerable situations — and it has to end. No child deserves a life of enslavement," Miles said.

In a series of interviews with unaccompanied child migrants and refugees, researchers found that girls are often subjected to physical and sexual violence by their handlers on their journey to Italy. There is evidence that some girls contract sexually transmitted diseases or become pregnant, in which case they are often forced to have an abortion or are eventually blackmailed with threats against their babies to ensure they don’t try to escape.

To ensure the girls — especially those from Nigeria — repay their extortionate debts, traffickers can threaten their families with violence and in some cases subject them to voodoo rituals where they are manipulated into believing that if they try to leave, they will be stricken down by madness or death.

Jessica* from Nigeria was 17 when her boyfriend convinced her to take the journey to Italy. She had no idea that when she arrived, she would have to become a sex worker to survive and pay her way. "One day I called my boyfriend’s sister who told me that I had to give their family $55,000 to pay for my trip to Italy. I found out that my aunt in Nigeria had been threatened and that my younger sister had been beaten. They threatened me with voodoo, and I was afraid."

While the majority of girls are forced into the sex trade, boys from countries like Egypt are subjected to child labor and criminal activity, like theft and drug dealing, to repay their debts. Traffickers use social networking sites such as Facebook to lure boys with the promise of a better life in Europe and the chance to help lift their families out of poverty.

In Rome, Egyptian boys are forced to work 12-hour days, seven days a week washing cars, earning around $2 per hour. Employers often refuse to pay them for weeks, claiming that they must complete an apprenticeship first. In some cases, they become victims of sexual abuse or involved in illegal activities.

In Turin, they are generally made to work more than 10 hours per day in the restaurant or construction business, and are typically paid between $220 and $330 per month.

Many boys also face violence and abuse at the hands of their employers and report feeling traumatized, according to the organization’s frontline workers.

Save the Children teams are present at every landing in southern Italy providing support to children and their families as they arrive, including legal advice. The organization also runs day and night shelters in Rome, Milan and Turin for vulnerable refugee and migrant children, and has launched a multi-lingual helpline to provide assistance to migrant children. Save the Children works across the refugee route in Europe supporting and protecting children, as well as in their countries of origin, from Niger to Syria.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 29, 2016) — Aid workers in Aleppo have reported horrific conditions for casualties and health workers, with limb amputations and head trauma the most prevalent injuries after weeks of heavy bombardment in the now besieged eastern part of the city.

The field coordinator for Shafak, an NGO which runs a network of ambulances around the city, estimated that children comprise about 35 percent of all casualties. He also reported that the death rate, particularly among child casualties, is rising because they can no longer evacuate patients with head injuries to Turkey as they would have done previously due to the siege.

According to the Save the Children partner, hospitals are completely overwhelmed and ambulances are running out of fuel so they can now only attend the scenes of major airstrikes. They also report that it’s too dangerous to attempt to leave the city and there is bombing and violence along the supposed safe routes out, although we cannot independently verify these reports at this stage.

Rami*, whose name has been changed to protect his identity, said: "Life in Aleppo city is becoming more like living next to an active volcano… you don’t know when you’ll be killed. It’s the first time in the last four years where we see this kind of bombardment and destruction. Especially when they [children] hear the sound of an explosion or the jetfighter, they start screaming, hugging you and crying.

"Imagine the emergency room in any of the field hospitals doesn’t have more than five or six beds, and when responding to a massacre they receive up to 30-40 injured at the same time. So most of the patients are treated on the floor of the hospital… and of course all this is getting worse because of the intense bombardment with the lack of the staff and equipment."

Rami* reported previously attending the scene of an airstrike, and finding children buried beneath the rubble. "A child less than ten years old ran to me shouting "sir please put my arm back". His left arm was amputated and he held it with his right hand. He was begging me to put it back, and this is only one of so many tragedies that we see."

Sonia Khush, Syria Director for Save the Children, said: "The situation for an estimated 100,000 children trapped under siege and bombardment in Aleppo is desperate and needs our urgent help. The world cannot turn its back while children are bombed and then denied medical treatment – we need an end to the indiscriminate attacks on civilians and immediate and unfettered access for humanitarian aid.

"A permanent ceasefire and an end to the siege must be the first priority. ‘Humanitarian corridors’ are not humanitarian if they are enforced against the population’s will and are used as an excuse to continue a siege against civilians, which deprives children of food, water, electricity and medical care."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syrian Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 27, 2016) — Northwest Syria is on the verge of a humanitarian catastrophe as aid is prevented from reaching people in need and deadly bombing intensifies, Save the Children has warned. Tens of thousands of children in Aleppo are in danger of running out of food, water and healthcare within weeks unless the worsening siege of the city and targeting of hospitals ends immediately. New airstrikes have also devastated the city of Idlib, forcing thousands of families there to flee their homes.

As the International Syria Support Group (ISSG) met in Geneva on Tuesday, Save the Children called for an immediate ceasefire and unimpeded access for vital humanitarian aid.

Save the Children partners working in Aleppo say food and fuel are the most urgent needs. Bread, fruit and vegetables are already running out since the last road in and out of the city was cut off, putting an estimated 300,000 people — 60 percent of them women and children — under siege. Almost constant bombing is making the situation even worse. This week an airstrike hit a warehouse of a Save the Children partner, damaging food supplies for 10,000 families that had been put in place before the siege. The price of fuel — desperately needed to keep water pumps and medical services operational — has tripled.

Hospitals, schools and other vital civilian infrastructure are being attacked indiscriminately, with at least nine medical facilities bombed in the past week in Aleppo and Idlib. The medical laboratory of the interim Idlib Health Directorate, which included the only CT scan in the city, has been badly damaged. Aleppo’s only pediatric hospital has been bombed and closed down, and several ambulances also damaged. Patients in critical condition are prevented from leaving Aleppo for treatment due to the siege, putting their lives at risk. Ongoing airstrikes mean emergency response teams are struggling to rescue children and families trapped under the rubble of buildings.

One Save the Children partner in Idlib, where there have been more than 100 airstrikes reported in the past few days, said: "The streets are totally empty and the smell of blood and gunpowder fills the air. Thousands of families are fleeing the city into the countryside."

An estimated 4,000 families (around 20,000 people) have fled Idlib in the past week. Save the Children and local partners are distributing cash to help them buy food and essential supplies, and running four mobile health clinics in the area to help sick children and mothers.

Sonia Khush, Save the Children’s Syria Director, said the ISSG must take urgent action: "Civilians in Aleppo have had years of being bombed and now they face being starved as well. Supplies are set to run out within weeks unless aid is allowed in. It is scandalous that over the last six months we have heard continued failed promises to get aid into besieged areas of Syria, whilst what could be the biggest siege yet is unfolding before our eyes. International credibility is on the line. Local doctors and aid workers are working in some of the most difficult and dangerous conditions imaginable, trying to save lives while bombs fall around them. Aid must urgently be allowed in before more children die."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Save the Children Calls for Critical Support for the SADC Regional Humanitarian Appeal

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 27, 2016) — As a result of one the strongest and most destructive El Niño phenomena ever recorded, the lives of 26.5 million children are now at risk of high levels of malnutrition, water shortages, and disease across ten countries in Eastern and Southern Africa.

"While the strength of El Niño is set to decrease over the first part of 2016, its full force will be felt over the coming months; harvests will continue to fail; families will run out of essentials as their livelihoods dry up or are washed away; and children forced from their homes will leave healthcare, security and loved ones behind," warns Save the Children’s East and Southern Africa Regional Director, David Wright.

An emergency regional El Niño appeal has been launched by The South African Development Community (SADC) today and is designed to raise much-needed funds for the millions of people hit by drought and extreme weather conditions.

The appeal launch also coincides with the Regional Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s (RIASCO) formal El Niño response action plan that deals with immediate humanitarian needs as well as building the long-term resilience of affected communities to handle future climate shocks.

"Southern Africa governments and partners have proactively responded to the El Niño phenomena since 2015 but it is now evident that the sheer scale of the crisis far outstrips the coping capacities of communities and the resources of governments, putting decades of development gains at risk," says Wright.

"The launch of the regional humanitarian appeal today is a strong indication that donors, national governments and the humanitarian community must act much faster to save lives of children and families. All of us must do much more, as quickly as possible."

The high probability of a La Niña event from late 2016, usually defined by heavy, unpredictable rainfall and colder weather, will likely lead to further extreme weather conditions with potentially disastrous consequences including agricultural and crop reductions or destruction, disease outbreaks, and extreme flooding.

"The onset of La Niña could exacerbate the negative impacts of El Niño and stretch affected communities to their absolute limits. Proactive and early action measures need to be put in place to prepare and protect communities alongside the urgent need for humanitarian assistance now," says Wright.

"Water shortages remain a key concern. Many health facilities and schools are in critical need of improved water supply and sanitation facilities to enable the continuity of services. Children face protection risks as families and communities move in search of work, food, water and grazing land for animals.

"Children are also finding it difficult to stay in school, due to hunger or lack of water. Being the global epicenter of the AIDS pandemic, the El Niño crisis is making life even more precarious for children affected by HIV."

Save the Children urgently calls on donors and Southern African governments to swiftly, collaboratively and generously respond to SADCs regional humanitarian appeal to contain the crisis that is likely to continue into 2017, and to ensure that vulnerable people can access relief.

"It is vital that donors, national governments and humanitarian agencies work together to bring life-saving support to the urgent needs of children and women and ensure that the significant development progress that has been achieved for children over the last few decades is not reversed by the effects of El Niño," adds Wright.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 25,2016) — Almost 400 children were killed and another 1,121 maimed between January and June this year in a six-month period that saw the highest number of civilian casualties in Afghanistan since the United Nations began counting in 2009.

According to the report by the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan, nearly a third of all civilian deaths or injuries were children, with the total number of child casualties up 18 percent compared to the same period last year.

"These findings are truly shocking, and represent a significant backtrack on progress for Afghan children," said Save the Children’s Afghanistan Country Director Ana Locsin.

"Save the Children condemns any attacks on children, and we urge all parties in Afghanistan to make the protection of civilians, especially children, a priority."

"Aside from the obvious risk to their lives, witnessing civilian attacks can cause a great deal of distress for children, often leading to psychosocial issues and impacting their longer term development," Locsin said. "Children are seeing their family members killed or injured, which can have huge knock on effects on their lives, especially if the breadwinner can no longer work or take care of them."

"Children are always innocent victims — they have no part in conflict and, as such, must be protected from harm."

Civilian casualties in Afghanistan between January and June, 2016, totaled 5,166, reflecting a four percent increase on the same period last year. More than 155,000 Afghans became displaced during the six month period, representing a 10 percent increase on 2015.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (July 22, 2016) - More than 2,000 refugees are arriving in Northern Uganda daily after fleeing the on-going threat of violence in war-torn South Sudan. 90% of the people crossing are women and children, including vulnerable mothers with newborn babies.

Save the Children aid worker at the border, Justine Abenaitwe, said: "We’ve seen extremely vulnerable children coming into Uganda – many of whom have been forced to sleep outside because of the onset of heavy seasonal rains. The daily average has increased nearly ten-fold from the usual 200–300 refugees who were crossing before the fighting broke out in South Sudan less than two weeks ago.

"We are deeply concerned about the escalating numbers of unaccompanied and separated children who have made the journey alone and are susceptible to neglect or abuse. Even without the risk of being killed in the conflict, South Sudan is statistically the worst place in the world to be a child. Half the children are not in school."

Most refugees are coming from Eastern Equatoria state in addition to smaller numbers from Juba, with renewed sporadic fighting and hunger cited as the main reasons for flight. In the first five months of the year, the number of severely malnourished children admitted to Save the Children centers has tripled in comparison to the same period last year.

"These people only got a chance to leave South Sudan when the Uganda People’s Defence Force (UPDF), crossed into South Sudan to evacuate Ugandan traders. That is when civilian vehicles, which had been waiting in hiding, joined the secure convoy and lone travelers ran and hopped onto some of the trucks," says Abenaitwe.

"In just three hours on Tuesday afternoon, a total of 4,149 South Sudanese refugees, mainly women and children, entered the Ugandan town of Elegu on the border with South Sudan. One refugee told us that many South Sudanese men are staying in the country to fight, including boys as young as 13 years old."

Thousands of people are being relocated to camps and reception centers and the number of new arrivals is expected to rise in the coming days.

Save the Children is currently working on the construction of Child Friendly Spaces including one on two acres of land in Pagirinya where three to six-year-olds will come for school lessons; the provision of clothes, blankets, hygiene kits, mosquito nets and basic cooking utensils; the sensitization of refugees regarding child protection issues; and registration and case management for separated and un accompanied children.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Note to Editors:

Save the Children Stabilization centers support severely malnourish children. The numbers have increased from just over 400 to well over 1600.



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Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (July 22, 2016) —The humanitarian crisis in Yemen is worsening by the day, with the latest statistics revealing more than 14 million people are in desperate need of food.

One in three Yemeni children under five – approximately 1.3 million – are suffering from acute malnutrition.

Nine governorates are now in a state of emergency, just one step away from being declared a 'famine', including the besieged city of Taiz and the major port city of Al Hodeidah.

Malnourished babies

Footage gathered by Save the Children shows babies aged between three and twelve months fighting for life in intensive care units at Al-Sabeen Hospital in the capital Sana’a.

Edward Santiago, Save the Children’s Country Director in Yemen, said: "We’re particularly alarmed at spiraling malnutrition amongst babies and children. Every day, more and more families face an increased risk of being pushed into acute malnutrition as supplies dwindle, prices skyrocket and poverty rises.

"Even when Yemeni families can get their critically ill babies to a functioning hospital, the electricity supply is patchy and fuel to run back up generators is scarce, meaning lifesaving equipment does not always function properly.

"The catastrophic food crisis in Yemen is clearly getting worse, and as we have seen so many times, it’s babies and children who suffer the consequences most."

The conflict, between a Saudi Arabia-led coalition and armed opposition groups including Houthis, has killed more than 6,000 and cut off food, fuel, clean water and medical supplies.

While a de facto blockade on imports by the Saudi-led coalition has now eased, stocks of food and fuel remain perilously low. Food is 60% more expensive than before the conflict began in March 2015, and cooking gas is 76% more expensive.

The latest statistics reveal more than 2.7million people – out of a population of – have been displaced owing to the conflict, meaning they have lost their livelihoods and jobs. So even when people can find food to buy, many cannot afford it and their families go hungry.

Traumatized children

With more than 1,600 schools destroyed or shut, it is unsurprising that a third of school age children in Yemen do not have access to education.

Santiago said: "The psychological impact of the conflict has been devastating for children with many showing symptoms associated with distress and trauma including anxiety, low-self-esteem and lack of concentration.

"We support 300 children in our Child Friendly Spaces in Sana’a – giving them the opportunity to play, learn, create and spend time with their friends in a safe place where they can forget what they’ve been through. But ultimately their recovery requires an environment in which they are not in daily fear for their lives."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Note to Editors:

The latest malnutrition statistics were published by the IPC in June 2016 to cover the period June through September 2016: http://www.ipcinfo.org

According to the UN, 1.3 million children under five years old are suffering from acute malnutrition, with 320,000 suffering from severe acute malnutrition. This represents almost a third of around 4.5 million children under five in Yemen: http://www.savethechildren.org.uk

Alongside other parties to the conflict in Yemen, the Saudi Arabia-led Coalition was listed in the UN 'list of shame' for violations against children – for killing and maiming children, and attacking schools and hospitals – published on June 2nd. It was promptly removed following pressure from Saudi Arabia.

Save the Children has been working in Yemen since 1963.



Save the Children Calls for G20 Leaders to Adopt Equitable Policies to Benefit All Children, Improve Child Wellbeing

Media Contact: Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, CT (July 22, 2016) — Although the United States has the world’s largest economy, it ranks ninth among 19 of the world’s wealthiest nations on child wellbeing, according to Save the Children’s newest annual Child Prosperity Index.

Released today ahead of the G20 Summit in China this September, the index ranks Germany top for the second time running, followed by France and Japan.

In comparing indicators in eight areas affecting child wellbeing across the G20 nations (which also includes the European Union), the United States scores below average on environment, health and gender equality. The U.S. also comes in 10th on safety, largely due to high homicide rates.

The highest the U.S. ranks in any area affecting child wellbeing is in income. However, despite having the highest per capita income, income inequality pulls the U.S. ranking down to fifth.

Likewise, on education, a high U.S. showing on years of schooling was pulled down by the student achievement indicator, where the U.S. is outranked by China, Republic of Korea, Japan, Canada, Germany, Australia, the U.K and France. The index also covers infrastructure and employment.

“The United States may be the most powerful and prosperous nation in the world, but we are far from number one on helping children realize their full potential. Millions of children are paying the price and we must do better,” said Carolyn Miles, president & CEO of Save the Children.

“Investing in early education is key to helping all children succeed in school so they may break the cycle of poverty and contribute to a stronger, safer society for all,” Miles said.

The G20 Summit is a powerful opportunity for the world’s economic and political elite to improve the lives of children in their own nations and across the planet.

Save the Children is asking finance ministers to adopt three guarantees for children worldwide: 1) Make finance fair for the poorest and most excluded families through tax reform and funding education and health services, 2) Make sure the poorest families can participate in and benefit from economic growth and 3) Commit to reducing income inequality while tracking child wellbeing.

“The index also reflects some great advancements in child wellbeing, such as the dramatic increase in school attendance and reductions in child mortality rates in India,” said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. “But the poorest children in both wealthy and developing nations still face unacceptable risks of preventable death and educational and economic exclusion.”

Save the Children invests in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. In the United States and around the world, we give children a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (July 20, 2016) — Children and their families are taking huge risks to flee areas held by militant groups in Iraq ahead of an expected military offensive, Save the Children is warning.

More than 30,000 people have fled the cities of Mosul and Hawija in the last few months, often on foot and under fire, with hundreds of thousands more expected to leave as the situation escalates. Leaders meeting at the Iraq Pledging Conference in the US today must urgently agree funding to ensure that children who have escaped after living under extremist rule for more than two years can be properly looked after. Conditions in camps where children have sought refuge are rapidly deteriorating, with severe overcrowding and families sleeping in the open without clean water.

Save the Children is working with families who have recently made it out from Mosul and the surrounding areas. Abed, the father of two boys aged six and four, said: "On the journey we had to pass through the mountain which was closer to ISIS. The children were crying and screaming and we had to try to make them quiet. One sound at the wrong time could have been fatal."

US Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State John Kerry, delegations from Canada, Germany, Japan and the Netherlands and major donors will meet in Washington DC today at the Iraq Pledging Conference. Funding for vital humanitarian and development work in response to Iraq’s multiple crises has been woefully short so far this year.

