2012 Press Releases

Media Contacts
Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)
Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843

WESTPORT, Conn. (Dec. 27, 2012) - The old adage goes, you can’t thank people enough – but World Famous speed talker Fran Capo is setting out to prove you can thank people fast enough. And she’s doing it for a good cause. Save the Children, the world’s leading independent organization for kids, has enlisted Fran’s aid in their year-end fundraising appeal.

Fran is a six-time world record holder, most-widely known as the Guinness World Records™ fastest talking female, clocked at 603.32 words in 54.2 seconds. As a thank you, Fran will speed-read the name of every generous person who gives on Dec. 27 to commemorate the last #ThankYou Thursday of 2012.

"What could be a better cause than kids? Save the Children works in around the world from America to Zimbabwe, saving one child at a time," said Fran Capo. "Their caring staff cares for newborn babies, feeds hungry children, educates kids, and responds to disasters like Hurricane Sandy and the Japanese tsunami. I want to say a thank you to as many of their generous donors as I can." Save the Children is creating a "thank you" video recognizing all donors who donate online at >www.SavetheChildren.org/WithoutYou on Dec. 27 by 11:59 PM EST. The video will be narrated by Capo.

While many charities focus on saying "please" this time of year, Save the Children is upping the ante on ways to say "thank you." The organization will also thank every donor who donates, then tweets, using #withyou and @SavetheChildren. In that vein, Save the Children has launched a dedicated webpage which hosts interactive word clouds of donors’ first names and U.S. states at www.SavetheChildren.org/WithYou.

Help us reach children in need by making a donation on December 27th and you'll have your name read in a special video by Fran Capo, the world's fastest talking female!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Save the Children

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.

About Fran Capo

Fran Capo is a stand-up comic, keynote motivational speaker, 18-time author, actress, voiceover artist, consultant, spokesperson, TV host , comedy show producer, and adventurer who has bungee jumped, scuba dived with sharks, driven race cars, did a book signing at the top of Mount Kilimanjaro and one down by the wreck site of the Titanic. Fran has been seen on over 350 television shows and 4,500 radio shows including: The Talk, Entertainment Tonight, Larry King Live, Huckabee, The Doctors, Fox & Friends, Nick at Nite and the Martha Stewart Show. She is a sought after speaker who has educated and motivated a wide array of audiences from CEO's of fortune 500 companies, to Hells Angels, to churches to elementary school children. Her humanitarian work is vast from fundraising for animals, to going to the Dominican Republic with 39 chiropractors to see over 19,000 patients in 2 days. She loves helping children in all aspects from building self-esteem to making them laugh. She has monthly series called, Cuppa Capo which are humorous motivational you tube videos to help inspire and motivate people to be the best they can be. You can find out more about Fran Capo at francapo.com



Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Katie Warner 203.221.4196

WESTPORT, Conn. (December 21, 2012) - Angry Birds are catapulting into the holiday season by backing Save the Children's global education programs with the release of their new holiday song, "Fly Me Home Tonight." The Finnish game maker Rovio, creator of Angry Birds, announced the holiday promotion on its blog. People can download the song on iTunes and all proceeds will benefit Save the Children.

"We are delighted to have Angry Birds put the merry into this holiday season," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "We hope their promotion will inspire holiday givers to flock to iTunes to download the song."

Save the Children will use the funds to establish clubs for schoolchildren in developing countries. These clubs encourage kids to play and have fun, while also learning key life skills that will improve the quality of life for them and their families.

So, grow some wings and soar to the nearest iTunes and help support Save the Children. Every peck counts!

Watch Now

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contacts
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810(O) 202.450.9153 (M)
Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)

GENEVA (Dec. 19, 2012) — The situation facing Syrian refugees is rapidly deteriorating, Save the Children warned today, as the UN announced it was appealing for $1 billion to help the growing number of refugees.

"The number of refugees now far outstrips what was predicted at the beginning of the year. Many of these are families who fled with nothing through the most appalling conflict, and their children are facing a harsh winter without proper shelter and clothing," said Mike Penrose, Save the Children's humanitarian director.

"The scale of the UN appeal reflects how serious this situation has become, and all the predictions are that it will get a lot worse. The challenge now is finding donors willing to step up and fund this; unless they do, hundreds of thousands of refugees will not get the lifesaving help they need."