Maurizio Crivellaro, Save the Children’s Country Director in Iraq, said: "Any military offensive against ISIS-held areas must include provision of safe passage for civilians and proper planning for the aid response. The system is already overwhelmed with the existing humanitarian fallout from Fallujah and displaced families are living in intolerable conditions in the sweltering summer heat."

"Delegates at today’s critical meeting must urgently prioritise funding for protection and humanitarian response, so that children seeking sanctuary can have their basic needs for food, shelter, education and healthcare met."

There have been several incidents reported in the last few months, including fleeing children being killed by Improvised Explosive Devices on the roadside and of families starving to death as they take roundabout routes to reach safety. In Fallujah, civilians escaping the siege were caught in the crossfire or drowned trying to get across the Euphrates river.

Ahmed*, aged 12, left Mosul with his dad and younger brother last month: "We had to leave other relatives who weren’t strong enough. We walked for nine hours towards the outskirts of the city in a roundabout way, hiding from ISIS. Sometimes we could hear gunfire and the sounds of fighting. We were all very afraid, hiding and then running when we thought the men were distracted."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (July 20, 2016) — Save the Children is urging the Afghan government to end the practice of child marriage after a 14-year-old girl was set alight last week and later died in hospital.

According to media reports, Zahra had already been married for several years and was four months pregnant when she died.

"This is a truly heartbreaking situation in which Zahra faced suffering beyond comprehension," Save the Children Afghanistan Country Director Ana Maria Locsin said.

"Zahra’s is an extreme case of what can happen when a child is forcibly married off, however we know her marriage was not unique — the practice is all too common in many parts of the country."

Afghan Civil Law sets the legal age of marriage at 16 for females, yet 15 percent of Afghan women under 50 years old were married before their 15th birthday. Almost half were married before the age of 18.

"Save the Children is urging the Afghan government to ensure girls like Zahra can stay at home with their families where they belong and where they are protected from harm," Ms Locsin said.

"This is such a fundamental breach of a child’s basic rights. Zahra and so many other children who are married off at a young age are deprived of their right to education, safety and the ability to make choices about their future.

"Zahra’s case must become a catalyst for change so other children won’t fall victim to a similar fate."

Early marriage in Afghanistan is also strongly linked to education outcomes. Young women without an education are more than three times as likely to be married before the age of 18 than are their counterparts who have secondary education or higher.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (July 14, 2016) — Following four days of bloody clashes between rival forces in South Sudan, which has left close to 300 people dead, at least 42,000 displaced and tens of thousands facing critical food and water shortages, the humanitarian situation in Juba is deteriorating despite the implementation of a fragile ceasefire on Monday evening.

Peter Walsh, Save the Children Country Director of South Sudan said: “There are bodies in the streets, shops have been looted, markets closed, people are queueing for food and families are desperately trying to leave the city but without the financial means for bus fares. People are returning to their homes with children who are visibly exhausted after spending nights out in the open with little to eat or drink.”

According to an eyewitness report from a member of Save the Children staff, a ten-month-old baby died in Juba market yesterday as his desperate parents searched for scarce food and medicines.

“It is not known exactly why the child died but the current lack of access to food, water and basic health care is exacerbating already-chronic needs. The staff member who reported this incident himself says his family only has a three-day supply of food left and this is the case for many, many people across the capital,” Walsh said.

More than 13,000 children have been separated from their families in South Sudan since December 2013. The violence that has exploded in Juba over recent days only escalates the chances that many more will have lost their parents or guardians in the unfolding chaos.

“The ceasefire in Juba is being maintained, for now, but there has already been a huge impact on our operations in terms of trying to getting much-needed cash to maintain our programmes in the field. All internal flights have been cancelled and the power has been intermittent for days.”

Save the Children is calling on the national and international community to act now to prevent any further escalation of violence and find a long-term solution to the crisis. The aid agency is also calling on all warring parties in South Sudan to maintain the ceasefire in the interest of protecting all civilians.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Allie Wright 202.794.1823 (M)

Legislation Increases Investment in Maternal and Child Health; Level funds Migration & Refugee Assistance, International Disaster Assistance, Nutrition and Basic Education

 

Washington, D.C. (July 13, 2016) — Save the Children and Save the Children Action Network (SCAN) today applauded the funding levels for maternal and child health, migration & refugee assistance and several other accounts provided by the U.S. House of Representatives Appropriations Committee in its fiscal year (FY) 17 State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs appropriations bill. The Committee approved the bill on July 12th.

The bill increases funding for the Maternal and Child Health account to a total of $997 million, which includes a $275 million contribution to GAVI and $132.5 million for UNICEF. This represents an increase of almost $75 million in core maternal and child health funding, exceeding the President’s FY17 Budget Request, as well as an increase in the U.S. government’s contribution to GAVI by $40 million, putting the U.S. government closer to realizing its pledge of $1 billion over four years.

"We’ve seen preventable child deaths fall by more than half in the past two decades, but there is more work to do," said Mark Shriver, President of SCAN. "The strong support for maternal and child health within this appropriations bill can help bring us that much closer to achieving our shared goal of ending preventable maternal and child deaths around the world."

The bill also provides funding equal to the FY16 enacted levels for Nutrition, Migration & Refugee Assistance, International Disaster Assistance, Food Security and Agriculture (including Feed the Future) and Basic Education accounts.

"The House Appropriations Committee made several important investments for children in its markup of the FY17 State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs bill, including its robust funding for maternal and child health and continued support for other accounts that critically impact children around the world," said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. "However, we are deeply concerned by the funding cap placed on the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program and how this will impact refugee resettlement in the U.S. at a time when there are more than 21 million refugees around the world."

The legislation stipulates that no more than $394.25 million can be spent on the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP).

The Administration has announced plans to resettle 100,000 refugees in the next fiscal year and requested $567.5 million to implement this policy. The unprecedented funding cap set in this bill would reduce funding for refugee resettlement to below FY15 spending levels of $407 million, which served to resettle 70,000 refugees, and drastically below the estimated FY16 spending of $507 million to resettle 85,000 refugees.

Highlights from the legislation include:

• Maternal and Child Health — Increases funding to a total of $997 million and represents an increase of nearly $75 million in core Maternal and Child Health Funding.

• Feed the Future – Provides $1.0006 billion, which is equal to the FY16 enacted level.

• Migration & Refugee Assistance — Provides $3.06 billion, which is equal to the FY16 enacted level.

• International Disaster Assistance — Provides $2.79 billion, which is equal to the FY16 enacted level.

• Nutrition — Provides $125 million for nutrition programs, which is equal to the FY16 enacted level.

• Basic Education — Provides $800 million for basic education programs. This is equal to the FY16 enacted level.

Save the Children’s new global campaign, Every Last Child, is aimed at tackling one of the greatest challenges our generation faces: reducing deaths among excluded children who are the hardest to reach.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Save the Children Action Network is the political voice for kids. We believe that every child deserves the best start in life. That’s why we’re building bipartisan will and voter support to make sure every child in the U.S. has access to high-quality early learning and that no mother or child around the globe dies from a preventable disease or illness. By investing in kids and holding leaders accountable, we are helping kids from birth to age five survive and thrive. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 8, 2016) — More than 4,000 children have been reunited with their families after being split apart by violence and war in South Sudan, since bloody conflict broke out in December 2013.

Many are traumatized having spent months or years without their parents, become displaced from their homes and exposed to violence in the war-torn East African country where British troops have recently deployed as peacekeepers.

Save the Children is now working to reunite the remaining 8,800 separated and unaccompanied children with their families.

This comes as the world’s newest country celebrates its fifth birthday on Saturday, July 9.

Since the onset of the conflict, more than 1.6 million people have been displaced within South Sudan and a more than 700,000 are seeking refuge in neighboring countries such as Ethiopia and Uganda. Most are children.

Peter Walsh, Country Director for Save the Children in South Sudan, said: "A lot of children are separated from their families due to displacement and conflict, many of whom are undertaking long and treacherous journeys across South Sudan alone.

"The conflict has had a devastating impact on the whole population but especially children who are severely distressed due to the violence and trauma they have witnessed first-hand. The situation has placed them at increased risk of violence, abuse, exploitation and recruitment into armed groups. Many are out of school.

"What should be a celebration of another independent year is tainted with tragedy as South Sudan is now facing a double blow of worsening insecurity and an unfolding hunger crisis."

Brutal violence continues to plague the country, where more than 800 schools have been destroyed since December 2013, leaving more than half of children without access to education.

Up to 4.8 million South Sudanese people — more than one-third of the population — are expected to face severe food shortages this month. Many are concerned tensions could bubble over and fighting could start again, thrusting children and their families back into a war zone.

Video of children being reunited with family and other content is available on Save the Children’s Story Central portal.

Spokespeople in South Sudan are available for additional comment. Please contact Erin Taylor, etaylor@savechildren.org, to arrange an interview.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.




$50 Million Raised for 1 Million Beneficiaries across 33 Countries

 

ROME (July 8, 2016) — Bulgari is proudly celebrating its philanthropic, global partnership with Save the Children by launching the new campaign #RAISEYOURHAND.

Lily Aldridge, Matthew Bell, Juliette Binoche, Jamie Bochert, Helena Christensen, Tommy Dunn, Luke Evans, Chiara Ferragni, Toni Garrn, Nolan Gerard Funk, Dorian Grinspan, Johannes Huebl, Jon Kortajarena, Carina Lau, Tali Lennox, Nastia Liukin, Chloe Norgaard, Olivia Palermo, Soo Joo Park, Shu Qi Meg Ryan, Eugenia Silva, Josephine Skriver, Naomi Watts, Kris Wu, and HSH Princess Lilly zu Sayn Wittgenstein Berleburg have agreed to join Bulgari in this new movement, posing for photos and films that will benefit the charity campaign.

Fabrizio Ferri explains the campaign’s #RAISE YOUR HAND slogan, "We raise our hand to signal our presence, our interest, our attention, our participation. To signal that we do not hide, that we have no fear, that we believe we have an answer. Raising our hand while wearing the ring or the bracelet symbolizes our support for Bulgari’s effort to raise funds for Save the Children. I have personally witnessed the positive impact it has had on the lives of thousands of children around the world, thanks to the money raised so far. That’s why I donate my work. This is how I raise my hand."

The Perfect Complement to the Campaign

The example par excellence of Bulgari’s commitment to Save the Children is its new sterling silver and black ceramic bracelet, specially created for the campaign, providing a beautiful addition to the Save the Children jewelry collection. Bearing the Save the Children logo, the stunning bracelet perfectly complements the emblematic line. Comprised originally of a ring and a pendant, each piece of the Save the Children collection is inspired by Bulgari’s iconic B.zero1 jewelry design.

Available in Bulgari stores worldwide, select department stores, and on Bulgari’s website (in the US and Japan), the bracelet retails for $510, of $100 is donated directly to Save the Children.

$50 Million has Reached 1 Million

In 2016 their partnership is strengthened by a new bespoke initiative, one that empowers youth to enhance their "soft skills," build upon their capacities, and improve their economic conditions as they pursue their own journeys, from deprivation to success.

To date, the wildly successful sales of the custom-designed Bulgari collection has helped to raise $50 million for Save the Children. These important donations have reached 1 million beneficiaries in 33 countries across five continents, in areas where natural disasters, wars, conflict, marginalization, disability and poverty can hinder the right to education and a better future.

Over 7 years, Bulgari and Save the Children have had an active presence in more than 2,000 schools, providing improvements to services and infrastructures, and training teachers to use child-centered, more interactive teaching methods.

Focusing on Youth Empowerment

Through the #RAISEYOURHAND campaign, Bulgari and Save the Children’s partnership is able to put a special focus on youth empowerment, as it is the best investment to pursue a prosperous, healthy, and more just society.

Bulgari is investing in the future of hundreds of thousands of children worldwide, giving them the opportunity to be what children deserve to be, and aspire to become. Its work can help children to make informed choices, empowering them to form their own healthy foundations that will be the basis of our society of tomorrow.

Jean-Christophe Babin, CEO of Bulgari, adds, "Save the Children is one of the most effective, wide-reaching charities in the world, and we are proud to work alongside them in their cause. Children are a key component in the fight against poverty, because as much as they are vulnerable they also harbor so much potential. It is by providing assistance and education to a growing youth that we can make a difference in the whole rest of their lives. Bettering the world is a quality inborn in Bulgari’s company culture. We are proud to partner with Save the Children to do our part in making a better tomorrow."

Claudio Tesauro, Save the Children Italy’s President, added: "Being able to continue the journey that we started 7 years ago with Bulgari is a source of great pride for Save the Children, and we are certain that the #RAISE YOUR HAND call-to-action will give new momentum to this partnership. In line with the campaign’s creative concept developed by Fabrizio Ferri, Bulgari and Save the Children have raised their hands to signify that many lives can be changed — those of the children living in the most deprived areas of the world, those of many young people who could find their life path if given the opportunity to cultivate their talents. A great many people are allowing this partnership to make a difference in the lives of so many children among the most vulnerable in the world, giving them the future they deserve."

About Bulgari’s Save The Children Jewelry Collection

Too many children are unable to attain their aspirations, as the lack of education perpetuates the cycle of poverty. In 2009, Bulgari decided to take action on behalf of disadvantaged children around the world by partnering with Save the Children. It launched a campaign of unprecedented ambition and scope, from which a considerable portion of the proceeds from the sale of Save the Children jewelry — custom-designed by Bulgari — are donated to the charity.

About Bulgari

Part of the LVMH Group, Bulgari was originally founded in Rome in 1884 as a jewelry shop. Quickly establishing a reputation for Italian excellence, Bulgari has since become renowned for exquisite craftsmanship and magnificent jewelry creations. The company’s international success has evolved it into a global and diversified purveyor of luxury products and services, ranging from fine jewels and watches to accessories and perfumes, and featuring an unrivalled network of boutiques and hotels in the world’s most exclusive shopping areas.

About Save the Children

Save the Children believes every child deserves a future. In 120 countries around the world, we work every day to give children a healthy start in life, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. When crisis strikes, and children are most vulnerable, we are always among the first to respond and the last to leave. We ensure children’s unique needs are met and their voices are heard. We deliver lasting results for millions of children, including those hardest to reach.

We do whatever it takes for children — every day and in times of crisis — transforming their lives and the future we share. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

 



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 8, 2016) — As China awaits the imminent arrival of Typhoon Nepartak, Save the Children has confirmed it will launch an emergency response in flood and typhoon affected parts of the country.

Packing winds of up to 150 mph, the category four storm ripped through Taiwan on Friday morning and is now preparing to bring intense rainfall to large portions of eastern China.

China is already battling its worst flooding in more than a decade, withat least 39millionpeople currently impacted across 14provinces, mainly in the southeast.

Typhoon Nepartak is expected to bring heavy rainfall in the next 24 hours, exacerbating an already critical situation.

“This is a double disaster here in China, with devastating flooding compounded by a super storm,” said Save the Children’s Acting Country Director in China, Wang Le.

“I’m particularly worried about the impact the storm and flooding will have on children, who are so vulnerable in emergencies like this.Save the Children stands ready to respond and we will be doing all we can to help those affected.”

Meanwhile the scale of destruction caused by Typhoon Nepartak in Taiwan is beginning to emerge, with cars tipped over and roofs ripped off buildings. Three deaths and over one hundred injuries have been reported.

Save the Children will begin carrying out assessments in flood and typhoon affected parts of China as soon as it is safe to do so, and will plan an emergency response to meet the urgent survival needs of affected families – especially children.

The aid agency has been working in China since the early 1980s including in child protection, education and health.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Jennifer Garner

Save the Children is partnering with West Virginia native and Save the Children Trustee Jennifer Garner on a T-shirt campaign with charitable giving platform Omaze to aid flood-affected children and families in her home state. Omaze photo.

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 7, 2016) – Following devastating flooding in West Virginia, Save the Children announced today that it is partnering with actor Jennifer Garner, a Save the Children Trustee and a native of West Virginia, on a T-shirt campaign with Omaze, a charitable giving platform. Thirty percent of the retail price from each exclusive "West Virginia Strong" T-shirt will aid flood-affected children and families who Save the Children serves, and those in their community areas. Save the Children has been working in West Virginia for years and with the help of funds raised from this T-shirt campaign, is committed to continuing to make an impact for kids in this critical time.

Children and families in West Virginia have lost homes, vehicles, and in many areas, children’s education has been disrupted, as the floods have damaged resources and closed schools. In response to the deadly storms, Garner was inspired to help her home state and those whose lives have been turned upside down. "No matter where you’re from, you can stand West Virginia strong with me," said Garner. "West Virginia’s children are near and dear to my heart. Let’s join forces to support these children and families and show compassion and love in this time of need. Together, we can make a difference."

Created to raise funds and awareness for Save the Children’s recovery efforts in West Virginia, shirts will be on sale at www.omaze.com/wvstrong for $25 beginning today through July 26. The T-shirt aptly features mountains, as West Virginia’s official state nickname is "The Mountain State."

Jennifer Garner, Save the Children and Omaze invite supporters and influencers to get involved, take a photo in the shirt and spread the campaign on social media using #WVStrong.

About Save the Children

Save the Children believes every child deserves a future. In 120 countries around the world, we work every day to give children a healthy start in life, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. When crisis strikes, and children are most vulnerable, we are always among the first to respond and the last to leave. We ensure children’s unique needs are met and their voices are heard. We deliver lasting results for millions of children, including those hardest to reach.

We do whatever it takes for children – every day and in times of crisis – transforming their lives and the future we share. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

 

About Omaze

Omaze is an experience-driven fundraising platform that leverages the power of storytelling and technology to radically change charitable giving. Since launching in 2012, Omaze has impacted more than 125 charities and received donations from over 175 countries.



Two Years of Drought Response in Ethiopia
Download the Report

Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 7, 2016) – As the impact of Ethiopia's worst drought in 50 years peaks over the next three months when the traditional "lean season" takes hold, the response of the international community will be critical, Save the Children is warning.

An estimated 10.2 million people, including more than 5.75 million children, will remain reliant on emergency food assistance until the main November harvest.

While much has been done to help those most at risk, Save the Children's Country Director John Graham has urged donors to "finish the job we started."

"Although the onset of Kiremt summer rains is a welcome relief, many families are already severely weakened, both physically and economically, by the devastating cycle of failed harvests," says Graham.

"How we respond over the next three months is absolutely critical to ensure that the collaborative work channeled into averting a major food crisis doesn't fall down at the final hurdle.

"The second half of 2016 really is the most crucial period of this entire response, after which we will know whether the collective humanitarian effort was adequate, or whether there were risky shortfalls in resource allocation and community support, particularly for the most vulnerable."

As the impact of last year's failed harvests and many months surviving on food aid intensifies over the coming weeks and months, Graham warns that the caseload of severe acute malnutrition and moderate acute malnutrition cases is on track to spike in August.