Read the UN Press release here.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Jeremy Soulliere203.295.5842

Nobel Medal
Nobel Medal

BRUSSELS (Dec. 18, 2012) - Thirteen thousand children who have fled from conflict in Somalia and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) will benefit from the European Union's Nobel Peace prize money, granted to Save the Children and the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), it was announced today.

The announcement was made in Brussels by ECHO, the European Community Humanitarian Office, following the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to the European Union. The joint initiative between Save the Children and the Norwegian Refugee Council received nearly $1.2 million, and was one of four proposals to receive a total of $2.6 million, made up of Nobel Peace Prize money matched by the European Union

.

Save the Children will provide education to 4,000 Somali children living in refugee camps in the border town of Dollo Ado in Ethiopia. NRC will focus on 9,000 children affected by the conflict in Petit Nord Kivu, DRC.

The proposed projects will ensure that 13,000 highly vulnerable children displaced by conflict have access to safe, protective and nurturing spaces, in which they can attend education classes, begin to recover from the emotional distress of conflict and be supported in building their resilience to cope with their lives ahead.

"It is crucial that key agencies like ECHO see education as a vital component to ensure it is responding to what children need, and ensuring it endorses this through its own humanitarian operations," said Tove Wang, the chief executive of Save the Children Norway.

"We are thankful and honored. It is particularly gratifying that the prize money is earmarked for education in conflict areas. Education should be considered a critical part of any humanitarian response, in line with shelter, food and health care. Unfortunately, it is often deprioritized and underfunded. Globally, only 2 percent of total humanitarian funding goes into education programmes," said Elisabeth Rasmusson, secretary general of Norwegian Refugee Council.

In Dollo Ado, a special emphasis will be placed on bringing girls to school, including young mothers and girls attending to younger siblings. A total of 60 percent of the beneficiaries will be girls aged 11-14. Funding from the EU will also train teachers to ensure quality teaching.

Save the Children and NRC will set up temporary schools and learning spaces, train teachers and other community leaders, and provide teaching materials such as books, stationery, learning and play materials.

The projects will ensure that children attending these schools have access to other key lifesaving services including health, nutrition, hygiene and school feeding programs, as well as child protection services that identify and protect children from the threats and risks they face associated with living in refugee camps.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contacts
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (0)
Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843 (M)

Save the Children staff hand out pre-made aid packages to affected families in New Bataan after Typhoon Bopha made landfall in the Philippines on Dec. 4. In the worst affected areas, entire villages are flattened, with homes, schools, crops and commercial structures destroyed.
Save the Children staff hand out pre-made aid packages to affected families in New Bataan after Typhoon Bopha made landfall in the Philippines on Dec. 4. In the worst affected areas, entire villages are flattened, with homes, schools, crops and commercial structures destroyed. Save the Children photo.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Dec. 13, 2012) — Thousands of children and their families are sleeping out in open areas after Typhoon Bopha flattened entire villages in the worst-affected parts of eastern Mindanao in the Philippines, Save the Children says.

The aid agency says emergency shelter materials are needed urgently as evacuation centers overflow and families either live in open areas or attempt to repair their roofs and walls with whatever material they can find around them.

"Children have a right to feel protected regardless of their situation, and a sturdy house is important for them to feel safe at night. Sleeping in open areas also makes children more vulnerable to abuse and trafficking," said Anna Lindenfors, country director for Save the Children in the Philippines. "Save the Children is working to distribute emergency shelter materials for families as soon as possible."

In the worst-affected areas, Save the Children spoke to children whose homes had been damaged or destroyed. An 11-year-old girl, Kimberly, from Davao Oriental said: "We tried to fix our house with plastic sheets and scraps of wood we found in the area. But the floor was completely damaged as well, so I slept in my chair at night."

"My father and older brother fixed part of the floor, but I am scared that another storm like that would come, so I still sleep in my chair," she added.

Kimberly is among 1.6 million children affected in the storm, and her fear of rain and storms are shared by many who were unprepared for Typhoon Bopha. Save the Children, along with UNICEF and Plan International, are now urging all government agencies, local representatives and communities, as well as humanitarian partners to be attentive towards the needs and rights of children in emergencies. Together with the government, these aid agencies have also started registering children and making temporary care arrangements when needed.

Many homes in Compostela Valley have been destroyed in Typhoon Bopha.
Many homes in Compostela Valley have been destroyed in Typhoon Bopha.

Save the Children has been responding to the needs of children and their families through the distribution of pre-made aid packages containing toiletries, blankets, sleeping mats, mosquito nets and cooking pots and pans to nearly 2000 families. Additionally, Save the Children has also begun preparations to provide emergency shelter items, including tarpaulins and repair kits containing hammers, pliers and nails to over 6,000 affected families in Compostela Valley and Agusan del Sur. Child-friendly spaces will also be set up with toys and art materials that children can play, draw and paint with in the day. Volunteers and staff running these spaces will also provide psychosocial support to these children.

"These are some of the poorest and most vulnerable children, and they many have been through a terrible ordeal of losing their family members, relatives, friends, homes and belongings. It is important that we give them a sense of normalcy as soon as possible," said Anna Lindenfors. "A safe place to play in the day and a roof over their heads at night is vital to achieving that."

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contacts:
Tanya Weinberg 202.247.6610 (M)
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

WASHINGTON, DC (Dec. 12, 2012) — Save the Children strongly supports replacing the outdated Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 with the modernized and streamlined Global Partnerships Act, and stands ready to welcome the passage of this bill.

Congressman Howard Berman (D-CA), Ranking Democrat on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, will be introducing the legislation today. The bill is the first opportunity to overhaul the Foreign Assistance Act and promises to ensure that United States foreign aid architecture is among the most efficient and effective in the world.

The Global Partnerships Act will bring U.S. assistance into the 21st century by establishing a coherent framework for streamlining cooperation between Congress, the executive branch, and civil society. By requiring a comprehensive U.S. Strategy for Global Development every four years, it will guarantee a foreign assistance strategy that is clear, specific and current.

"We would like to thank Congressman Berman and his staff for undertaking the monumental task of drafting this thoughtful and comprehensive bill," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "The Global Partnerships Act will reaffirm the work that we have all been doing to ensure that aid reaches children and families who need it most."

Save the Children commends the drafting process of the bill, which was open and involved key civil society stakeholders. Passage of the legislation would significantly advance Save the Children's long-standing commitment to supporting poverty-focused development assistance, integrating comprehensive global health services, investing in local partners and improving accountability for results.

"We welcome the opportunity to work even more closely with partners in different sectors," said Miles. "In a time of budget negotiations and the looming fiscal cliff, it is more important than ever to reaffirm our support for effective U.S. foreign assistance. We'll never meet the critical needs of children unless we work together."

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contact:
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (Dec. 10, 2012) — Save the Children welcomes the European Union's decision to dedicate the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize money to provide education in disasters and conflicts. EU will match the prize to bring the total to 2 million euros (or around $2.5 million).

This is the first time the European Commission's humanitarian agency ECHO – the largest global humanitarian donor in the world – will exclusively dedicate funding to education in emergencies.

"Conflicts and natural disasters affect hundreds of thousands of children on a daily basis. Education will ensure children have the tools and resilience to think beyond the emergency and hope for a better future. The impact of education interventions go beyond the aftermath of an emergency," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children.

Globally, the lack of funding keeps many children out of education in these emergencies. This year, education needs only amounted to 1 percent of overall humanitarian aid, making it the most underfunded area.

"We welcome this as the first step toward building greater momentum around education as a critical part of any humanitarian response," said Miles. "It is crucial that key agencies like ECHO see education as vital to responding to what children need, and endorse this through its own humanitarian operations."

This announcement comes at a time when emergencies are overwhelmingly affecting children. For example, thousands of Syrian refugee children living in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey have had their lives interrupted and are waiting to go to school in refugee camps and host communities. The demand for schools and psychosocial support for children who have suffered is huge and is largely being ignored. Only 10 percent of the $13 million global funding goal has been met to ensure Syrian children have access to education.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



New Save the Children Report Reveals Findings of Research with Over 1,000 African Children and Key Stakeholders

Media Contact:
Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843 (M)

Voices from Urban Africa
Voices from Urban Africa
Summary
Full Report

WESTPORT, Conn. (Dec. 5, 2012) — Social and economic development policies in Africa are ignoring the demographic realities of an increasing number of children living in poverty in urban slums with devastating impacts, according to a new report by Save the Children. The report, entitled Voices from urban Africa: The impact of urban growth on children, is based on interviews, focus groups and other research with more than 1,000 children, parents and other community and national stakeholders in seven cities in six African countries including Ethiopia, Malawi, Mali, South Africa, Tanzania and Zambia.