"In the first three months of 2016 alone, there were 108,000 recorded cases of children suffering from severe acute malnutrition, and we know from speaking to staff in our medical clinics that this upsurge is set to continue throughout the summer months.

"We have come so far, we can't fail now – we have to make the finish line," he adds.

In a new Save the Children report, Two Years of Drought Response in Ethiopia, Graham reiterates that two years on from the start of the food crisis, the El Nino-related drought is still affecting children and their families in many ways including food insecurity and malnutrition, water shortages, and the severe disruption of education for more than one million children.

"Help is still urgently needed to support the government over the coming months of scarcity and beyond. Even after the situation stabilizes, it will take two or three years for families and communities to fully recover, and even longer to continue making improvements," says Graham.

"More than $5.5 million has been raised by the public for Save the Children in Ethiopia, which is a staggering amount and has certainly helped to save lives, but we are still appealing to donors and the international community for $2 million in funding to help us to finish the job we started.

"We recently began a large-scale seed distribution scheme, mainly in the severely drought-hit areas of Amhara, Tigray, Southern Nations Regions and Oromia, in an attempt to help 76,000 households reduce their dependency on emergency food aid and humanitarian interventions," Graham explains.

"We are also implementing 'cash for work' programs, supporting families who have lost their livestock, implementing food distributions and water trucking, as well as training community-based health workers to treat malnutrition and intervening to save livestock and crops where possible."

Spokespeople in Ethiopia are available for additional comment. Please contact Erin Taylor to schedule an interview.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Save Save Save Save


Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (July 7, 2016) — Taiwan and China are bracing for the first typhoon to make landfall in the northwestern Pacific Ocean in almost 200 days — "super" typhoon Nepartak, carrying sustained winds of more than 160 mph.

The category five storm is expected to reach Taiwan late on Thursday night, or Friday morning before hitting parts of China's southeast — many of which are already battling devastating floods.

Save the Children stands ready to respond if required.

"Typhoon Nepartak could affect a significant number of people in Fujian and Zhejiang provinces, as well as Shanghai, some of which have already been affected by heavy rainfall in recent weeks," Acting Country Director for Save the Children in China, Wang Le said.

Save the Children has been working in China since the early 1980s including in child protection, education and health.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Allie Wright 202.794.1823 (M)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 6, 2016) — Save the Children and Save the Children Action Network today celebrate the final passage of the bipartisan Global Food Security Act of 2016 (S.1252) by the House of Representatives. The bill is the result of years of dedicated bipartisan efforts by many global food security and nutrition champions, including Representatives Chris Smith (R-NJ), Betty McCollum (D-MN), Chairman Ed Royce (R-CA), Senators Johnny Isakson (R-GA), Robert P. Casey Jr. (D-PA), and Chair Bob Corker (R-TN).

"Passage of the Global Food Security Act is a major victory toward breaking the intergenerational cycles of poverty for the millions of children affected by hunger and malnutrition worldwide," said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. "The bill rightly puts women and children at the center of development and positions nutrition as a critical bridge between agriculture and health."

"Every year, 5.9 million children die from preventable causes, nearly half of them due to malnutrition," said Mark Shriver, president of Save the Children Action Network. "This bill will change this by improving nutrition and food security. It will save the lives of millions of children around the world suffering from poverty, hunger and malnutrition."

Expected soon to be signed into law, the bill institutionalizes President Obama’s global hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future, and ensures continued U.S. leadership in achieving the global goals to end poverty, global hunger and malnutrition, and preventable child and maternal deaths, by 2030.

The Global Food Security Act requires the President produce a whole-of-government Global Food Security Strategy with measurable goals and benchmarks, in consultation with 11 Federal agencies, by October 1, 2016. It also authorizes $1 billion to implement the Strategy and another nearly $2.8 billion to address the humanitarian food and other needs of refugees and others around the world impacted by crises and conflict.

"The focus of this bill on helping vulnerable populations and refugees closely aligns with Save the Children’s new global campaign — Every Last Child — that is aimed at tackling one of the greatest challenges our generation faces: ending preventable child deaths and making sure that we’re starting with those hardest to reach," said Miles.

The Act requires integrating the recently-released U.S. Government Global Nutrition Coordination Plan, which alongside the USAID Nutrition Strategy, provides a platform to accelerate progress in reducing child malnutrition and ending preventable child and maternal deaths.

"We have worked extremely hard over the last few years to see this bill come to fruition," said Shriver. "Now the real work begins to ensure it helps us fight poverty in a way that makes sure we reach every last child."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Save the Children Action Network is the political voice for kids. We believe that every child deserves the best start in life. That’s why we’re building bipartisan will and voter support to make sure every child in the U.S. has access to high-quality early learning and that no mother or child around the globe dies from a preventable disease or illness. By investing in kids and holding leaders accountable, we are helping kids from birth to age five survive and thrive. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (July 6, 2016) — The bipartisan Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act of 2015 (H.R. 3766) unanimously passed the House of Representatives last night, following unanimous passage by the Senate last week.The bill will now head to President Obama for his signature.

Save the Children thanks bill sponsors Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Ben Cardin (D-MD) and Representatives Ted Poe (R-TX) and Gerry Connolly (D-VA) for their committed leadership to increase the accountability of U.S. foreign assistance resources.This important legislation will require that detailed foreign assistance information be regularly updated on the ForeignAssistance.gov website.It also requires that development and economic assistance be rigorously monitored and evaluated.

“As the United States faces an ever-growing number of humanitarian and development challenges around the world, effective U.S. foreign assistance is more important than ever.Recognizing that our resources are limited, we must be doing all that we can to use them most effectively so that they can have the most impact on those in need around the world,” said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children President and CEO and Co-Chair of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network.

Access to clear and detailed information about aid projects that is compatible with international standards enables people living in developing and donor countries to hold their governments accountable for development outcomes.The U.S. government has taken significant steps in the right direction in recent years, launching the foreignassistance.gov website and committing to increased transparency with other global donors.Enacting this legislation ensures that this progress can be built upon when a new administration and Congress are sworn in next year.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future.

Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children, serves as co-chair of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network, a reform coalition composed of international development practitioners and experts as well as concerned citizens and private sector organizations. MFAN works to make U.S foreign assistance more effective and transparent.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



West Virginia Floods

Support Our West Virginia Floods Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact:
Erin Taylor

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (July 1, 2016) – Save the Children continues to provide much-needed assistance to children and families severely impacted by the historic floods that hit West Virginia last week. A rapid response team is providing blankets, pop-up cribs and car seats to families in and around the communities where Save the Children has long offered educational and health programing, including Nicholas, Roane, Calhoun, and Kanawha counties.

Today, county music superstar Brad Paisley, along with West Virginia Senators Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito, toured the hard-hit town of Clendenin.Along with Save the Children they toured the town’s Herbert Hoover high school, which was under as much as 10 feet of water during the height of the storms. “My thoughts and prayers are with the people in my home state of West Virginia,” Paisley said. “The towns and schools we’ve visited today have been devastated by these floods. I pledge to do all I can to help my fellow West Virginians and have set up a GoFundMe account so others can join me.”

“The scale of the destruction is hard to put into words, but the people of West Virginia are strong and I am confident that we will rebuild,” Senator Manchin said. “I am grateful to Save the Children for their long-term work helping our children succeed in school and for being on the front-lines today, helping vulnerable children and families in the wake of such terrible flooding.”

Anna Hardaway, Save the Children’s West Virginia State Director said of their visit: “We have seen entire towns destroyed and children without basic necessities such as clothing, diapers and cribs,” said. “We will continue to provide emergency items and do all we can to make sure that children, teachers and districts have what they need to start school in August.”

In a new video message, actor Jennifer Garner, a Save the Children Trustee and a native of West Virginia, is also continuing her support of flood victims: “In my home state of West Virginia, children have lost everything—their homes and even loved ones,” Garner said. “Save the Children’s caring experts work in these disadvantaged communities every day. They know these families, and right now these children are especially vulnerable.”

Save the Children currently partners with local schools to serve nearly 2,000 children in the state. Programs support mothers during pregnancy, provide home visits to families of infants and toddlers, and help young children get ready for school, stay healthy and succeed in school and beyond.

To donate to Save the Children’s West Virginia flood response, visit: SavetheChildren.org/WestVirginia

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Save


Urges Final Consideration by the House

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (June 30, 2016) — The bipartisan Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act of 2015 (H.R. 3766) is one step closer to becoming law after the Senate unanimously approved passage late Tuesday night.

Save the Children thanks bill sponsors Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Ben Cardin (D-MD) and Representatives Ted Poe (R-TX) and Gerry Connolly (D-VA) for their leadership and persistence in getting the bill to this point as well as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) for their support of this important legislation. We urge the House of Representatives to move quickly to pass the bill before the legislative session ends so that it can be sent to the President for his signature.

"The U.S. is facing an unprecedented number of humanitarian and development challenges around the world today. Efforts to ensure that our limited foreign assistance is being spent effectively, such as the Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act, must be prioritized," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children President and CEO and Co-Chair of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network.

Access to clear and detailed information about aid projects that is compatible with international standards enables people living in developing and donor countries to hold their governments accountable for development outcomes. The U.S. government has taken significant steps in the right direction in recent years, launching the foreignassistance.gov website and committing to increased transparency with other global donors. Final passage of the Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act into law will help to ensure that this progress continues.

Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children, serves as co-chair of the Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network, a reform coalition composed of international development practitioners and experts as well as concerned citizens and private sector organizations. MFAN works to make U.S foreign assistance more effective and transparent.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact:
Media@savechildren.org

WASHINGTON, DC (June 30, 2016) — 4.8 million people in South Sudan – more than a third of the country’s population – will face severe food shortages over the coming months, amid a looming hunger crisis threatening large parts of the country, Save the Children warns today.

The Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) update released today by the Government of South Sudan, agencies and humanitarian partners, projects that 4.8 million people will be in need of urgent food and nutrition assistance in July, up half a million from 4.3 million in April.

“This is the highest level of hunger the country has seen since the onset of conflict in December 2013. We have witnessed a more than three-fold increase in the number of severely malnourished children being admitted to our Out Patient Therapeutic (OPT) feeding programs,” warns Peter Walsh, Save the Children’s Country Director in South Sudan.

“The spreading of conflict to areas that were peaceful even during the height of the conflict, coupled with a delayed rainy season, rising food prices, impassable roads and dysfunctional markets are all preventing families from accessing food and causing immense suffering for the people of South Sudan.”

Escalating food insecurity and conflict are also forcing many families over the borders into neighboring countries.

“In the last few months alone, an estimated 100,000 South Sudanese people have crossed into Sudan, Kenya, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, with the number set to increase to more than 150,000 by the beginning of July,” said Walsh.

“What we are seeing right now is a grim sign of what is to come in the next few months. If the funding to avert hunger in South Sudan is not prioritized, hunger will become a death sentence for children in the world’s youngest nation, a situation completely unacceptable on our watch.” Mr. Walsh has warned.

Save the Children currently supports the highest number of OPTs in the country. With the spike in the sheer number of malnutrition cases among children, pregnant and lactating mothers, there is dire need to further scale-up in areas that have not yet been reached due to challenges in resources and access constraints.

Save the Children invests in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. In the United States and around the world, we give children a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



West Virginia Floods

Support Our West Virginia Floods Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact:
Erin Taylor

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (June 28, 2016) – Following historic flooding that hit West Virginia last Thursday and Friday, Save the Children is helping families and communities assess damages and meet immediate needs. The organization has been working in the state for decades and runs programs to help children in three of the flood-affected counties, including Roane County, Calhoun County and Nicholas County.

Save the Children has been reaching out to the families of the hundreds of children who participate in its programs in West Virginia, but telephone and power outages has made it difficult. “We are very concerned that we still have only made contact with about half of the families in our programs,” said Save the Children’s West Virginia Director, Anna Hardway. Families have lost homes, vehicles and belongings in the devastating floods that have spread across 44 counties throughout the state. “Parents are telling us their children have lost their shoes and are walking barefoot in contaminated waters, and traveling in vehicles without car seats, because their own cars were washed away,” said Hardway.

Actor Jennifer Garner, a Save the Children Trustee and a native of West Virginia, is calling for support: “My heart is breaking for beautiful West Virginia—more than a quarter of children there already face the challenges that come with living in poverty,” said Garner. “The people of my home state are the most resilient you will find, but the damage caused by the storm and deadly floods has been catastrophic for these families and communities. I am relieved to know that Save the Children will continue to be on the ground in West Virginia throughout the cleanup and recovery, to make sure basic needs are met and services that families depend on most, including schools and afterschool programs, are restored. Let’s help Save the Children do what it does best.”

Save the Children serves families in five West Virginia counties through health, early education programs and afterschool programs. “We’ve worked in these communities for years, and this level of damage and loss is unprecedented,” said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children President and CEO.

The organization currently partners with local schools to help nearly 2,000 children in the state. Programs support mothers during pregnancy, provide home visits to families of infants and toddlers, help young children get ready for school, stay healthy and succeed in school and beyond.

To donate to Save the Children’s West Virginia flood response, visit: SavetheChildren.org/WestVirginia

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Support Our West Virginia Floods Children's Relief Fund

Media Contact:
Media@savechildren.org

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (June 24, 2016) – Save the Children is assessing how best to help the thousands of children impacted by the powerful storms that hit West Virginia on Thursday night, causing widespread flooding and destruction, power outages and the deaths of at least 14 people, including two young children. The National Weather Service said 8-10 inches of rain fell in 6-8 hours in parts of the state. West Virginian Governor Earl Ray Tomblin has issued a state of emergency in 44 of the state's 55 counties. Save the Children works in three of the flood-affected counties, including Roane County, Calhoun County and Cherry River in Nicholas County.

"We are reaching out to all the families we serve to determine what the most urgent needs are to protect children's safety and wellbeing," said Anna Hardway, Save the Children's director of Programs in West Virginia. "We know many children are displaced and have lost belongings and possibly homes, and can be very vulnerable after a disaster like this. Many of the families we serve don't have the resources to quickly bounce back and we want to make sure we can help them protect their children."

Save the Children serves children in 5 West Virginia counties through health, early education programs and afterschool programs. The organization currently partners with local schools to deliver programing to 1,824 children in the state. Programs support mothers during pregnancy, provides home visits to families of infants and toddlers, help young children get ready for school, stay healthy and succeed in school and beyond.

Save the Children has worked in West Virginia since 2010 and has served more than 1 million U.S. children affected by disaster since Hurricane Katrina struck in 2006.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Every day, children around the world are severely affected by crises and events which are out of their control. No one knows when, or where, the next crisis will occur. For nearly 100 years, Save the Children has been on the front lines of emergency and humanitarian responses around the world. Our Children’s Emergency Fund was established to provide assistance to children in their time of greatest need.

Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Washington, DC (June 22, 2016) — Iraq faces a humanitarian crisis this summer on a massive scale, with hundreds of thousands more people expected to flee besieged cities as escape routes open up, Save the Children is warning.

Already this month, 80,000 people have left the city of Fallujah, with another 70,000 expected to leave in the coming days and weeks. A Save the Children assessment team in Anbar, Iraq says more than half of those fleeing are children — and many are now living in makeshift camps without even a sheet to shelter under as temperatures soar above 104°F every day.

The current crisis in Fallujah is expected to be only the start of a much bigger emergency. In the north of Iraq, an estimated 300,000 children are likely to flee Mosul and the surrounding areas in the event of an offensive on the city. Already, families who can escape are doing so, in incredibly dangerous circumstances.

Children who have arrived from Mosul to the Kurdistan Region of Iraq in the last few weeks are being supported by Save the Children staff. One pair of young brothers said they ran barefoot through the outskirts of the city to the frontline with their father, leaving behind their mother who was too heavily pregnant to run but begged the boys to go. Another mother said she and her children were dodging bullets as they escaped.

Maurizio Crivellaro, Save the Children Country Director in Iraq, said: "We can expect to see the awful scenes we are witnessing in Fallujah repeated on a much larger scale if, as is expected, there is a military offensive on Mosul. Tens of thousands of children are already crammed in overcrowded camps in the searing summer heat. If and when there is another influx of displaced families from Mosul, the situation could be catastrophic."

With the UN's Iraq appeal for this year only 33 percent funded, humanitarian organizations are struggling to meet even the basic needs of families, including those who have been living in a state of extreme deprivation for more than two years under siege. There are already 3.5 million internally displaced people in Iraq, alongside 250,000 Syrian refugees, and the services to support them are overwhelmed.

Mr. Crivellaro said: "The international community cannot ignore the tragedy that is unfolding in Iraq. To stop this from spiraling out of control, funding and support need to be put in place to help the Iraqi authorities and humanitarian agencies cope with the scale of the crisis. Otherwise, we're facing a situation where young children are escaping the terror of life under siege only to find themselves at risk of hunger, disease and exposure in supposedly safe areas."

Save the Children is working in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, as well as the north, west and center of Iraq, with families who have been displaced by the ongoing conflict. We distribute food parcels and vouchers, hygiene kits and clean water, run school catch up classes and make sure the most vulnerable children are protected.

For more information or interviews, please contact Media@savechildren.org

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Erin Taylor 267.250.8829 (M)

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (June 20, 2016) — Today, on World Refugee Day, Carolyn Miles, Save the Children's President and CEO, released the following statement:

"A record 65 million people around the world have had to forcibly leave their homes, and the need to help refugees has never been greater. Too often, refugees are thought of in the abstract. Today, on World Refugee Day, it is critical to remember that refugees are people like you and me, and deserve the same rights, protections and respect."

"We are heartbroken and horrified by reports that as many as 11 people, including three children, who risked everything to escape war in Syria, were shot and killed this weekend as they tried to cross the border into Turkey to find safety. We need to do everything we can to help and protect people who are fleeing war and persecution. Rather than close our borders and turn our backs, we need to welcome them and offer support—just as we would want done for us."

"More than half of the world's refugees are under the age of 18. They have had their childhoods interrupted, and half of all refugee children are out of school. Save the Children calls on the international community to ensure that every refugee child has access to education and is learning. No refugee child should be without education for more than one month after being displaced."

"Education sets children up for success, provides hope and opportunities for the future, as well as a sense of stability and normalcy for those who are overcoming traumatic events. It also prepares children with the skills needed to rebuild and help develop their home countries if and when they return."

"We need negotiated political solutions to the multiple conflicts forcing families to flee their homes, from Syria to South Sudan. But for the child who is 10 years old, the dream is simply safety for her family and to attend school. World leaders, aid organizations and private corporations who care about our future can and must do more to make that dream a reality."

Save the Children experts are available for additional comment.

Please contact Erin Taylor to schedule an interview.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (June 17, 2016) — Save the Children said: "Reports that 34 people, 20 of them children, have been found dead in the Sahara desert, is yet another tragic example of lives lost along the refugee and migrant route."