"Already about 200 million children live in Africa's urban areas, and an increasing number are left vulnerable to abuse, exploitation and disease as populations move from rural to urban areas with little or no access to basic services," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "We are calling for increased commitment and targeted investment in partnerships and programs aimed at African children living in urban areas, particularly those most vulnerable."

The report highlights the demographic trends that put children in urban settings at increasing risk:

  • At present, about one-third (37 percent) of Africa's population is urban, but in the next two decades the majority of children are projected to live in urban areas. The region is currently experiencing the highest urban growth rates in the world.
  • Cities in sub-Saharan Africa contain the highest degree of urban poverty, prevalence of slum populations and measures of urban inequality of any region in the world. Currently, 60 percent of the African urban population lives in slum conditions.
  • Development indicators compare urban and rural areas within a country and rarely look at citywide statistics, within wealth sectors. Thus children and adults living in urban areas appear to be better off than those living in rural areas, creating an 'urban advantage' that obscure the hardships faced by those living in urban poverty and the vast inequalities present within urban communities.

The report identifies four key priority areas of need — child protection, health and nutrition, education and income generation/livelihoods.

  • Child Protection: Children, particularly without a parent or guardian, are exposed to risks and dangerous or age-inappropriate situations in public and often private settings. Particularly vulnerable are children with disabilities and unaccompanied children, including orphans and street children. Participants in the Adama, Ethiopia women's focus group said many children are brought to the city from rural areas by their relatives with promises of an education, but made to work as full-time domestic servants once they arrive. They also said many of these girls are abused and even raped by their relatives and are unable to escape their situation.
  • Health and Nutrition: Lack of water and sanitation facilities creates both public health and safety hazards and drains significant time and resources from poor families who are forced to spend many hours waiting in lines to access water. Poor families face many barriers to access health services, from cost to travel or waiting time due to overcrowding and lack of quality services. This especially impacts the lives of mothers and babies due to late care seeking among pregnant women — a common cause of maternal death and disability. Poor nutrition and hunger disproportionately affects the urban poor. Many slum families report eating two, sometimes only one, meal a day and poor children skip school to find food, beg or sell peanuts.
  • Education: Most children are missing out on proven benefits of early childhood care and development due to costs, especially those under the age of five. Poor children are not in school or experience many barriers to getting there, such as school fees, disabilities, bullying and sexual harassment by teachers and students, traditional ideas on gender roles, and pressure from families to engage in income-generating activities.
  • Livelihoods: Poor families often must rely on their children to contribute to economic survival, which can expose them to dangerous situations. Children as young as seven-years-old work for money or in-kind payment. Child labor includes street vending, piecework and running errands for adults, manual labor in mines and fields, illegal scavenging at mining sites, domestic work and transactional sex.

The report includes specific recommendations in each priority area, but Save the Children stresses the importance of working in partnership across sectors to create integrated programmatic responses, and for the need to improve research on the impact of urbanization on children to better support decision making and program design. This includes the need for urban statistics, disaggregated along socioeconomic and gender lines.

The report also talks about the need to create communities in urban settings that support children and families, particularly to increase child protection and prevent exploitation and abuse. "Children in rural areas are surrounded by grandparents, cousins, co-wives of their mothers and close neighbors," said Carol Miller, a co-author of the report. "Young children are rarely far from adults whom they know and trust, even when their parents are out searching for firewood or herding animals. This is not the case for children in urban communities who are often left at home alone for at least part of the day or sent to the market to work."

"We hope this report deepens understanding among the development community, including donors and policy makers, and helps us all respond more effectively to the needs of children throughout urban Africa," said Carolyn Miles. "With the right partnerships, the right resources and the right information, we can achieve real results for children."

To download a copy of the report, view a slide show, or learn more about the work Save the Children is doing for children in Africa and around the world, go to www.savethechildren.org/africareport.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contacts
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O)
Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843 (M)

Destruction caused by Typhoon Bopha in Compostela Valley Save the Children photo
Destruction caused by Typhoon Bopha in Compostela Valley. Save the Children photo.

WESTPORT, Conn., (Dec. 6, 2012) — Schools could be closed for months, disrupting the education of tens of thousands of children whose lives have been affected by a killer typhoon in the southern Philippines, warns Save the Children.