"The majority of children who make it to Italy reported harrowing and severely abusive journeys when interviewed by Save the Children. At the mercy of people smugglers and traffickers, they continue to face grave risks on their way to reach safety. We have heard of the horrors children face; many suffer appalling torture, abuse and exploitation as they make their way through sub-Saharan Africa on to Libya."

The criminals that transport desperate families will continue to flourish as long as there are no safe and legal alternatives.

"International leaders are pulling up the drawbridge and prioritizing border control over saving lives. We must not rip up the moral rule book. If they continue the current course of inaction, we will continue to see children dying of thirst in the summer heat in the desert or drowning at sea, as they try to seek a better life."

Ismail* from Somalia, 17 years old, told Save the Children in Italy: "We all got onto a truck, we were about 30 people, seven of us women, all Somali and in six days we arrived in the desert."

"In the desert the traffickers took the women, and raped them. One of these was a woman who was seven months pregnant. We tried to stop them but they threatened us with arms. The woman who was pregnant, when she came back to the group took a scarf and tried to strangle herself but luckily we stopped her."

"We tried to calm her, telling her that what had happened wasn't her fault. We started driving again. The driver forced one of the women to sit next to him, without clothes, to do to him what he wanted. One of them told us 'Welcome to Hell.'"

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Fun, New PSA Shows Parents how ICE Cards Protect Children In Case of Emergency

Media Contact
Jeremy Soulliere 203.295.5842 (M)


FAIRFIELD, Conn. (June 15, 2016) – In a new animated PSA, launched today by Save the Children and 20th Century Fox, the beloved Ice Age: Collision Course herd shows how ICE contact cards can keep families together.

The PSA encourages parents to create ICE (In Case of Emergency) cards for their children, so families can quickly reunite after a disaster. Easy to fill out at SavetheChildren.org/ICE, families can print ICE cards at home and put one copy in their child’s bag and keep another copy for themselves. The cards include contact and identification information that can be critical during emergencies, and for a limited time, families can select a custom ICE card featuring Scrat and his elusive acorn from the new animated film Ice Age: Collision Course, in theaters everywhere July 22.

Each day, 69 million U.S. children are separated from their parents while they're at school or child care, but many families are ill-prepared to reunite quickly. A recent poll by the National Center for Disaster Preparedness, Columbia University, showed that 41 percent of American families don't know where their child would be evacuated to in case of emergency.

"It can be very scary for a child and parent to be separated if there’s a flood, a tornado or any kind of emergency. But families can take a simple step now – by creating an In-Case-of-Emergency, or ICE, contact card – and get better prepared to quickly reunite," said Bill Corwin, Save the Children’s vice president of U.S. Programs. "Save the Children is excited to team up with 20th Century Fox, Scrat and the entire Ice Age herd to help keep children safe in times of crisis."

"Our Ice Age: Collision Course herd is the perfect gang to help show kids how to stay safe under any condition," said Zachary Eller, Senior Vice President, Marketing Partnerships, 20th Century Fox. "We’re proud to partner with Save the Children on such a worthy cause."

In Ice Age: Collision Course, Scrat’s epic pursuit of the elusive acorn catapults him into the universe where he accidentally sets off a series of cosmic events that transform and threaten the Ice Age World. To save themselves, Sid, Manny, Diego, and the rest of the herd must leave their home and embark on a quest full of comedy and adventure, traveling to exotic new lands and encountering a host of colorful new characters. The film stars Ray Romano, John Leguizamo, Denis Leary, Seann William Scott, Josh Peck, Simon Pegg, Keke Palmer, Jennifer Lopez, Queen Latifah, Adam Devine, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Max Greenfield, Jessie J, Nick Offerman, Wanda Sykes, Stephanie Beatriz, Michael Strahan, Melissa Rauch, and Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Making an ICE card at SavetheChildren.org/ICE is one of three important "prep steps" Save the Children recommends families take to protect children during emergencies. Learn more at SavetheChildren.org/GetReady.

About Save the Children

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

About Twentieth Century Fox

One of the world’s largest producers and distributors of motion pictures, 20th Century Fox produces, acquires and distributes motion pictures throughout the world. These motion pictures are produced or acquired by the following units of 20th Century Fox Film: Twentieth Century Fox, Fox 2000 Pictures, Fox Searchlight Pictures, Fox International Productions, and Twentieth Century Fox Animation.



The limited edition "Love" shoe from TOD’S collaboration with Gabriela Hearst. Twenty percent of all proceeds from the sale of the shoes will support Save the Children, which is helping children learn, stay healthy and be protected from harm. Photo courtesy of TOD’S.

Media Contact
media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (June 7, 2016) — TOD’S and Gabriela Hearst are launching a limited edition “Love” shoe in June 2016, with 20 percent of all proceeds going to Save the Children. The “Love” slip-on shoes feature a Morse code trim that reads love, initially developed for the Gabriela Hearst Fall 2016 collection.

“We’re pleased to collaborate with Gabriela Hearst and Save the Children on this philanthropic product,” said Claudio Castiglioni, General Brand Manager of TOD’S. “TOD’S is a company that believes in charity and giving back and how nice to do it with our most popular sneaker reimagined with a special twist by Gabriela Hearst.”

Gabriela fell in love with TOD’S slip-on shoes many years ago when she bought her first pair. “I love pairing them with my suits for work— the classic style is so sleek and cool,” says Hearst, “It’s perfect for my life on the go.”

Inspired and motivated by Save the Children’s groundbreaking work to create a better future for children, Gabriela turned to TOD’S to create a special product to help achieve this goal. “The collaboration is a project out of desire and love so it only felt natural that we give back,” Hearst explains, “Save the Children is an organization that TOD’S and I feel close to and it is an exceptional organization that through its advocacy and programming provides children with opportunities to thrive.”

“Save the Children is delighted to partner with TOD’S and Gabriela Hearst on the “Love” shoes. We are inspired by Gabriela’s shared passion for fashion and philanthropy, which led her to design this special shoe to give a brighter tomorrow to disadvantaged children,” said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. “We hope the limited edition shoes will become the must-have style for the summer.”

Made in Italy, the “Love” shoe has a men’s brogue detail and is available in smooth calf leather in black, navy, and white and metal textured leather in Silver with contrasting trim, handcrafted woven rope trim and rubber outsole with embossed pebbles.

Twenty percent of all proceeds from the sale of the TOD’S and Gabriela Hearst shoes will support Save the Children, which works in communities in 120 countries, including the United States. The funds raised will go to helping children in need learn, stay healthy and be protected from harm.

Hearst also coordinated a photo essay project with Peruvian photographer Hans Neumann to spotlight the new slip-on shoe, which features Save the Children Artist Ambassador Dakota Fanning, Lauren Hutton, Miroslava Duma, Lindsey Adelman, Save the Children donor Dorrit Morley and Save the Children staff member Zaineb Malick all wearing the shoes.

The TOD’S and Gabriela Hearst “Love” shoes retails for $645 and will be available from June 2016 exclusively at TOD’S stores nationwide and www.tods.com.

About TOD’S

TOD’S is the story of three generations of style and good taste, beginning in early 1900 as a small shoe factory started by Diego Della Valle’s grandfather, Filippo, in Casette D’Ete (Ascoli Piceno). In the 1970s, Diego Della Valle expanded his family’s business and retained the handmade manufacturing process—producing high-quality shoes and leather goods with styles that have become icons of modern living.

TOD’S first received worldwide recognition in late 1970 with the creation of the “Gommini” driving shoe, identified by 133 pebbles on the sole. The introduction of the TOD’S handbag collection in 1997 reflected the spirit, quality and design of the TOD’S shoe collection and catapulted the brand into what is now known as one of the most successful companies in the world of luxury accessories.

All TOD’S products are entirely hand-crafted in Italy with highly skilled techniques—a peculiarity that distinguishes the brand and attracts customers who appreciate true Italian craftsmanship.

About Gabriela Hearst

Launched in February 2015, the impeccably constructed collection draws inspiration from the designer’s equestrian roots in Uruguay. Gabriela wanted to create a brand that reflects a slower pace and process: where things are made with care and detail, where tradition is more important than trend, where there is a purpose to every piece. Tailored pieces are made by local seamstresses in Italy while the knits are made in partnership with a women’s non-profit, Manos del Uruguay, made by local craftswomen with yarn from Gabriela’s ranch. Gabriela Hearst is a U.S. womenswear nominee for the 2016 International Woolmark Prize.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, Conn. (May 16, 2016) — At least 3.5 million refugee children around the world are currently out of school, leaving them increasingly vulnerable to discrimination and potential abuse, as well as exploitation by traffickers, or the pressure of entering into early marriage.

Refugee children are five times less likely to attend school than other children. Currently, 50 percent of primary school-aged refugee children and 75 percent of secondary school-aged children are completely left out of the education system, with none of the safeguards that school environments provide. In 2015 alone, the education of 80 million children was disrupted by humanitarian crises.

"It's horrible that children are being denied the chance of a decent future because they are out of school. Without an education, these children face a bleak future. They are more likely to undertake perilous journeys to Europe and other parts of the world, and are also more likely to be married early, exploited, trafficked, and forced into work," says Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children.

"This is why, at the first ever World Humanitarian Summit, we are calling for no refugee child to be out of school for more than 30 days after being displaced. The average length of time spent living as a refugee is now 17 years, meaning that millions of children and young people will miss out on some — if not all — of their education, severely diminishing their future opportunities, and those of their families and communities," she adds.

"Education sets children up for success and provides refugee children with hope for the future in the places they are currently living as well as providing a sense of stability and normalcy for children who have lived through traumatic and stressful events. It also prepares children to learn the basic skills needed to rebuild and develop their countries if and when they return."

Key barriers to education include financial and language issues; the need for many children to work informally to help support their families; lengthy bureaucratic processes and lack of documentation; limited school places; and the fact that developing countries host 86 percent of the world's refugees and yet have the least capacity to cope with refugees and their complex short- and long-term needs.

The inaugural World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul on May 23rd and 24th is a significant opportunity to change the narrative on displacement and show compassion for some of the world's most deprived children, according to Save the Children.

"Education in emergency situations and protracted crises (EiE) is chronically underfunded by an estimated $4.8 billion at present, and we simply won't achieve the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) unless we all work together to tackle the barriers that prevent millions of refugee children from getting a quality basic education, much less stay true to the global pledge to 'leave no one behind'," says Miles.

"At the Summit and beyond, we are asking donors and member states to provide better financial, legal, and political support for host-country governments to make sure that child refugees in their countries are in school and learning. This includes ensuring that all out-of-school refugee children have the opportunity to education, scaling up quality basic education for refugee children, and expanding early childhood care and education opportunities for refugees.

"Host countries have a role to play too. They must commit to ensuring refugee children in their countries are in school and learning, including making the necessary infrastructure available and removing the legal and financial barriers facing refugee children."

Save the Children will also be calling for a "New Deal for Every Forcibly Displaced Child", which includes internally displaced people, refugees and asylum seekers, all of whom are extremely vulnerable to separation from their families, neglect, physical or sexual abuse, death or injury, trafficking, or economical exploitation — with those on the move particularly exposed to these risks.

"We believe that every forcibly displaced child deserves a deal which guarantees their rights to a safe and productive life so, in addition to our commitments on education, we want to establish national and cross-border protection for children on the move between countries of origin, transit and destination," says Miles.

"We also encourage the implementation of existing internationally agreed norms and standards, including the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and UN Security Council Resolutions on children and armed conflict."

Save the Childrengives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



New "Still Most Shocking Second a Day" film gives child's view on the terrifying reality for thousands of children fleeing conflict

Media Contact
Jeremy Soulliere 203.295.5842 (M)

Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (May 9, 2016) — In recognition of the devastating impact that the refugee crisis is having on children, Save the Children is launching the sequel to its "Most Shocking Second a Day" viral video, which amassed over 50 million views and was one of the most successful viral videos of the last two years.

The new film, "Still Most Shocking Second a Day" picks up where the previous one left off, following the story of a young girl forced to leave behind everything she’s ever known after a hypothetical war breaks out on the streets of London.

The video highlights the terrifying reality for thousands of children fleeing conflict, as seen through a child's eyes, following 11-year-old Lily as she escapes the UK to embark on a dangerous journey in search of a new life.

Risking their lives in over-crowded boats, frightened and vulnerable, a total of over 325,000* children have now crossed the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas, fleeing war, poverty and persecution in search of a better, safer life. An estimated 340* children have drowned since September - that's an average of two children a day.

Inspired by the stories of child refugees that Save the Children has assisted in Europe and the Middle East, the film reimagines Britain as a conflict zone, as if the refugee crisis were happening in London.

"This video captures the terrible experiences of thousands of children every day, many undertaking horrific journeys that no one should ever have to endure. We wanted to bring home the reality of what it's like for those children, to capture the public’s attention," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children.

"Lily's journey is like those of hundreds of thousands of other child refugees searching for a better life.

"This is a generation of children who have lost everything- their home, their education, their family and in some cases their lives. Save the Children is calling for more support for children fleeing these conflict zones. We want a new deal for refugees, to ensure every child gets an education, protection and a fair start in life.

"Unless the international community provides safe and legal routes to families fleeing war and persecution, children will continue to undertake dangerous journeys in search of safety."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Note to editors:

*UNHCR DATA – Statistics* taken UNHCR Migrant arrivals January 2015 – March 2016 - 2015-2016 there were 325,975 children who arrived in Europe (arrivals to Greece (01/04/2016) & Italy (29/2/2016)

*IOM/UNHCR DATA – An estimated 340* children have drowned since September 2015 – February 2016

SUPPORTING CONTENT (stills from the video; behind-the-scenes photos, etc.)



ALT TEXT

Media Contact
Wendy Christian (203) 465–8010 (M)
Negin Janati (203) 212-0044 (M)
Michelle Levi (310) 873-5010 (M)

The Shriver Report Snapshot: Insight Into The Resilient American Mother

Today's American Mom is Resilient and Optimistic but Deeply Concerned About the Complexities of the Modern Climate in Which She is Raising her Children
More than Half Fear that America is Becoming a Worse Place to be a Parent and Two Thirds Believe their Children are Less Safe than they Were as Kids
Nearly Two Thirds of Working Moms Believe American Businesses are making it "Nearly Impossible" For Them to Juggle Work and Family Demands
More Than Half are Living Paycheck to Paycheck
But Nine in Ten Report Being Optimistic about their Future, their Children's Future and their Own Ability to Raise Independent and Caring Kids
American Mothers are Conflicted on Whether Technology and Social Media do More Harm than Good
An Overwhelming Number of American Moms Believe that Education is the Single Most Important Issue for Lawmakers to Address and are Much More Likely to Back a Candidate Who Supports Early Childhood Education

LOS ANGELES, Tuesday, May 3, 2016 – Today's American mom is resilient and optimistic but deeply concerned about the complexities of modern life and the environment in which she is doing her job according to a non-partisan survey of more than 1,000 mothers released today. The Shriver Report Snapshot: Insight into the Resilient American Mother reveals the modern mother is optimistic in her own strength and resolve to raise independent and caring children but challenged by the shortcomings of the entrenched institutions meant to support her.

In America today, more than half of all mothers are living paycheck to paycheck. Nearly two thirds of working moms say that the American business culture makes it "nearly impossible" to juggle work and family life. Mothers are torn on the role of social media and technology and are taking on a lion's share of housekeeping and parenting responsibilities. Overall two thirds of mothers believe that their children are less safe than they were as children and most say it is harder to be a mother today than it was in their parent's generation. In fact, a majority (53%) say America is becoming a worse place to raise children while only 15% believe it is getting better.

Yet, despite growing concerns about the challenges their children face – including declining moral values, violence in schools, sexual predators and bullying – most mothers express confidence about raising their children and are strikingly optimistic about their children's future. Nine of ten moms report they are at least "somewhat" optimistic about their children's future, and over half say they are "very optimistic." Amidst this backdrop, the conflicted, yet resilient, American mom sees education reform as the best hope for their children's future and the top priority for leaders and lawmakers to address.

These findings are the result of a national survey commissioned by Save the Children, Save the Children Action Network and Shriver Media and conducted online by the national polling group, PSB, in March 2016. More than 1,050 mothers who are likely to vote in the 2016 presidential election participated in the survey, with a margin of error of ±2.47%.

The findings come in the middle of a turbulent presidential election race in which the gender gap in voting between men and women is likely to become a significant factor in the November general election. In 2012, nearly 10 million more women than men voted for president. The gap could widen even further this fall when more than 20 million mothers with children living at home – more than 1 in 4 of all likely women voters – are expected to vote for president, making mothers who vote a sizable but often overlooked segment of the electorate.

According to the survey, most moms believe it is getting harder to be a parent today compared to previous generations and they worry about a host of social ills including a weakening economy, shifting American values, increased violence and a decline in the quality of education. In fact, when asked to identify the most important issue for the next president, mothers overwhelmingly cited education reform including making college more affordable, ensuring a fair chance to succeed in school and increased access to high quality early childhood education. Given all this, the survey also shows that American moms remain remarkably resilient and "optimistic", believing that their children will achieve success through hard work despite many challenges.

"As a mother of four and an advocate for women's empowerment, I am thrilled to partner with Save the Children and the Save the Children Action Network to share this Snapshot on the modern American mom," said Maria Shriver founder of Shriver Media and the Shriver Report Special Editions and Snapshots. "American mothers are resilient, tough and optimistic but political and business leaders - all of our institutions - need to adjust to the needs of the modern American family so that mothers and their children can not only survive but can thrive in today's complex environment."

"Clearly, moms believe it's much harder to raise kids today than it was in the past. But moms of all political persuasions see education reform as the number one task of the next president," said Mark Shriver, President of Save the Children Action Network. "In fact, 83 percent of moms – Republicans, Democrats and Independents – said they would likely support a political candidate who is in favor of expanding quality early childhood education programs in the U.S., which they believe is critical to America's future. These moms know that all kids deserve a strong start in life."

"This Mother's Day it's important to not only celebrate moms, but also to really listen to what they need," said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. "This poll tells us that women are feeling a lot of pressure, and are demanding more from their partners, workplaces, and elected leaders. I've met mothers across the U.S., some hanging on by a thread, and it's clear that if we want to see stronger families and communities, then we need to support mothers because they are the backbone of society. We can't underestimate the power of a mother. Some of our most critical programs to support children, schools and communities are created and sustained by moms. As a mom myself, I want to continue to help support mothers because if we support the moms, then we help to create stronger families, communities, and our country."

SNAPSHOT'S KEY FINDINGS

An Overwhelming Number of American Moms Believe that Education is the Most Important Issue for Business Leaders, Lawmakers and Parents to Address

  • Most mothers cite education reform as the next president's top priority, recommending a special focus on addressing the high cost of college tuition and ensuring children have a fair chance to succeed in school. The survey also found 83% of moms likely to support a political candidate who supported providing access to and improving the quality of early childhood education programs in America.
  • American moms want their kids to get a good education, not go to war. The most damaging thing the next president can do for their children according to American moms is get the US into another war.