The leading child rights agency says up to 188,000 children have been caught up in the aftermath of Typhoon Bopha, many of them school-aged children. Anna Lindenfors from Save the Children in the Philippines said, "The extent of the damage means that children will not be able to return home or to school anytime soon. This can be very unsettling for them as they will now have to stay in cramped conditions in evacuation centres without any private bathing areas, sleeping areas or safe play spaces."

Emergency response teams from the children's charity have been to the worst affected areas on the island of Mindanao only to find flattened villages covered in mud. The death toll is now reported to be 327, with 437 missing. The authorities say it will take at least two months to restore power in the affected provinces.

Save the Children says that children in the worst-affected areas including Compostela Valley, Surigao del Sur and Davao Oriental will require long-term assistance.

In response to the crisis Save the Children is mobilizing pre-made aid packages that include crockery, mosquito nets, toiletries and blankets. Distributions will start tomorrow to at least 500 of the worst-affected families.

"These are families living in areas that were unaffected by last year's Typhoon Washi and have never been through anything like this. We are hearing reports that few families heeded warnings from the authorities to evacuate, resulting in a higher than expected death toll."

"Children will require much more aid to recover from this disaster," said Anna Lindenfors. "We need to set up safe spaces for children to play and talk about their experiences. Students will also need a place to learn and school materials to study with when the semester starts. These are essential to create a sense of normality for the children whose lives have been turn upside down by the typhoon."

Save the Children has been working in the Philippines since 1981 and has decades of experience responding to emergencies in the Philippines. The aid agency mounted large-scale emergency responses to Typhoon Washi in 2011 and Typhoon Ketsana in 2009.

Prone to natural hazards such as landslides and floods, the Philippines experience an average of 20 tropical storms a year and is located in a major earthquake zone where there are also active volcanoes.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contacts
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O)
Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843 (M)

Women and children arriving in the evacuation center in Camaman-an Elementary School. More than 170 families have now taken refuge in the school in Cagayan de Oro. There are about 1000 evacuation centers across Mindanao. Save the Children photo
Women and children arriving in the evacuation center in Camaman-an Elementary School. More than 170 families have now taken refuge in the school in Cagayan de Oro. There are about 1000 evacuation centers across Mindanao. Save the Children photo.

WESTPORT, Conn., (Dec. 5, 2012) — More than 200 lives have been lost and an estimated 36,000 children and families have sought shelter in evacuation shelters after Typhoon Bopha inflicted heavy flooding and winds of up to 210 km/h on the southern Philippines, says Save the Children.

Especially hard-hit is the island of Mindanao, still recovering from Typhoon Washi, which struck a year ago and killed more than 1,000 people. "Many of the children in Mindanao are just coming to terms with the devastating aftermath of Typhoon Washi," said Anna Lindenfors from Save the Children in the Philippines. "To have experienced another typhoon of such magnitude is very frightening."

Save the Children has rapid assessment teams on the ground and has deployed humanitarian response resources to the region, providing emergency services, water and sanitation supplies, and is coordinating with local partners to protect children affected by the storm. Save the Children is working to address the immediate needs of families displaced by Typhoon Bopha, as well as planning for long-term recovery efforts.

The Philippine local and national governments, assisted by international NGOs, are grappling with the impact of Bopha, launching search and rescue efforts for those who are still missing and addressing critical infrastructure outages.

Save the Children has been working in the Philippines since 1981 and has decades of experience responding to emergencies in the Philippines. The aid agency mounted large-scale emergency responses to Typhoon Washi in 2011 and Typhoon Ketsana in 2009.

Prone to natural hazards such as landslides and floods, the Philippines experience an average of 20 tropical storms a year and is located in a major earthquake zone where there are also active volcanoes.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contacts
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O)
Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843 (M)

Women and children arriving in the evacuation center in Camaman-an Elementary School. More than 170 families have now taken refuge in the school in Cagayan de Oro. There are about 1000 evacuation centers across Mindanao. Save the Children photo
Women and children arriving in the evacuation center in Camaman-an Elementary School. More than 170 families have now taken refuge in the school in Cagayan de Oro. There are about 1000 evacuation centers across Mindanao. Save the Children photo.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Dec. 4, 2012) — At least 40 lives have been lost and as many as 25,000 children and their families have sought shelter in evacuation shelters after Typhoon Bopha barrelled across Mindanao in the Philippines, says Save the Children.