A Majority of U.S. Moms ––Say America is Becoming a Worse Place to Raise Children

  • Only 15% of American mothers believe America is becoming a better place to raise children while 53% say it is worsening. White (57%) and Black (54%) mothers are especially critical of the country's direction.
  • 56% say it is harder to parent today than it was in their parents' generation
  • When asked which issues were among the top three reasons America is becoming a worse place for kids, 53% cited increased violence, 36% said worsening economic conditions, 35% mentioned an undervaluation of social standards and 33% said the quality of education is worsening.
  • Two-thirds of mothers believe their children are less safe than they were as children. White and black mothers are more inclined to feel this way. Mothers rank declining moral values (35%), violence in schools (33%), sexual predators (27%) and bullying (26%) at the top of their list of concerns for their children.

Despite Deep Concerns, Faith in the American Dream Prevails for 9 in 10 American Moms Who Say they are "Optimistic" about their Children's Future, their own Future and Believe Hard Work will Lead to Success

  • 9 in 10 moms say they are "very" or "somewhat" optimistic about their children's future and over half (52%) say they are "very optimistic." 9 in 10 are also optimistic about their own future.
  • White mothers are most likely to say that America is becoming a worse place to raise kids and are most likely to cite declines in social standards and the quality of education as reasons. Black mothers are the most optimistic about the future but are also the most worried about school violence. While 6 in 10 Latinas were optimistic for their kids' futures they were the most likely to say they were "anxious" about that future.
  • When mothers were asked to describe their feelings about their children's future, "hopeful" and "optimistic" were the most commonly referenced words though they were immediately followed by "worried," "uncertain" and "anxious."
  • 3 in 4 say with hard work their kids will achieve personal and professional success – it will just be harder for them than earlier generations. Specifically, 76% say they are confident that their kids will be able to achieve their personal and professional goals if they work hard. Only 24% say that they are worried that their children will not be able to achieve success.

Almost Two Thirds of American Moms Believe American Businesses are making it "Nearly Impossible" for Them to Juggle Work and Family

  • A majority of moms (55%) are living paycheck to paycheck and staying on top of bills is the leading cause of stress. This includes a majority of moms working full time and two thirds of those earning less than $75,000 a year.
  • The survey provides additional support for the 2013 Shriver Report: A Woman's Nation Pushes Back from the Brink produced by A Woman's Nation which first reported that one in three women in America are living on the brink of poverty – 42 million women plus the 18 million children who depend on them.
  • Nearly two thirds (62 percent) of moms working full time believe that American business culture makes it "nearly impossible" to balance their responsibilities to family and work.
  • More than four in 10 (42%) American moms report feeling "more stress" than those around them.
  • The vast majority of mothers – including those who work full time – say they are responsible for the lion's share of household and parenting duties. 82% of mothers, including 75% of those who work full time, say they take on a larger role in house work than their partner. Similarly, 75% of mothers (including 70% who work full time) say they take on more parenting duties than their partner.
  • One in 3 moms (34%) relies on outside childcare, and less than a third of American moms rely on their family members for childcare always or often.
  • When asked what employer benefits would most help their families, the most popular responses were: flexible work hours (53%), more affordable health care (51%) and good retirement benefits (49%).
  • Paid leave for caregiving (16%), in-office day care (15%) and paid parental leave (11%) ranked much lower overall but higher among millennial moms with young children.

Moms Value Independence Above Other Qualities – Especially for Daughters - and One Third Say "Caring" is the Most Important Quality for Both Sons and Daughters in the Most Powerful Nation in the World

  • 46% of mothers rank "independence" as a top quality they want to see in their daughters. 35% of mothers want the same for their sons. Being successful, caring and intellectually curious are also critical qualities in both sons and daughters for American moms. American mothers emphasize being "honorable" and "committed to family" for their sons.

Younger (Millennial) Moms are Most Optimistic, Most Secure in Society's Expectations of Them and Most Frustrated by Corporate America

  • 51% of Millennial moms (those aged 18 to 34) say they are "very optimistic" about their own future, compared to 38% of Gen X moms (aged 35 to 50) and 32% Baby Boomers (aged 51 to 70). 65% of millennial moms say they are very optimistic about their children's future, compared to 47% of Gen X moms and 44% of Boomer moms.
  • 68% of millennial moms feel that American business culture has made it "nearly impossible" to balance family and work compared to 60% of Gen X and 54% of Baby Boomer moms.
  • 84% of millennial moms say they have a clear sense of what society expects from them.

American Moms Think a Mother Would Best Represent Their Children in Political Office; Hillary Clinton Receives Most Support from Moms Polled

  • 28% say Hillary Clinton would best represent their children's needs in the White House followed by Bernie Sanders (20%) Donald Trump (15%) and Ted Cruz (8%).
  • Most mothers agree that elected officials who are mothers themselves are likely to do more for their children than those who are not.

Impact of Social Media and Technology Divides American Moms Evenly

  • American moms are conflicted about the role technology plays in their children's lives. 50% say its prevalence has had a positive effect on their children while 50% say it has or will hurt their children.
  • The four biggest concerns mothers have about technology and social media are: online predators, exposure to inappropriate or sexual content, a lack of real life interaction and a lack of physical activity and exercise.
  • The 50% of moms who say technology has had a positive impact mention increased access to educational tools, its help preparing kids for a technology-driven future and the ability connect with friends and family.

###

Shriver Media is a socially conscious media company that produces films, documentaries, original digital reporting and live events to inform, inspire, enlighten and entertain. Our team collaborates with like-minded partners and offers diverse media brands that we believe can impact individuals and society in a positive way. We ignite hearts and minds.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood – every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Save the Children Action Network is the political voice for kids. We believe that every child deserves the best start in life. That's why we're building bipartisan will and voter support to make sure every child in the U.S. has access to high-quality early learning and that no mother or child around the globe dies from a preventable disease. By investing in kids and holding leaders accountable, we are helping kids from birth to age five survive and thrive.

PSB (formerly Penn Schoen Berland) conducted the survey March 7 – 15, 2016. PSB conducted 1,053 online interviews with American mothers on their opinions on The 2016 Presidential Election and Expectations for their own and their Children's Future. To qualify for the survey, mothers must have at least one child under 18 living at home and be likely to vote in the 2016 presidential election. The sample was demographically representative of ages, ethnicities and political affiliations. Margin of error for the total general population sample is ±2.47%.



Media Contact
media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (April 28, 2016) — Save the Children strongly condemns the deadly bombing of a hospital in Aleppo yesterday evening, as violent attacks rapidly escalate in northern Syria with dozens of civilians killed and wounded in the past few days.

Last night’s airstrike on Al Quds hospital reportedly killed several children and the area’s only remaining pediatrician, as well as other medical staff and civilians. The hospital has one of the largest pediatric units in the city and many children are likely to be left without care as a result.

The hospital bombing comes as the latest round of peace talks falters and the cessation of hostilities agreed in February is disintegrating into bloodshed. Save the Children partners in the area have reported almost constant bombing and shelling this week, and urgent action is needed to save the small but crucial gains of the past few months.

“Bombing hospitals that are treating sick children is a despicable act. This latest attack will deprive thousands of people of essential healthcare at a time when their homes and neighborhoods are again being destroyed by a new surge in bombing and shelling,” says Sonia Khush, Save the Children’s Syria Country Director.

Targeting of hospitals and health facilities has become common in Syria. Earlier this week, another hospital in nearby Al Atareb, just outside Aleppo, was bombed.

Save the Children calls for an end the targeting of hospitals and health facilities, and other civilian infrastructure such as schools. We urge the international community and the parties to the conflict to ensure that the current round of peace talks do not fail, and recommit to a full cessation of hostilities.

Save the Children works with local partners to run health programs across northern Syria, including supporting seven health clinics. In the past month Save the Children supported measles and polio vaccination campaigns for more than 280,000 children.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



The New Initiative Continues to Invest in the Philanthropic Partnership through its New Youth Empowerment Program, Intended to Improve the “Soft Skills,” Capacities and Economic Conditions of Deprived Youth

Bulgari’s new Save the Children bracelet goes on sale in May.

Bulgari’s new Save the Children bracelet goes on sale in May.

Media Contact
media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (April 28, 2016) — To honor its on-going philanthropic partnership with Save the Children, Bulgari has created a beautiful new sterling silver and black ceramic bracelet for its Save the Children jewelry collection.

Bearing the Save the Children logo, the stunning bracelet adds to the emblematic collection – comprised originally of a ring and a pendant – each piece inspired by Bulgari’s iconic B.zero1 jewelry line.

Available in Bulgari stores worldwide, select department stores, and on Bulgari’s website (in the U.S. and Japan) in May, the bracelet retails for $510 of which $100 is directly donated to Save the Children.

Bulgari believes that education is the best investment to build a prosperous, healthy, and just society. By adding a bracelet to the collection, the jeweler wishes to increase the positive impact its Save the Children partnership has had on vulnerable young lives. In 2016 the partnership is strengthened by a new bespoke initiative, one that empowers youth to enhance their “soft skills,” build upon their capacities, and improve their economic conditions as they pursue their own journeys from deprivation to success.

To date, the wildly successful sales of the custom-designed Bulgari collection has helped to raise $42 million for Save the Children. These donations have reached 1 million beneficiaries in 29 countries across five continents, in areas where natural disasters, wars or conflict, marginalization, disability or poverty can hinder the right to education and a better future

ABOUT BULGARI’S SAVE THE CHILDREN JEWELRY COLLECTION

Too many children are unable to attain their aspirations, as the lack of education perpetuates the cycle of poverty. In 2009, Bulgari decided to take action on behalf of disadvantaged children around the world by partnering with Save the Children. It launched a campaign of unprecedented ambition and scope, from which a considerable portion of the proceeds from the sale of Save the Children jewelry – custom-designed by Bulgari – are donated to the charity.

ABOUT BVLGARI

Part of the LVMH Group, Bulgari was founded in Rome in 1884 as a jewelry shop. Quickly establishing a reputation for Italian excellence, Bulgari enjoys renown for exquisite craftsmanship and magnificent jewelry creations. The Company’s international success has evolved into a global and diversified luxury purveyor of products and services ranging from fine jewels and watches to accessories and perfumes, with an unrivalled network of boutiques and hotels in the world’s most exclusive shopping areas.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati

Washington, D.C. (April 20, 2016) — Twelve months after the Nepal earthquakes, which affected 8 million people, homeless families are still living in temporary shelters covered by tarps, under bridges and in unsafe buildings, as 600,000 households remain without permanent shelter.

Alongside this continuing challenge, the aid agency today launches a new report revealing that many of the most marginalized and vulnerable communities missed out on aid like cash distributions during the critical emergency response phase of the relief effort.

"Though millions of people in Nepal have been reached with vital healthcare, water and hygiene support, food, temporary shelter and education, the response could have been better in some areas," Save the Children Country Director, Delailah Borja said.

Ms. Borja said the mountainous terrain of Nepal, poor conditions of roads and fuel shortages added to the difficulty in reaching the most isolated and vulnerable communities. Despite these challenges Save the Children has reached over 580,000 earthquake survivors so far, and continues to work on the ground offering much needed support where it can.

"Getting out to many of the more remote and often badly-affected areas was almost impossible with roads cut off from landslides, while many villages were only accessible by foot," she said. "No formal rebuilding program has commenced in the past 12 months, and that's in part due to the sheer scale of the disaster and the massive logistical challenges in an extremely mountainous region.

"Millions of families are still living in the temporary shelter supplied by aid agencies months ago, having already braved a very cold winter and are now facing the prospect of another monsoon season, which will start in June.

"Save the Children has been preparing its shelter program for months now, which includes training 6,000 masons in safe rebuilding practices and preparing cash grants for 6,000 households– a value of $12 million- that will allow vulnerable households to commence rebuilding. When we are given the green light, we will be ready to go."

Save the Children's report, "Did the Humanitarian Response to the Nepal Earthquake Ensure No One Was Left Behind?" analyzed the effectiveness of the emergency response, in particular the targeting and distribution of aid to the most vulnerable groups in Nepal.

A number of areas for improvement were identified, including the local governments request to use 'blanket' rather than targeted distributions of aid, poor communication with isolated communities and elderly or disabled people, and a lack of thorough assessment to work out which families were most in need.

"For example, cash handouts were payable only to the owner of the house, meaning those who were renting or living in a home registered to somebody else didn’t get the money they desperately needed and were entitled to," Ms. Borja said.

"A number of aid agencies including Save the Children used helicopters to deliver aid, but even then it could only be to a central point where landing was possible, meaning those affected still needed to walk – often for several hours – to that central point to get the aid they had been allocated.

"The sheer scale of the disaster, with 8 million people affected, is enormous – Nepal hasn’t faced a challenge like this in decades."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Many Parents and Child-Care Providers Are Not Receiving Critical Support or Training

Flint smoothie project

Brianna, 5, is a participant in Save the Children's smoothie program at her daycare at Alpha Montessori School at the YWCA in Flint, Mich. She just tried a new recipe, "purple," which is made of blueberries and spinach. She liked it so much, she asked for seconds. The Save the Children smoothie program is helping children to eat healthy, nutrient-rich foods to mitigate the impact of lead exposure. Save the Children is in Flint, responding to the water crisis. Alpha child care serves 90 children, over 60 of whom are from low-income, vulnerable families. Photo by Stuart Sia / Save the Children.

Flint smoothie project

Adonai, 4, says she loves chocolate, but she also loves apples, carrots, and strawberries. "Pink is my favorite." Her grandma, who she calls 'grammy,' came early to pick her up, but let her stay a little bit longer for the smoothies. "It's good!" she tells grammy, who is sampling the smoothies. Photo by Stuart Sia / Save the Children photo.

Media Contact
Jeanne-Aimee DeMarrais 203.919.2219 (M)

Flint, Mich. (April 20, 2016) — Young children are the most vulnerable to injury from lead, and yet a significant portion of the population in Flint may not be receiving critical information that they can trust on how to protect their children from lead poisoning. State officials have been educating families through public schools, but parents of the more than 1,000 babies and young children who attend child care (non-state or federally funded) in the city of Flint have been receiving conflicting information and are not sure which messages to trust. Save the Children is working in Flint with the University of Michigan-Flint to assess and document critical gaps at more than 50 child-care programs in Flint that serve close to 1,000 young children.

Results from the first 15 site visits indicate that child-care providers are seeing concerning changes in young children's behaviors, including increased aggression and impulsive behaviors that are often associated with lead poisoning. And some providers are reporting that no one has reached out to help them.

While child care providers are the first responders for many of these children, they are not yet receiving the resources that they need to support young children.

Save the Children is one of the only national organization expert in emergencies and early childhood learning that is reaching this group of programs and families in Flint.

"We are here to give the children a fighting chance," said Jeanne-Aimee DeMarrais, Save the Children's senior director of U.S. emergencies.

"Save the Children has come to Michigan to empower child-care providers to support the young children in their care," added DeMarrais. "Our experts have been leading assessments and outreach to the child-care programs in Flint – and we are providing information and resources to support their immediate needs.

"Over the next weeks and months, Save the Children will be helping teach them about the important brain development that takes place in the critical first five years of life. We will teach providers and parents how to help mitigate the impact of lead on children's growth and development, before their child even enters elementary school."

In the past two months, Save the Children has built strong partnerships with the early childhood community in Flint to ensure that the most vulnerable children, ages pre-birth to 6, as well as pregnant women, have their voices brought to the table for both response and recovery efforts.

Save the Children's efforts have focused on mitigating the impact of lead in young children by helping ensure they have access to nutrient-rich foods and early learning. The global children's organization has also supported the distribution of safe water for families in the affected communities, helping over 11,000 people in Flint, to date, of whom over 3,000 are young children.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



aftermath of 2016 earthquake in Ecuador

(AP/Carlos Sacoto)

Families Spend the Night Outside to Avoid Impact of Aftershocks

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (April 19, 2016) — Hundreds of children have reportedly been pulled out of the rubble alive by Ecuadorian authorities and local people, while thousands of families have slept out in the open to avoid the impact of further aftershocks in the wake of the 7.8-magnitude earthquake which struck off the coast of Ecuador on the evening of April 16th.

"Rescue efforts have succeeded in saving the lives of many children who were trapped under the rubble in the immediate aftermath of the quake, with some families still searching through the debris for friends and relatives with their bare hands," says Maria Villalobos, Country Director for Save the Children Ecuador and Peru.

"There are still at least 200 people missing, including infants and the elderly, and we remain hugely concerned that emergency access to many areas remains difficult due to landslides, falling buildings, and unstable roads and power supplies."

Ecuador's worst earthquake since 1979 has resulted in 413 confirmed deaths so far, and left an estimated 3,000 injured, with an additional 3,000-5,000 people now in urgent need of emergency shelter assistance.

"Temporary camps are being set up as quickly as humanly possible but many families have spent the night outside in the open in a bid to avoid building collapse or falling wreckage, and we are still receiving numerous reports of children who can’t find their parents or siblings."

At least 500 buildings have reportedly been destroyed across the affected provinces, with 146 schools severely affected, three universities closed, and a number of key health centers and hospitals reporting devastating damage, making treating the wounded increasingly problematic.

"The authorities have deployed mobile hospitals and rapid response units to the worst-affected cities, including the center of Portoviejo, Manabí, which has been completely destroyed. Currently, only 5 percent of the population has access to electricity and nine roads into the province have been completely blocked by debris," adds Villalobos.

"Obviously this is an extremely dangerous and chaotic environment for the most vulnerable, particularly unaccompanied children or those that are badly injured and trapped in isolated areas."

A state of national emergency is now in full force in Manabí, where more than 200 people died, as well as in Santa Elena, Esmeraldas, Guayas, Santo Domingo de los Tsáchilas, and Los Rios.

Alongside the Ecuadorian government and local authorities, Save the Children is working around the clock to help affected families, with particular focus on the northern part of the country, in Muisne, Esmeraldas Province.

"Muisne is already one of the poorest areas within Esmeraldas Province, with 98 percent of the population living below the poverty line and 80 percent living in rural areas. Now, close to 90 percent of infrastructure here has been critically damaged by the quake and aftershocks, leaving at least half of the population displaced and a high percentage of children considered to be at risk," says Villalobos.

"Schools are currently on vacation and are scheduled to reopen on May 1st, depending on the damage that is reported in the next few days, so we will distribute 1,500 student kits to ensure that children have the materials to go back to school and restart their education as soon as possible.

"We will also be providing psychosocial support to children, as well as delivering 800 household kits which include emergency tents, food, electricity generators, and hygiene kits, and assessing the damage to existing water systems."