Packing winds of up to 210km/h, Typhoon Bopha may have caused widespread damage, and seven provinces in Mindanao are known to have been affected. The island of Mindanao is still recovering from Typhoon Washi, which struck a year ago, killing more than 1,000 people.

"Many of the children in Mindanao are just coming to terms with the devastating aftermath of Typhoon Washi," said Anna Lindenfors from Save the Children in the Philippines. "To have experienced another typhoon of such magnitude will be very frightening."

"We are especially worried about children who are now greatly distressed by Bopha's torrential rains and flooding," added Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "Save the Children has 32 staff members in four districts in Mindanao and they stand ready to meet the needs of affected children and families, in the event that the impact of Bopha is devastating. We can mobilize pre-made aid packages and set up Child-friendly spaces for traumatized children, should the need arise."

The Philippine Government, together with local government units, response teams and international NGOs are well prepared for the impact of Bopha, stressing the importance of disaster preparedness from the national to community levels.

Save the Children has been working in the Philippines since 1981 and has decades of experience responding to emergencies in the Philippines. The aid agency mounted large-scale emergency responses to Typhoon Washi in 2011 and Typhoon Ketsana in 2009.

Prone to natural hazards such as landslides and floods, the Philippines experience an average of 20 tropical storms a year and is located in a major earthquake zone where there are also active volcanoes.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contacts
Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)
Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843 (M)

Syria Winter 2012
Syrian children warm their hands around a coal fire to fight the bitter cold of the desert winter

WESTPORT, Conn. (Dec. 3, 2012) — Fears are growing for Syrian children and families hit by freezing winter weather as huge funding shortages endanger relief operations in the region, Save the Children has warned.

A new report published by the aid agency, Out in the Cold, documents the desperate steps that children in Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan are taking to survive increasingly bitter weather in the region, with snow and sub-zero temperatures expected to hit many areas in the coming weeks. The current aid shortfall is over $200 million — half the total estimated needs — for Syrian refugees, hindering relief efforts and putting families at risk. Read the report.

Among the heart-rending testimonies given to Save the Children are children huddling three to a blanket, sleeping in makeshift shelters made of billboards and falling sick as temperatures plunge in the region.

"The heartbreaking stories we're hearing from Syrian refugees as winter approaches underline the fact that this crisis is rapidly deteriorating. Every day new refugees are arriving, but the funding required to give them the help they need is simply not there," said Save the Children International's Chief Executive, Jasmine Whitbread.

"The international community needs to match its diplomatic and security concerns with funding to help children. Unless there is a surge in funding, thousands of children are going to spend a bitter winter without proper shelter from the cold, and many will become sick as a result."

Some 400,000 refugees are living in tents, barns, unfinished buildings and other temporary shelters ill-equipped to provide protection from the cold. Many fled during summer months with only the clothes on their backs, and often children lack warm jackets and clothes to withstand the winter. In Iraq, the only footwear most refugee children have is the flip-flops they fled in.

In Jordan, parents are going into debt to provide basic clothing for their children, and in Lebanon, where there are no camps, high rents are preventing families finding or keeping adequate shelter. One group of refugees in the Beka'a Valley is facing freezing temperatures in shelters constructed from tarpaulins.

There are now fears that infections and diseases could spread amongst refugee children, who are particularly vulnerable to the cold weather, and are living in close proximity in refugee settlements.

  • "We have one blanket. We don't have anything else. We don't even have clothes. We received one blanket and we're three. When we cover ourselves with the blanket, it's not enough for us. We're getting sick — I'm getting sick." Ali, 11, living in an abandoned school.
  • "When I feel cold I start shivering — even now I feel cold. My throat hurts, and I feel like I have the flu. We need medicines." Ines, 8, living in a shelter made of billboards.
  • "When it rains outside, you really feel the cold. It's really bad for you. It's easy to get sick when you're freezing all the time." Rami, 11, living in a tent in a refugee camp.
  • "I have two daughters that are sick because of the cold. All my children are sick." Nadia, 30, mother of five-month-old child, living in an unfinished building.

Meanwhile, the international aid response remains only around half funded for those who have fled the country, prompting fears that the aid effort will fail to deliver help to many of those who urgently need it. Numbers of refugees pouring out of Syria have already far outstripped official expectations published earlier in the year.