The widespread destruction of infrastructure will require the full resources of the government and emergency services, with some 10,000 troops and 3,500 police already present in the affected areas.

An 18-person United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) team has also been deployed to Pedernales to support coordination and initial assessments, including Roberto Martínez, Humanitarian Coordinator for Save the Children Spain.

"We know children are always the most vulnerable after any disaster," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children US. "Our priority is to make sure the children and families affected by this earthquake are safe, healthy, and able to regain a sense of normalcy as soon as possible."

To learn more about Save the Children and how you can help, please visit SavetheChildren.org, and follow this link to donate to Save the Children's response.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



aftermath of 2016 earthquake in Ecuador

(AP/Carlos Sacoto)

Media Contact
Wendy Christian 203.465.8010 (M) Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (April 18, 2016) — The 7.8-magnitude earthquake which struck off the coast of Ecuador on the evening of April 16th has had a devastating impact on thousands of children, with lives lost and homes and schools damaged or destroyed, says Save the Children.

The impact of the earthquake – Ecuador's biggest since 1979 – followed by a 5.6-magnitude aftershock, has killed at least 350 people, and injured an estimated 2,608, according to Ecuadorian Security Minister César Navas. A state of national emergency is now in full force in the province of Manabi, where over 200 people died, as well as in Santa Elena, Esmeraldas, Guayas, Santo Domingo de los Tsáchilas, and Los Rios.

Save the Children is on the ground in Ecuador working to establish the impact on children, homes and schools. The safety and protection of children and their families trapped in the country's worst-affected areas is the agency's key priority, as well as delivering emergency tents, food, cooking supplies, electricity generators, and hygiene kits in coordination with the national government, and supporting affected schools to ensure that children can return to class as soon as possible.

"Hundreds of buildings, including schools and health centers, have either been badly damaged or totally destroyed, and there are huge fears of further aftershocks. Many survivors are still being pulled out of the rubble, with some families searching through the debris for friends and relatives with their bare hands," says Maria Villalobos, Country Director for Save the Children Ecuador and Peru.

"Obviously this is an extremely dangerous, chaotic environment for the most vulnerable, particularly young, unaccompanied children or those that are badly injured in remote areas, and we have already heard numerous reports of lost children who can't find their families in the aftermath of the earthquake.

"The authorities have deployed mobile hospitals and rapid response units have already moved to the worst-affected cities, Pedernales and Portoviejo, with medical volunteers on their way. Save the Children is working round the clock to help affected families find refuge in temporary shelters which are currently in the process of being set up."

The widespread destruction of infrastructure will require the full resources of the government and emergency services, with some 10,000 troops and 3,500 police already present in the affected areas.

An 18-person United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) team has also been deployed to Pedernales to support coordination and initial assessments, including Roberto Martínez, Humanitarian Coordinator for Save the Children Spain.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



aftermath of 2016 earthquake in Ecuador

(AP/Carlos Sacoto)

Media Contact
Claire Garmirian 203.981.8137 (M)
Wendy Christian 203.465.8010 (M)

Washington, D.C. (April 17, 2016) — Save the Children staff will be working in the days and weeks ahead to give support where we can to those most affected by this earthquake, particularly children.

The rising number of dead and injured and the widespread destruction will require the full resources of the government and emergency services.

Save the Children will use our existing networks across the country to assess the needs of those most affected and help where we can. Our teams on the ground have emergency supplies ready to distribute.

“Our thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured, ” said Maria Villalobos, Country Director for Save the Children Ecuador and Peru.

“Children are among the worst affected by this disaster, with many being injured and left without homes. We already have teams on the ground who are working with the Ecuadorian Humanitarian Network to assess the needs of children and respond accordingly. The safety and protection of children and their families is our main priority and we will focus our efforts on the worst affected areas.”

For more information on how to help children and families affected by the earthquake, visit savethechildren.org.

Spokesperson in Ecuador is available for interviews- Maria Villalobos; maria.villalobos@savethechildren.org, +51 99840 4127

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April, 12, 2016) — Save the Children today praised the House of Representatives for passing the bipartisan Global Food Security Act of 2016 (H.R. 1567) and all the Members of Congress who lead the way in the fight against global hunger and malnutrition.

Joining together with nearly 70 other organizations, we now urge the Senate to swiftly pass this important, bipartisan bill that will advance U.S. leadership in tackling global hunger and malnutrition around the world.

The bipartisan Global Food Security Act is an exciting step forward in the worldwide effort to end global hunger and malnutrition in our lifetime. Hunger and malnutrition prevent millions of people in developing countries from living healthy, productive lives and stunt the mental and physical development of future generations.

The Act includes the development and implementation of a comprehensive, whole-of-government strategy to combat hunger and malnutrition in developing countries. The strategy focuses on increasing sustainable and equitable agricultural development; reducing global hunger; and improving nutrition – especially in the key first 1,000 days between a woman’s pregnancy and her child’s second birthday.

The legislation also promotes country ownership and accountability, improving upon existing monitoring and evaluation practices to ensure U.S. taxpayer investments are implemented transparently, efficiently, and effectively.

We look forward to continuing to work with Congress and the Obama Administration to make the Global Food Security Act law this year and ensure U.S. leadership continues to sustainably tackle global hunger, malnutrition, and extreme poverty.

Save the Children invests in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. In the United States and around the world, we give children a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Washington, D.C. (April 8, 2016) — Save the children is warning that at least 6 million children in Ethiopia are facing critical food shortages as a result of the worst drought in 50 years.

Newly appointed CEO of Save the Children International, Helle Thorning-Schmidt, urges the international community to step up its support.

"If we act now we can prevent the suffering of children who are at severe risk of chronic hunger and food shortage. Thousands of children are at high risk of malnutrition and waterborne diseases. Families are on the move, desperate to find food and water. By any measure, Ethiopia now ranks among the most pressing humanitarian crises in the world."

The Ethiopian Government has been providing strong leadership to respond to the drought and has committed an unprecedented $380 million USD. Communities are better prepared and equipped than they have ever been, but the Ethiopian government still needs support to avoid the worst effects of the crisis.

Thorning-Schmidt, who visited the badly affected region of Sitti Zone yesterday, continues "we have the right early warning system in place to prevent potentially enormous human suffering, but, what use is early warning if the international community doesn’t come forward? Save the Children is urging the international community to respond."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact: Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, CT (April 3, 2016) — Save the Children expressed deep concern today over the deplorable conditions in Moria detention center on the Greek island of Lesvos, where more than 1,000 children, many traveling alone, are detained as part of the EU-Turkey deal.

In addition to concerns around the detention of asylum seekers, the agency is also shocked by the lack of safeguards in place for those likely to be returned to Turkey in less than 24 hours. It calls on European leaders to urgently rethink their proposal and suspend all transfers to Turkey until there is a guarantee that those in need of international protection will receive it.

“The situation inside Moria detention center is deteriorating rapidly,” said Simona Mortolini, Save the Children Team Leader in Greece. “We have spoken to families and children who are sleeping outside on the cold ground on thin blankets because there is nowhere else for them to sleep in the overcrowded accommodation facilities. The camp was initially designed to host a few hundred people transiting through within a day. It now hosts 3,300 people, many have been trapped there for more than a week.”

“People continue to arrive to the island and the number of families detained in the center continues to increase by the day. It is extremely dangerous for children and we are worried about their physical and mental well-being, especially those children travelling alone.”

“There are reports of protests and people have told us they will commit suicide if they are sent back to Turkey. Some said they will jump off the boats. People are absolutely desperate. They have sold all their worldly possessions to pay for the journey from Turkey to Greece, they already risked their lives at sea to make the crossing. There is nothing left for them to return to – in Turkey or in their countries of origin that are marred by wars and widespread violence and insecurity.”

As part of the new EU-Turkey deal, which came into effect on 20 March, newly-arrived vulnerable children and their families, regardless of their status, have been detained in closed facilities on the Greek islands until their individual interview and assessment take place – which could take weeks or months.

There are reports Greek authorities will start returning people to Turkey from tomorrow morning. Yet, it is unclear who will be on the boats and if they have had their claims for asylum properly assessed and given the chance for appeal.

“Save the Children believes that the way in which the EU-Turkey deal is being implemented is illegal and inhumane. The deal risks undermining the very principle of international protection for vulnerable people fleeing war and persecution,” Mortolini said.

 

“EU leaders need to suspend returns to Turkey until they put in place the necessary legal and procedural safeguards that ensure human rights are maintained.”

Save the Children launched a response in Greece last year and has so far helped more than 340,000 children and adults with essential support including food, hygiene items, shelter materials and clothes. We also provide safe spaces for children to play and learn, and areas for mothers to breastfeed and ensure their babies are receiving the right nutrients. Save the Children is scaling up its programs in Athens and the northern border regions to meet the needs of the thousands stranded there.

Save the Children invests in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. In the United States and around the world, we give children a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (March 23, 2016) — One year since the conflict in Yemen escalated, nearly 90 percent of children now need emergency humanitarian aid, yet the desperate plight of 10 million children is still being largely ignored, Save the Children said today.

The humanitarian agency warned that international governments are exacerbating the crisis and endangering children’s lives by choosing to support military action while ignoring the devastating consequences for civilians.

“An entire generation of children – the future of Yemen – is being abandoned to their fate,” says Edward Santiago, Save the Children’s Country Director in Yemen.

“For millions of children here, the terror of airstrikes and shelling, and the destruction of everything around them has become a daily fact of life. This must not be allowed to continue.

“Even before the current crisis spiraled, Yemen was already the poorest and least developed country in the Middle East, but now thousands more children’s lives are at real risk as long as the fighting continues and the delivery of vital humanitarian aid and commercial supplies continues to be obstructed.”

A new Save the Children briefing note, Yemen’s Children Suffering in Silence, illustrates how a year of war has created a humanitarian crisis that ranks as one of the worst in the world, with most areas facing extreme, and often deadly, shortages of medicine, food and fuel.

“A doctor at a Save the Children-supported hospital in Sana’a told us how a newborn baby died last month during a power cut when incubators shut down for an hour and there was no fuel left to run the back-up generators.” says Santiago.

“Other health facilities we work with report running out of even simple materials such as sterile bandages, antibiotics and iodine, and have all reported cases of potentially fatal conditions doubling, or in some cases tripling, over the past six months, including malaria, severe acute malnourishment, respiratory problems, and diarrhea.”

A recent assessment by Save the Children health and nutrition teams in Sa’ada also found critical shortages of therapeutic foods, which are used to treat malnourished children.

“One in three Yemeni children under five are now acutely malnourished, with nearly 10 million without access to clean water and more than eight million no longer having access to even basic health care,” says Santiago, adding that around 600 hospitals and health facilities have had to shut down due to damage or shortages.

An estimated six boys and girls killed or injured every day of the conflict, and civilians made up 93 percent of casualties when explosive weapons were used in populated areas during 2015—the crisis in Yemen has had a devastating psychological impact on children.

“A Save the Children study of 150 children in Aden and Lahj states found 70 percent suffering from symptoms associated with distress and trauma, including anxiety, low self-esteem, feelings of sadness, and lack of concentration,” Santiago explains.

“Worryingly, children are increasingly being recruited into armed groups, abducted and detained, and at risk from thousands of newly-laid landmines.”

Nearly half of school-age children are now also out of school in Yemen, with an average of two attacks on schools per week of the conflict, and more than 1,600 schools now closed or being used as emergency shelters for families who have fled their homes.

Despite the enormous needs, the UN Humanitarian Response Plan for Yemen was only 56 percent funded in 2015, and so far is only 12 percent funded for this year, with no funding at all received for education or child protection.

“Rich nations are turning a blind eye to children’s suffering, and in some cases are even making billions of dollars by selling weapons that continue to be used against civilians,” says Santiago.

“UN Security Council resolutions are being ignored and the conflict goes on with complete disregard for international law and the protection of civilians, particularly children. There needs to be much more aid to those suffering, and much more diplomatic pressure on those fighting in Yemen to end the conflict.”

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (March 15, 2016) — Save the Children worked through the night on Monday to deliver blankets and warm clothes to thousands of refugees and migrants in Greece and Macedonia who had been left stranded after attempting to leave the camp at Idomeni and cross the border.

Appalling conditions at the Idomeni camp, where families have been stuck for weeks after the border was arbitrarily closed, and a lack of other options pushed up to 4,000 people to try to cross a river to reach the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Families packed up whatever they could carry and waded across the fast-flowing river, carrying young children on their backs.

The authorities started sending people back in trucks to Greece late at night, dropping children off shivering, wet and disoriented. After travelling all day, they were left to walk back to Idomeni camp in the middle of the night. Some people collapsed by the roadside and needed medical attention on the tarmac and those that made it back to the camp faced a night out in the open, with rain starting to fall at around 4:30 a.m. Up to 600 people remained stuck on the other side of the river.

Carolyn Miles from Save the Children said: “After weeks waiting in increasingly appalling conditions on the border, families have been left feeling they have nothing left to lose. They would rather brave a river crossing on a cold evening on the way to an uncertain future, than wait in limbo to potentially be sent back across the Aegean Sea.

“The scenes we saw last night were shocking and are a direct reaction to the wholly inadequate response of European leaders to this crisis, which treats people like bargaining chips and leaves them stranded with no safe plan for their future. The European migration plan that is currently on the table is pushing children to seek alternative, more dangerous routes to reach safety, making them easy prey for smugglers and traffickers.”

Save the Children is calling on European leaders to make legal routes for those seeking asylum, including family reunification, the core pillar of any European response to the crisis. Refugees, many of whom have fled the wars in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, have the right to have their requests for asylum evaluated on an individual basis, while mass returns often deny those individual rights.

Save the Children runs a child friendly space and mother and baby area in Idomeni, and has provided thousands of winter jackets, blankets, and rainproof jackets to children and families at the camp. We have also distributed more than 16,000 meals consisting of rice porridge and fruit to children, and pregnant and breastfeeding mothers in the last week.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Save the Children global artist ambassador posts selfie with son and football-loving Syrian refugee boy who was severely impacted by war

Media Contact: Media@savechildren.org

 

FAIRFIELD, CT (March 13, 2016) — As the five-year mark for the Syrian war approaches,Cristiano Ronaldo, a Save the Children global artist ambassador since 2012, is aiming to bring focus back to the children of the ravaged country, where life has continued to deteriorate for the most vulnerable.

To show his support, the internationally renowned soccer player for Real Madrid posted to his social media channels a selfie with his 5-year-old son, Cristiano Ronaldo Jr., holding a photo of very special soccer-loving Syrian refugee boy, named Ayman*, who is also five years old.

Cristiano Ronaldo Facebook

Cristiano Ronaldo Twitter

Cristiano Ronaldo Instagram

Born when the Syrian war began, life in a war zone took a devastating toll on Ayman, so much so, he did not speak – ever. He saw and heard things that no child should see, from armed men breaking down doors, to dead bodies lying in the street to sirens going off at all hours.

His family fled to the border of Jordan where they joined tens of thousands of Syrian families in the Za’atari refugee camp. Help finally came when Ayman’s parents enrolled him in a Save the Children-supported kindergarten, called Little Hands, at the camp. There, he began to speak – through the help of a caring teacher, his supportive parents and a love of soccer that blossomed.

Play, such as soccer is important for a child’s development. It teaches children essential skills like how to count, how to solve problems and how to get along with others.

Ronaldo, who often posts photos with his son, wanted to use his social media megaphone to ensure that the world does not lose focus on the littlest victims of this war – the children. The mega-star recently reached 200 million social media followers, making him the most-followed athlete on a global scale.

“With a young son of his own, Cristiano Ronaldo understands how vulnerable children are at that age,” said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. “With Ronaldo’s help, we can keep the focus on the children of the Syrian war, many of whom have known nothing but war their entire life.After five years of this conflict, we don’t want the world to forget the children – they shouldn’t have to pay the price for the world’s inaction."

Ronaldo’s selfie comes on the heels of Save the Children’s new report “Childhood Under Siege,” which was recently released ahead of the five-year mark of the war in Syria on Tues., March 15.

The report estimates that more than 250,000 children have been in constant fear for their lives for many months in Syria's besieged areas. Parents testify to not only dealing with the psychological impact on children terrified of explosions, but the dire consequences of being deprived of food, basic medicine and clean water.

*Name has been changed for protection

Save the Children invests in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. In the United States and around the world, we give children a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Media@savechildren.org

WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 10, 2016) — Save the Children today praised passage of the bipartisan Global Food Security Act of 2016 (S.1252) by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The bill, introduced by global food security and nutrition champions Senators Johnny Isakson (R-GA) and Robert P. Casey Jr. (D-PA), represents strong bipartisan cooperation to maintain U.S. leadership in combating global hunger and malnutrition for nearly 800 million children and families worldwide.

We thank Chairman Bob Corker (R-TN) and Ranking Member Ben Cardin (D-MD) for their leadership and support in making this bill stronger than ever and look forward to supporting members of the Senate to expedite the bill to the floor for final passage.

"Final passage of the Global Food Security Act will be a major step toward ensuring the U.S. government continues to be a leader in ending hunger and malnutrition by 2030,” said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. “The focus on nutrition and the critical 1,000 day window from pregnancy through a child's second birthday is a game-changer in terms of helping millions of children to reach their full potential."

The Global Food Security Act requires the U.S. government to pursue a comprehensive, whole-of-government strategy that leverages all U.S. investments in global food and nutrition security to achieve the greatest impact. The bill covers the full spectrum of global food security needs from responding to emergency food crises to investing in long-term development programs that address the underlying causes of chronic hunger and malnutrition.

U.S. efforts to reduce global poverty, hunger and malnutritionhelp to stabilize situations that can become threats to our national security. They also reduce the risk of chronic malnutrition and child stunting, which can impact not only a child’s ability to survive and thrive but also the productive future of a country-reducing a country’s Gross Domestic Product by as much as 16 percent. This bill will help create a better, safer world for children everywhere.

Save the Children is proud to be part of a broad-based effort to pass the Global Food Security Act that includes not only NGOs, but also the private sector. “This is an issue that everyone can get behind; that’s why we’ve seen such strong bipartisan support for this bill and are hopeful that it will become law this year,” noted Miles.

Save the Children invests in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. In the United States and around the world, we give children a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Save the Children Reports Findings from Focus Groups with Families Living Under Siege

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (March 8, 2016) — A new report from Save the Children reveals in shocking detail the horror of family life in cities and towns under siege in Syria. The report estimates that more than 250,000 children have been in constant fear for their lives for many months in Syria's besieged areas. Parents testify to not only dealing with the psychological impact on children terrified of explosions, but the dire consequences of being deprived of food, basic medicine and clean water.

Recent moves to increase aid to besieged areas are welcome, but deliveries have been found to be ad-hoc, piecemeal and often stripped of vital supplies including medical equipment.

More than 125 mothers, fathers and children living under siege were interviewed in 22 focus groups for the report, "Childhood Under Siege", which is released today ahead of the five year mark of the war in Syria. In every group interviewed, children said they live in constant fear of attack and parents said their children's behavior had changed – becoming more withdrawn, aggressive or depressed.

Their testimony painted a shocking picture of daily life in Syria's besieged towns. Health staff reported operating by candlelight, running out of medicine, and sick babies dying at checkpoints because of delays in reaching medical care. Children are being forced to eat boiled leaves and animal feed for their one daily meal and teachers say they are setting up schools in basements to protect students from bombs. Residents described how snipers try to shoot at anyone who leaves, trapping the population in an open-air prison.

"Fear has taken control. Children now wait for their turn to be killed. Even adults live only to wait for their turn to die," said Rihab*, a mother in Eastern Ghouta.

Over the last six months attacks appear to be getting worse. New information suggests that barrel bombs are dropped on besieged areas more than any other part of Syria and that this trend increased significantly in the second half of 2015. Attacks include the shelling of a playground in Al Wa'er in September where dozens of children were playing and airstrikes which killed at least 29 children in Eastern Ghouta in two weeks in December alone.

Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children U.S. said: "Children are dying from lack of food and medicine in parts of Syria just a few kilometres from warehouses that are piled high with aid supplies. They are paying the price for the world's inaction.

"Families interviewed for this report spoke of sick babies dying at checkpoints, vets treating humans and children forced to eat animal feed as they cower in basements from airstrikes. Enough is enough. After nearly five years of conflict in Syria, it's time to end the sieges."

Hassan*, a father from Deir Ezzor, said: "When the shelling was happening my children were terrified… I saw four children that were hit by the bombs. It was so tragic, I couldn't even watch what was happening. Some children lost their limbs."

The focus groups, which were conducted this year in eight besieged areas, found widespread and deadly deprivation of food, clean water, medicine and healthcare:

  • In all but one of the adult focus groups (16 out of 17) people reported that children in their community had died from lack of medicine or access to healthcare.
  • In every group respondents said they had to cut the number of meals they eat per day by at least half.
  • In four groups, people said children there had died from malnutrition and hunger-related causes.

Despite the UN Security Council passing six resolutions since 2014 calling for unobstructed humanitarian access in Syria – one every four months – the number of people living under siege has more than doubled in the last year. The recent efforts to deliver aid into some of the hardest-hit areas are welcome, but they have delivered only a tiny fraction of what is needed. Some vital medicines, fuel and high nutrition food are being removed from convoys, and people are still not allowed to leave for medical treatment. Until full access is granted, life-saving supplies will not reach everyone who desperately needs them.

The primary responsibility for the suffering of Syria's children lies with the parties to the conflict – Save the Children calls on them to end the sieges and immediately allow unfettered and permanent access for humanitarian aid to all areas, and to end attacks on schools, hospitals and other vital civilian infrastructure.

There is also much more the international community should be doing to save the lives of Syria's besieged children. They must hold all parties to the conflict accountable, to ensure full and unobstructed access to areas currently under siege. We also ask world leaders to decouple humanitarian relief from peace talks and stop using aid as a bargaining chip for political negotiations.

*Names have been changed for protection

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Cyclone Winston

Photo: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response/Jeff Schmaltz

Washington, D.C. (February 22, 2016) — As vital aid reaches communities devastated by Cyclone Winston, thousands of Fijians are left stranded in evacuation centers, uncertain about when they will return home.

Entire villages have been flattened by the mega storm, which packed winds of up to 200 miles per hour and is widely regarded as the strongest storm ever recorded in the southern hemisphere.

Eighty percent of the population is estimated to be without power, and water sources and hospitals have also been damaged. Save the Children says that along with meeting immediate needs like food, water and shelter, the wellbeing of vulnerable children in evacuation centers must be prioritized.

Schools will not reopen for at least a week, with some being used as evacuation centers. There are more than 80 evacuation centers still operating across the country, in schools and other community buildings, and some are hosting as many as 300 children.

"There is a very real need for child protection services in these evacuation centers to ensure the wellbeing of children," said Iris Low-McKenzie CEO of Save the Children Fiji.

Part of Save the Children's emergency response will include setting up "child friendly spaces" at evacuation centers, which will provide children with a safe place to be engaged in educational play with other children, while giving parents a much-needed opportunity to go out and assess the damage.

At the same time, the death toll from Cyclone Winston continues to mount—current assessments report 21 people have been confirmed to have died so far, including two children, ages 10 and 12.

"This is an enormous tragedy in Fiji. Our nation has never faced anything like this before, and we still don't know the full extent of the storm's impact," Ms. Low-McKenzie said. "What we do know is that the recovery process will take many, many months as families who have lost their homes and livelihoods slowly rebuild. Organizations like Save the Children will be doing our best to support these families."

Save the Children has been working in Fiji since 1974 providing education and children protection services. The aid agency has stockpiled emergency supplies to ensure children can return to school as soon as possible. This includes school bags, classroom kits and child friendly spaces kits for evacuation centers if schools are damaged.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Claire Garmirian 203.309.8545 (M)
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Cyclone Winston

Photo: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response/Jeff Schmaltz

Washington, D.C. (February 20, 2016) — Cyclone Winston made landfall on the main island of Fiji today with estimated top wind speeds of 195 miles per hour. It is thought to be the strongest storm ever recorded in the southern hemisphere, and initially made landfall on the island of Vitu Levu. The cyclone is reported to have caused flash flooding on the nation’s outer islands, including Vanua Levu.

In advance of the storm the Fijian government issued a list of 758 evacuation centers across the nation where people could take shelter, and they have now announced a state of emergency. The damage caused by the cyclone is yet to be ascertained, but it has been reported that local authorities have deployed assessment teams to the affected areas.

Save the Children has stockpiled emergency supplies to ensure children can get back to school as soon as possible. This includes school bags, classroom kits and child friendly spaces kits for evacuation centers if schools are damaged.

"This mega-storm has the potential to cause catastrophic damage across Fiji, an island nation frequented by hundreds of thousands of holiday-goers every year," Save the Children Fiji CEO Iris Low-McKenzie said.

"We’re extremely concerned about the impact this will have on children, who are particularly vulnerable during emergencies," said Ms. Low-McKenzie. "We have teams standing by to assess the storm damage, as well as teachers preparing to support children in emergency centers."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Claire Garmirian 203.309.8545 (M)
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Cyclone Winston

Photo: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response/Jeff Schmaltz

Washington, D.C. (February 20, 2016) —Save the Children is bracing for the worst and a keeping focus on children’s wellbeing as the scale of devastation emerges following the most powerful cyclone ever to hit Fiji.

One death has been confirmed so far, and thousands of homes are likely to have been destroyed. Cyclone Winston packed winds of up to 202 miles per hour, snapping tree trunks in half, damaging key infrastructure and bending metal power poles.

"I’ve never experienced anything like this. The noise was frightening as roofs were blown off homes and trees were ripped out by their roots," said Save the Children Fiji CEO Iris Low-McKenzie.

"I’m especially concerned about the remote communities in outlying areas that we haven’t been able to contact yet. Until communications are re-established and we can assess the damage, we won’t know the full extent of situation.

"What we do know is that this mega storm will have had a massive impact on children, and their needs and wellbeing will be among the highest priorities in the coming days and weeks."

Save the Children has teams standing by to assess the damage once the curfew lifts, and teachers ready to support children at set up child-friendly spaces in evacuation centers. The organization will operate special playgroups for children staying in some of the 700-plus evacuation centers across the country. The ‘child-friendly space’ provides children with a safe and fun place to spend time while giving parents the much needed opportunity to assess the damage.

Meanwhile, aid workers from Save the Children globally are gearing up to deploy to the worst-affected areas. The aid agency has launched an urgent appeal for funds to help reach thousands of children through education and child protection activities.

"The situation in Fiji is critical, and will be for some time. The island nation has never been hit by a storm like this before, and will need a lot of help to recover," Ms. Low-McKenzie said."Right now it's important that the international community unites behind Fiji, and urgently helps fund the emergency response."

Save the Children has stockpiled emergency supplies to ensure children return to school as soon as possible. This includes school bags, classroom kits and child friendly spaces kits for evacuation centers if schools are damaged.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (February 16, 2016) — In response to yesterday's attacks on healthcare facilities in Syria, Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children U.S. says:

"Save the Children is appalled by the growing trend for health facilities, schools and other civilian infrastructure to be the targets of deadly attacks in Syria.

"Monday was the worst day for attacks on healthcare facilities for more than six months. New information gathered by Save the Children and other organizations suggests that in total, seven facilities were bombed in air strikes, more than was first reported. The attacks happened across Syria, in Aleppo, Idlib and Dara'a provinces.

"These assaults have left thousands of already vulnerable people living in war-ravaged areas without access to healthcare. Initial reports suggest that on average more than 23,000 people used these hospitals and clinics each month, with 550 babies being delivered monthly. It's not clear when these facilities will be able to re-open, if they will be able to function again at all.

"Brave Syrian health workers work under incredibly difficult and dangerous conditions every day to save the lives of others. To have seven health facilities bombed in air strikes on one single day, destroying hospitals which are a life-line to the local population and killing health workers and patients, is indefensible. Protection of civilians should be the utmost priority; we cannot tolerate that families, and children in particular, are killed in places where they should be safe.

It is particularly saddening that this strike comes right after world leaders had announced an agreement for a cessation of hostilities in Syria. Parties to the conflict are not respecting their obligation to spare civilians. We call on all parties to agree to cease hostilities and immediately restart peace negotiations."



Sales of T-shirts Inspired by the Singer’s Blood-Drawn Heart Supporting Save the Children in Providing Emergency Relief to Kids in Crisis

Enrique Iglesias Valentine

#Heartsfromkids: Kindergartners with their handmade valentines for Enrique Iglesias. Photo by Denvie Balidoy

Enrique Iglesias Valentine

Sweet surprise: Save the Children's Carlos Carrazana surprises Enrique Iglesias with valentines from kids in Save the Children's Filipino programs. Photo by Susan Warner

Media Contact
Jeremy Soulliere 203.295.5842 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (February 12, 2016) — Grammy Award-winning artist Enrique Iglesias received a sweet pre-Valentine’s Day surprise from Save the Children today, just before he finished a pair of recent concerts. The global nonprofit presented the pop star with handmade valentines from children in Typhoon Haiyan-affected communities in the Philippines to show appreciation for the #Hearts4Kids project for kids in crises.

Teaming up with Save the Children last fall, Iglesias launched a #Hearts4Kids T-shirt to support the non-profit's Children's Emergency Fund, which allows Save the Children to pre-position lifesaving supplies before an emergency hits, respond immediately to a crisis, and do whatever it takes to protect the lives of children and create a sense of normalcy. All net proceeds from the purchase of a #Hearts4Kids T-shirt, or $12, goes to the fund.

"Disasters like Typhoon Haiyan can take a tremendous toll on children. Yet, when given the proper care and support from their families and communities, children can pick up the pieces in their lives and move forward," said Carlos Carrazana, COO of Save the Children."That is why the fund is so valuable. It allows Save the Children to prepare communities and help children to better weather the next storm."

The design of the T-shirt was inspired by the heart Iglesias drew on his bloodstained T-shirt after injuring his hand on a drone during his concert in Tijuana, Mexico last year. Iglesias' fans are able to snatch up a special shirt at certain concert venues, or can purchase the shirt with a few clicks online at www.enriqueiglesias.com.

Iglesias' #Hearts4kids partnership with Save the Children has brought in $25,000 to date for kids in crises, including funds raised from T-shirt sales and contributions from Iglesias and his fans.

Representatives from the nonprofit gave Iglesias his special Valentine's thank you right before his concert tonight.

"I am honored to receive these hopeful messages from children in the Philippines," said Enrique Iglesias, whose mother hails from The Philippines, upon receiving the valentines from Save the Children. "My fans have embraced this project in more ways than I could have imagined, and their generosity is going to make a big difference for kids in crises."

Save the Children is responding to 50 humanitarian emergencies worldwide, including the Nepal earthquake, the conflict in Syria and the migrant crisis in Europe. In 2014, the agency directly reached nearly 6 million children through its humanitarian response work.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Brendan Daly 646.520.7203 (M)

Washington, D.C. (February 10, 2016) — The release of President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2017 (FY17) budget yesterday sent a mixed signal on the prospects for continued progress for mothers and children around the world. Save the Children applauded the proposed increases in the Maternal and Child Health account, but the overall International Affairs budget declined slightly, and some accounts vital to the well-being of women and children across the globe took significant cuts.

“We commend the Administration’s support for the Maternal and Child Health account and its evidence-based interventions that result in real impact,” said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. “But we also note the complementarity of investments in nutrition, humanitarian response, and food security. Cuts to these vital programs threaten the well-being of mothers and children around the globe -- and take us further from a world where every child has a chance to survive and thrive.”

Indeed, the President’s budget provides $814.5 million for the Maternal and Child Health account, a $64.5 million (or 8.6%) increase from the FY16 omnibus. The budget, however, also includes $108.5 million for nutrition, a decrease of $16.5 million (or 13.2%) from the FY16 omnibus. With malnutrition a contributing factor to 45% of deaths among children under 5, this proposed cut to the nutrition account would impact the potential of children around the world. Strong investments in both accounts are needed to meet the shared goal of ending preventable maternal and child deaths by 2030.

“We can end preventable child deaths around the world in our lifetime,” noted Mark Shriver, President of the Save the Children Action Network, “but only if we accelerate the incredible progress to date. Now is not the time to cut back on fighting malnutrition – which is a cause in almost half of all deaths of kids under 5.”

Moreover, despite the rise in the number of crises unfolding around the globe, the President’s budget proposes funding of almost $1.1 billion less than last year’s funding levels. With ongoing crises affecting children around the world in places like Syria, Yemen, and Ethiopia, the U.S. should be stepping up its commitment to humanitarian response programs that save lives in regions plagued by conflicts and food crises.

“Humanitarian assistance programs protect children in times of crisis when they are at their most vulnerable,” said Carolyn Miles. “We have more people displaced from their homes than at any time in human history; we can’t turn our backs on these kids.” Save the Children did welcome the President’s continued request for more flexibility to address the complex food emergencies in the protracted crisis in the Middle East and needs elsewhere that cannot be addressed through the delivery of in-kind food commodities. The Administration estimated this would enable them to reach an additional 2 million people who need help.

Increasingly, the entire international affairs budget seems to be in a precarious position as more of the core funding shifts out of the base account. The past few years have seen the growth of the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding and the decline of the core enduring International Affairs budget. Using OCO as a work-around to the cuts imposed on the International Affairs budget has had the short-term effect of preserving U.S. funding to critical crises and other emergencies. However, OCO now represents slightly less than one-third of the International Affairs budget. Given that OCO was only intended as a temporary stopgap, significant concerns exist about the viability of this option in the coming years.

With challenges around the globe, now isn’t the time to let up on U.S. international engagement and funding for accounts impacting mothers and children.

At Save the Children Action Network, we are the voice for kids. We believe that every child deserves the best start in life. That’s why we’re building bipartisan will and voter support to make sure every child in the U.S. has access to high-quality early learning and why we’re working to end preventable deaths for moms and kids around the world. By investing in kids and holding leaders accountable, we are helping kids from birth to age 5 survive and thrive.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



After more than a decade of disasters, little change in disaster preparedness

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.247.6610 (M) 202.640.6647 (O)

New York, N.Y. (February 9, 2016) — Today, the National Center for Disaster Preparedness (NCDP) at Columbia University’s Earth Institute releases results from its national survey of American households to determine the current state of opinions and attitudes on preparedness for children in disasters and their community. The survey is part of the Resilient Children/Resilient Communities Initiative which is led by the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University's Earth Institute and Save the Children, and funded by a grant from GSK. For the event homepage and to join the live webinar at 12:00 PM EST, please go to http://bit.ly/rcrcdata16.

Key findings include:

  • Nearly two thirds (65%) of American households do not have adequate plans and supplies for a disaster. This is virtually unchanged from 2011 (66%) and represents only a modest improvement from since 2003 (77%).
  • 41% are not confident that their community has adequate plans in place for a disaster that occurs with no warning, a slight improvement from 2011 (47%).
  • 51% are not confident in the ability of government to meet the needs of children in a disaster and 37% are not confident in their community's ability to meet the needs of children.
  • 35% of households with children are not familiar with their schools' evacuation and emergency plans, and 41% do not know to what location their children would be evacuated.

The survey also identified that while Americans are generally less prepared and less confident in the response of government, they still have high expectations for a quick response and recovery when disasters do strike.

Dr. Irwin Redlener, Director of NCDP and Professor, Health Policy and Management, Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, said "We are experiencing a continuous increase in the number of extreme weather events, and 10 years after Hurricane Katrina and three years after Superstorm Sandy, the vast majority of Americans remain unprepared for major disasters." According to Dr. Redlener, "What we've also found is that many parents are not confident that their children would be protected and are not aware of what plans schools have made to be sure that children are safe in case of a catastrophic event in their community. This should be a wake-up call for elected officials and policy makers."

"This survey provides important insights into public perceptions and expectations in a disaster," said Jeff Schlegelmilch, NCDP Deputy Director and the study's Principal Investigator. "Emergency planners at all levels should take note of these findings, and see them as an opportunity to re-think how we engage families and children-serving institutions in preparedness," he added.

"The survey conducted by the National Center for Disaster Preparedness shows how underprepared we are to protect children in disasters," said Erin Bradshaw, Senior Director, Emergency Preparedness for Save the Children. "Unless we make child-focused preparedness a priority, in our homes, schools and communities, we are putting our youngest, most vulnerable citizens in jeopardy. There are simple things we can do as parents and caregivers — identifying emergency contacts, making a plan and talking to children about that plan — that can ultimately help keep boys and girls safe."

The survey was administered as a random digital dial survey of 1,048 households across the United States and was conducted between November 30, 2015 and December 14, 2015. This national survey builds on prior surveys deployed by NCDP as part of the American Preparedness Project (http://ncdp.columbia.edu/research/preparedness-attitudes-behaviors/).

Work is currently underway to address community preparedness with specific focus on the needs of children. The Resilient Children/Resilient Communities Initiative will develop a replicable model of child-focused community resilience planning that can be brought to national scale. This is being accomplished by developing two pilot programs in counties in New York and Arkansas and establishing a national panel of experts to link the community work with national preparedness priorities. The Resilient Children/Resilient Communities Initiative, led by the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University's Earth Institute and Save the Children, is funded by a grant from GSK. For more information, please visit http://ncdp.columbia.edu/rcrc.