Save the Children is on the ground in Lebanon, Iraq and Jordan, helping thousands of children who have fled to neighbouring countries recover from their experiences and prepare for the coming winter. The agency has launched an appeal for $35.9 million to help fund its work in the region.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)
Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (Dec. 3, 2012) — As Filipinos brace for the imminent arrival of Typhoon Bopha, aid workers from Save the Children are on high alert and ready to meet the needs of children affected by the storm, if there is a need for a large-scale humanitarian response.

The typhoon, known locally as Pablo, is expected to pound the country's eastern border on Tuesday, bringing high winds and heavy rains. Already thousands of people in Mindanao have begun to evacuate areas where the typhoon is expected to hit.

Save the Children's Anna Lindenfors in the nation's capital Manila said, "Mindanao has experienced heavy winds and rain over the last 24 hours. Save the Children is monitoring the situation closely. We have staff on the ground and pre-made aid packages to distribute if needed. Children are always the most vulnerable in a disaster and we stand ready to respond to their needs."

Save the Children has been working in the Philippines since 1981 and has decades of experience responding to emergencies in the Philippines. The aid agency mounted large-scale emergency responses to Typhoon Washi in 2011 and Typhoon Ketsana in 2009.

To help, please visit www.savethechildren.org/philippines-donate

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contacts:
Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171

With Disney's contribution, we can help rebuild thousands of children's lives affected by Sandy,
With Disney's contribution, we can help rebuild thousands of children's lives affected by Sandy," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children's CEO.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Nov. 27, 2012)—Save the Children announced today that it has received a $250,000 donation from Disney in support of its recovery efforts for children and families in New York and New Jersey affected by Superstorm Sandy. Working in cooperation with FEMA, The American Red Cross and other local and state agencies, Save the Children focuses its disaster response activities to ensure that the needs of children are not forgotten during times of crisis.

"With Disney's contribution, we can help rebuild thousands of children's lives affected by Sandy," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children's CEO. "Children are naturally vulnerable, and the experiences they have had during Sandy will stay with them for a considerable time. It is our purpose to ensure that those children – and their parents and caregivers – have the specialized support to cope and recover. We are able to deliver on that promise to kids with Disney's help."

Immediately following the storm that devastated the East Coast and forced thousands form their homes, Save the Children was there with kits to establish Child Friendly Spaces at shelters in New York and New Jersey. These safe play areas allow children to socialize and begin to recover from emotional distress in the storm's aftermath. Additionally, the organization distributed in-kind contributions of cribs, baby care supplies, hygiene kits and nutritious snacks.

In the weeks and months ahead, Save the Children will be helping to restore access to local child care services or initiate temporary education programs in affected communities; working with local education and child care providers to implement its signature Journey of Hope programs, pioneered after Hurricane Katrina in 2005, to help children process and express the fears, emotions and stresses they experience during a disaster and build their own coping mechanisms; and assisting communities in emergency preparedness over the longer term so that those responsible for children are able to safeguard them when a disaster strikes.

To support Save the Children's Superstorm Sandy recovery efforts, visit savethechildren.org/sandy or text HURRICANE to 20222 to donate $10 from your mobile phone. When you receive a text message, reply YES.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)

Thousands of children displaced by fighting in and around the city of Goma in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) risk recruitment to armed groups, Save the Children has warned. File photo UNHCR/A. Bronee.
Thousands of children displaced by fighting in and around the city of Goma in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) risk recruitment to armed groups, Save the Children has warned. File photo UNHCR/A. Bronee.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Nov. 26, 2012) - Thousands of children displaced by fighting in and around the city of Goma in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) risk recruitment to armed groups, Save the Children has warned.

Thousands of people have fled Goma as rebels took over the city this past Tuesday. Save the Children staff on ground in the city report that children have been separated from their parents in the rush to escape the rebel advance, and could face recruitment from armed groups operating in the area.

"Any child separated in the rush to flee the fighting is at grave risk of being recruited by any one of several militias in the area," said Rob MacGillivray, Save the Children’s country director in the DRC. "We know that these groups have had few qualms about forcing children to join in the past and have no reason to suppose they will take a different approach now. The situation is extremely chaotic, with some families being displaced more than once, and we can only imagine how confused and frightened children caught up in this violence will be."