About Save the Children

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

About NCDP

The National Center for Disaster Preparedness at the Earth Institute works to understand and improve the nation’s capacity to prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters. NCDP focuses on the readiness of governmental and non-governmental systems; the complexities of population recovery; the power of community engagement; and the risks of human vulnerability, with a particular focus on children. For more information, please visit http://ncdp.columbia.edu/.

About GSK

GSK, one of the world’s leading research-based pharmaceutical and healthcare companies, is committed to improving the quality of human life by enabling people to do more, feel better and live longer. For further information, go to us.gsk.com, follow us on twitter.com/GSKUS or visit our blog at www.morethanmedicine.us.gsk.com/blog/.



Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Washington, D.C. (February 10, 2016) — The international community has just three weeks to provide $245 million in emergency food aid to help prevent a potentially catastrophic escalation in severe acute malnutrition cases in drought-afflicted parts of Ethiopia from the end of April when the main 'hungry season' begins. This drought is affecting communities throughout the Horn of Africa, from Somalia to Eritrea.

"The situation here is as grave as I have ever seen it in the 19 years I have spent in Ethiopia and we now only have a tiny fraction of time for the international community to help to stop this," warns Save the Children Ethiopia Country Director John Graham. "It can take around 120 days to purchase and transport food into Ethiopia through Djibouti– if these emergency funds do not arrive in time, there is no question that there will be a critical fracture in the food aid supply pipeline during the main 'hungry season' which peaks in August"

Ethiopia continues to endure the devastating impacts of its worst drought in 50 years, which has already left a staggering 10.2 million people in need of emergency food assistance, including 6 million children. More than 400,000 children will need urgent supplementary feeding for severe acute malnutrition this year - a condition that can lead to physical stunting and mental development delays. Additionally, at least 1.7 million children and pregnant and lactating women are suffering from moderate acute malnutrition, and are at risk of sliding into further crisis if the food pipeline breaks down.

"In 2016, when we have all the right systems in place to prevent a massive humanitarian disaster, it would be absolutely unforgivable if the international community failed to act. We all said 'never again' after the tragedy of 1984, and again after the famine in Somalia in 2011 – so now is crunch time and we must all step up before it's too late."

Despite early warnings, UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon's call for urgent support has not been met. Currently, the combined Ethiopian Government and UN Appeal for $1.4 billion to combat the impact of the drought remains less than half funded.

"The Ethiopian government has shouldered much of the financial burden so far, but if they don't get more immediate help from foreign donors they may be forced to redirect funding from other vital areas, including education and maternal and child health programs, in order to buy life-saving food aid," says Mr. Graham.

A series of failed rainy seasons triggered by the El Nino weather system has devastated food production and livelihoods across vast swathes of the country, causing food crops to fail, livestock to perish, and severe water shortages leaving 5.8 million people in need of urgent access to drinking water.

In many drought-affected areas, dried up wells, springs and rivers have led to a sharp increase in chronic skin conditions such as scabies, with ever-worsening dehydration weakening people's health and leaving them vulnerable to communicable diseases.

"Families should not be put in a position where they need to make heartbreaking decisions about what they use precious water for – to drink and cook with, or to bathe their children and prevent the spread of disease," adds Mr. Graham.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Sales of T-shirts Inspired by the Singer’s Blood-Drawn Heart will Support Save the Children in Providing Lifesaving Emergency Relief

Hurricane Patricia

Enrique Iglesias sporting his new "heart" T-shirt. All net proceeds from sales of the T-shirt will go to help kids in times of crises.Photo: Al Silfen

Fairfield, Conn. (Feb. 8, 2016) —

Next Thursday and Friday Enrique will be in Connecticut doing two shows at Foxwoods. This is near Save The Children’s US headquarters so we are going to do something special for them.

On WEDNESDAY FEB. 10 at 6 PM EST, Enrique will be teaming up with Kiss 95.7 for a special Twitter Chat to help raise money for Save The Children. To participate just send your tweets to @kiss957 and @enriqueiglesias with #EnriqueFoxwoods. Make sure to tag our moderator @kiss957 and check out some of the things you can do to get your tweet recognized.

Things You Can Include To Improve Your Chances Of Getting A Tweet From Enrique:

  • Tweet the link to buy a Heart Shirt or make a donation to Save The Children - http://bit.ly/hearts4kids
  • Tweet a picture in your Save The Children Heart Shirt
  • Tweet a picture of your Heart Shirt or donation receipt to Save The Children
  • Include @SaveTheChildren in your Tweet
  • Tweet a picture of your tickets or your ticket receipt to Foxwoods
  • Tweet the link to buy tickets to Foxwoods - http://bit.ly/enriquefoxwoods

Also make sure to follow: @enriqueiglesias @kiss957 @SaveTheChildren & @FoxwoodsCT

Want To Meet Enrique At Foxwoods?

For those attending the shows at Foxwoods (Feb. 11 & 12) , WEAR YOUR SAVE THE CHILDREN HEART TSHIRT. 2 lucky fans who are wearing their shirt at the show will be selected randomly BEFORE THE SHOW to go backstage to meet Enrique and take a picture.

Heart Shirts will be available for purchase at the merch booths of the show.

Buy tickets to Foxwoods at : http://bit.ly/enriquefoxwoods

Save the Children invests in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. In the United States and around the world, we give children a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Syria children out of schoolMatt Crossick/Save the Children

Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (February 4, 2016) — As a major Syria conference starts today in London, new analysis from Save the Children reveals that since the conflict started in March 2011, an average of 3,245 children have been forced to leave their homes every day.

The organization is urging world leaders meeting in London to step up and prevent a lost generation of children in the Middle East. The total number of children who are now displaced, either within Syria or as refugees in the region, stands at 5.8 million – more than the entire populations of Colorado or Maryland.

Children are also being denied one of their most important rights: education. A few years ago, nearly 100 percent of children in Syria were in school, and now around one in four schools are damaged, destroyed or occupied, and in parts of the country school enrollment is now as low as 6 percent. In total, there are 2.8 million Syrian children out of school within Syria itself and in neighboring countries.

Education, in particular, is an area where the leaders meeting in London could achieve real results. Save the Children is calling on the conference delegates to:

  • Close the education funding gap by committing $1.4 billion per year to the sector.
  • Put policies in place that guarantee access to education, such as allowing refugee children to go to school regardless of their legal status and giving parents the chance to earn a living so their children can continue their education.
  • Take measures to put pressure on the parties to the conflict to protect students, teachers and schools from attack.

Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children US said: "For almost half a decade now, Syria's children have faced not only displacement and denial of education, but barrel bombs, shelling, hunger and disease. Despite the challenges and the ferocity of the war, we have a real opportunity at this conference to make a significant difference in their lives.

"Our message to leaders meeting today and the international community is simple: every child should have the opportunity to learn. We cannot stand by and accept that we may see a lost generation of Syrian children who have never had the chance to go to school."

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Jeremy Soulliere 203.295.5842 (M)

Conshohocken, Penn. (January 15, 2016) — More than 12 million children in over 46 countries have better schools, teachers and learning materials, thanks to a 13 year partnership between the IKEA Foundation, Save the Children and UNICEF.

Since 2003, the IKEA Foundation's "Soft Toys for Education" campaign has contributed $97.7 million (€88 million)* to Save the Children and UNICEF, helping to increase school attendance for some of the world's most marginalized and vulnerable children. Funds have also helped train teachers, provide educational materials and improve child protection systems in schools and communities.

During this year's campaign, which ran from November 1 through December 26, 2015, the U.S. alone raised over $1.4 million through soft toys, IKEA FAMILY children's books and card games sales.

"Education is the most solid road leading out of poverty. All children have the right to an education but still too many are left behind. Partnering with UNICEF and Save the Children for 13 years has allowed us to address this issue strategically and invest in improving the quality of education in some of the world's poorest communities—and we're incredibly grateful to the IKEA customers and co-workers who have worked so hard to make that right a reality for over 12 million children," said Per Heggenes, CEO IKEA Foundation.

In Ethiopia, funds from the IKEA Foundation have helped UNICEF reach children in rural farming communities with basic education. The flexible schooling model has been so successful that the Ethiopian government has rolled it out nationally.

"Over the last 13 years, the incredible support of the IKEA Foundation and IKEA employees and customers has been invaluable in helping UNICEF transform the lives of the world's most vulnerable children through education," said Caryl M. Stern, President and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF. "Thanks to this partnership, millions of children around the world will have the opportunity to receive a quality education and build a better and brighter future for themselves and their communities."

In China, IKEA Foundation funding helped develop early-childhood development centers for disadvantaged children living in selected rural communities. The impact of these centers on children's lives contributed to the Government of China's decision to universalize preschool education.

With the support of the IKEA Foundation, Save the Children has worked in 17 countries in Asia and Europe to provide educational opportunities for previously out-of-school children, to improve the learning environment and to train teachers on child-centered, nonviolent and inclusive teaching methodology.

"With the help of the "Soft Toys for Education" campaign, Save the Children is creating a better and brighter future for children – giving the most vulnerable kids access to learning, and teachers the tools to provide a better quality education," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "We are extremely thankful for our partnership with the IKEA Foundation, and all the support we've received from IKEA employees and customers the past 13 years. Together we have made an enormous difference in the lives of children."

In Bangladesh, the Philippines and Vietnam, Save the Children has, together with education authorities and civil society organizations, supported policy reform and practices to ensure that children from minority groups learn in a language they understand.

Although the Soft Toys for Education campaign has ended its successful run, the IKEA Foundation will continue its commitment to UNICEF and Save the Children through ongoing grants in Eastern Europe, sub-Saharan Africa and Asia in the areas of education, early-childhood care and development, child protection, adolescence and humanitarian response.

Through the IKEA IWitness program, IKEA co-workers get to see first-hand how the campaigns they support create a better everyday life for children and their families in developing countries.

*For every soft toy, children's book and card game sold, the IKEA Foundation donated one euro ($1.11)** to UNICEF and Save the Children to train teachers, improve child-protection systems, provide educational materials, and increase school attendance in some of the world's poorest communities.

** Dollar to Euro calculated at $1.11, August 31, 2015

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (January 14, 2016) — Led by an international development consortium that includes Save the Children, YouthSave has shown helping youth build savings can significantly increase their financial capability and may also improve other youth development outcomes, such as cognitive functioning, education, and health behaviors.

Through the project – the largest research experiment of its kind in the developing world – more than 130,000 young people, aged primarily 12-18 and half living under the poverty line, collectively saved more than $1 million over three years. In addition, approximately 44,000 youth received direct financial education, 48,000 individuals were reached through community-level events, and an estimated 660,000 were reached through mass media.

Ann Miles, director of Financial Inclusion and Youth Livelihoods at The MasterCard Foundation, said that at the time the project was launched, “many thought that low-income young people couldn’t save money. YouthSave found out that they can.” She added, “The Foundation believes that all young people deserve the opportunity to build assets, gain financial knowledge, and develop sound financial habits. It is our hope that the knowledge generated in YouthSave will find a wide audience. We also hope that many others will be inspired to expand quality financial services to young people, and to build the industry knowledge base along the way.”

Created in partnership with The MasterCard Foundation, YouthSave was led by Save the Children with the Center for Social Development at Washington University in St. Louis, New America, and the Consultative Group to Assist the Poor. Between 2010 and 2015, YouthSave investigated the potential of youth-focused savings accounts as tools for youth development and financial inclusion in developing countries.

Conducting pre- and post-tests to evaluate effectiveness of financial education activities in Colombia, Kenya, and Nepal, researchers found statistically significant improvements in participants’ values related to saving, attitudes towards banks, and knowledge about the more technical aspects of saving and budgeting. In Ghana, YouthSave conducted a “gold standard” randomized controlled trial of the opportunity to open a savings account on youth development outcomes. Participants demonstrated a higher sense of security of educational aspirations compared to nonparticipants, and reported an increase of 17 minutes in their out-of-school study time. The project had mixed effects on health attitudes, but participants showed positive results on perceived barriers to condom use and an increased awareness of susceptibility to and severity of HIV.

YouthSave also identified multiple ways in which account features can affect savings behavior among young people. Not requiring an initial deposit may facilitate uptake, but is associated with higher rates of account dormancy. Accounts with features that encourage parental involvement were tied to greater savings accumulation; and younger children had a greater average monthly net savings than their older counterparts. Sending youth behavior nudges to save through SMS messages was associated with an increase in net account balances.

Researchers found that bank policies and regulations had a direct effect on the extent and nature of youth financial inclusion. To ensure widespread access to formal youth savings services, an enabling regulatory environment is critical. In Nepal, where the age of majority is 16, 42 percent of the account holders owned and operated their accounts. In Kenya, flexibility in the partner bank’s policies allowed “trusted adults” to be co-signatories on minors’ accounts, a regulatory policy already allowed in Ghana. In Kenya and Ghana, non-relatives were co-signatories on 56 percent and 47 percent of accounts, respectively.

For financial institutions, YouthSave assessed the business case for offering youth savings products and services. The program concluded that youth savings are compelling for a financial institution’s medium- to long-term strategy, but there may not be an immediate business case for these low-margin products. Over a longer time horizon, offering youth savings accounts could usher benefits related to capturing a future client base early on, the possibility of cross-selling to young people’s networks, and fulfilling corporate social responsibilities. Nevertheless, youth savings programs will likely require internal or external subsidies in the short-term, especially to reach the most marginalized youth.

“Helping young people build savings can not only improve their individual-level outcomes but also help achieve national-level financial inclusion,” said YouthSave Project Director Rani Deshpande. “But extending the benefits of savings to all youth, including the most marginalized, will take the concerted collaboration financial institutions, nonprofits, government, and donors.”

To learn more about YouthSave, visit: www.newamerica.org/youthsave/

For YouthSave in brief, visit: www.newamerica.org/youthsave/key-findings-from-the-youthsave-project-in-brief/

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati

Washington, D.C. (January 12, 2016) — Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles is in Ethiopia this week to see the impacts of the code red food crisis in the Horn of Africa caused by the worst drought in 50 years. She is reviewing joint efforts by the Ethiopian government and its global partners to get food, water, and medicine where it's urgently needed.

More than 80 percent of Ethiopia's population depends on rain-fed agriculture, and the number of Ethiopians in critical need of food assistance has skyrocketed from 3 to 10 million in just one year due largely to severe drought caused by El Nino.

Miles is available tomorrow morning (Wednesday, Eastern Time) to discuss by phone from Ethiopia what she’s seeing on the ground.

If interested in arranging an interview, please contact Negin Janati: njanati@savechildren.org or by phone 203.212.0044

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Negin Janati 203.212.0044 (M)

Fairfield, Conn. (January 11, 2016) — International aid agencies working in Syria today expressed relief that a convoy of food aid and other first need items was finally allowed into Madaya where people have been dying of starvation. Aid is also today being delivered to other besieged areas including Fua'a and Kafraya. Agencies warned however that only a complete end to the six-month old siege and guarantees for sustained aid deliveries alongside humanitarian services will alleviate the crisis in these areas.

Madaya's estimated 42,000 inhabitants have been trapped with limited basic supplies and food prices rising astronomically every day. Today's delivery will provide food for up to a month, according to the UN, but agencies warn that this one off permission to deliver will be insufficient given the current shocking reported levels of malnutrition. Doctors in the town say that people's average nutritional intake has fallen to 0.5 percent of what is needed, and local aid agencies report that more than 50 people have already died of starvation and lack of medical care. Civilians are still not allowed to move in or out of besieged areas, with accounts from people inside Madaya that at least eight people died while trying to smuggle food inside. The town's last functioning hospital faces severe shortages of medical supplies with dozens of patients left to their fate.

Madaya is one of 15 areas across Syria under siege, with inhabitants restricted from leaving and aid workers blocked from bringing in food, medicine, fuel and other supplies. The eight agencies call for all parties to the conflict to end the siege of civilian areas and ensure permanent humanitarian access, as provided for in UN Security Council Resolution 2258. Right now, more than 4.5 million people in Syria live in besieged or hard to reach areas. People in these areas also desperately need assistance and protection, yet access to them keeps deteriorating.

CARE International, Handicap International, International Rescue Committee, Norwegian Refugee Council, Oxfam, Save the Children, Syria Relief and Development, World Vision

For interviews and further information please contact: Alun McDonald, Save the Children, +962 791 799 287

Save the Children invests in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. In the United States and around the world, we give children a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Media@savechildren.org

Fairfield, Conn. (January 7, 2016) — More children will die in the coming days and weeks unless food, medicine, fuel and other vital aid is immediately allowed into the besieged Syrian town of Madaya, Save the Children warns.

Humanitarian workers on the ground report that at least 31 people in the town have died from malnutrition-related causes in the month of December, including three infant children under one year old. Three unborn children have allegedly died as their mothers were severely malnourished and health workers report an increase in cases of Hepatitis A and skin diseases.

Severe food shortages have pushed the price of essentials such as rice, sugar and bulgur wheat to astronomical levels. Yesterday the cost of bulgur reached $280 per kilogram, according to Save the Children partners in Madaya.

Without electricity and fuel for generators, people are struggling to survive the bitter winter temperatures, which have now plummeted below zero. Small children and babies are particularly vulnerable in these conditions, particularly when they are malnourished.

Carolyn Miles, Save the Children president and CEO, said: “Food is being used as a weapon of war in Madaya and other besieged areas, and children are paying the price. It is appalling to see civilians being made to suffer in this way. Local humanitarian workers in the town are desperate to help, but they themselves have run out of food and medical supplies. If aid does not reach Madaya soon, we know that more children will die needlessly.”

Around 42,000 people in Madaya have been under siege since July 2015. Only one limited convoy of food has been allowed in since then, with no food, medicine or fuel allowed in at all since mid-October. At that time, local doctors said there were already more than 1,000 cases of malnutrition of children under the age of one, and this number is likely to have risen significantly since the siege intensified. People are prevented from moving in or out, and residents report that checkpoints, landmines and snipers surround the town.

Families are rationing the limited food available, with many getting just 5-800 kilocalories per day – sometimes just a quarter of the recommended minimum daily amount. Markets are now empty, with some people now so desperate they are forced to eat cat or dog meat and leaves from trees.

Save the Children is calling for an immediate end to the siege of Madaya and other besieged areas across Syria, so that food, medicine, fuel and other aid can enter. Assurances must be given that civilians throughout Syria will have freedom of movement and free access to the humanitarian assistance that they require.

Save the Children gives children in the United States and around the world a healthy start, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We invest in childhood — every day, in times of crisis and for our future. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.


Cristiano Ronaldo Sends Message of Hope, Along With Life-Saving Aid, to Syrian Children - December 23, 2016

Philippines Braces for Powerful Christmas Day Typhoon, Winds Over 110 mph Expected - December 23, 2016

Mongolia Calls for International Help as Harsh Winter Dzud Plunges Temperatures Below -58 - December 21, 2016

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