The aid agency is also deeply concerned that vulnerable families and children are unable to access healthcare and warns that food supplies are quickly running out. An estimated 400,000 people live in Goma, and the surrounding area is home to another 300,000 displaced people, according to the UN.

Tens of thousands of people have already fled the area, with children particularly vulnerable. "In any refugee crisis children face a range of risks, including separation from their families, abuse and exploitation, but the long-term insecurity in the eastern DRC means children are in a particularly dangerous situation," MacGillivray continued.

"They may be alone in an area where armed groups often recruit children, have witnessed terrible things, and without basic supplies like food and clean water. We call all sides to ensure that children are offered the protection they are owed and that they can be reunited with their families as soon as possible."

Save the Children is on the ground in Goma, but its humanitarian work has been suspended until the situation becomes safe enough to commence operations. In the meantime the aid agency is preparing to assist refugees and displaced families should there be movement from the DRC into Rwanda.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

Bulgari Save the Children ring

Bulgari Ring for Save the Children

WESTPORT, Conn. (Nov. 21, 2012) – Successful sales of a specially-designed silver and ceramic ring have pushed donations to a Save the Children global education campaign past $20 million, exceeding a target set in 2009 when the partnership began, said Bulgari. Bulgari made the announcement on November 15 at the Rome opening of "Stop. Think. Give," a photo and video exhibit of photographer Fabrizio Ferri chronicling the Bulgari/Save the Children partnership over the past four years.

Inspired by the iconic B.zero1 jewelry line, the special ring was launched in October 2010 and is available in Bulgari stores worldwide, select department stores, and on Bulgari’s e-commerce website for $420, of which $90 goes to Save the Children.

"The partnership with Save the Children has given us great satisfaction, and the sound results registered by the sales of the ring testify the enthusiasm and commitment of our clients, as well. I am extremely proud to see that our support is having an impact on the lives of some of the most vulnerable children on earth. This sharing of common efforts and values allows us to reconcile business growth with sustainable development, passing on a positive message in times of economic and political uncertainty," said Michael Burke, Chief Executive Officer of the Bulgari Group.

Campaign reaches more than half a million schoolchildren in more than 20 countries

Bulgari’s key focus is to provide quality education opportunities to transform children's lives. Through the partnership, Save the Children has reached more than 500,000 children and trained more than 18,000 teachers through educational activities in more than 1,000 schools, many of which are located in areas affected by conflict.

The campaign supports a range of educational projects in more than 20 countries around the world. Some highlights:

  • enrolling disabled children in school in rural areas of China and India, where these children would otherwise be excluded from going to school
  • bolstering education for children in countries caught up in conflict in the Ivory Coast, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Southern Sudan, where entire educational systems have been devastated
  • improving educational opportunities for marginalized children in the urban megalopolises of Brazil and Mexico, where access to education offers concrete opportunities for the future of the children and their communities.

The full list of countries includes: Albania, Afghanistan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Haiti, Indonesia, India, Italy, Mexico, Montenegro, Japan, Kenya, Ivory Coast, Southern Sudan, Tunisia, Uganda, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Bulgari is part of the LVMH Group. Founded in Rome in 1884 as a single jewelry shop and progressively imposed itself with its magnificent jewelry creations, emblems of the Italian excellence. The international success made the company evolve into the current dimension of a global and diversified player in the luxury market, with a store network in the most exclusive shopping areas worldwide and a portfolio of product and services ranging from jewels and watches to accessories, perfumes and hotels.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



(Nov. 27) Offers Fun, Meaningful Ways to Celebrate the Season of Giving

Media Contact
Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843

Goats are one of the many items in Save the Children’s Holiday Gift Catalog.

Goats are one of the many items in Save the Children’s Holiday Gift Catalog.

WESTPORT, Conn., (Nov. 20, 2012) – Gobble up lots of turkey and get energized to join Save the Children, the world's leading independent organization for children, in its biggest charity holiday fundraising effort yet. On November 27, Save the Children will partner in the first-ever GivingTuesday, a day designed to transform the way people think about, talk about and participate in the giving season by maximizing the power of social media.

"Giving Tuesday is an exciting collaboration among leading charities like Save the Children to celebrate America’s generosity," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "As part of this effort, we are proud to offer an array of fun and meaningful ways for donors to spread holiday cheer to children in need in the U.S. and across the globe. We look forward to achieving our biggest giving season ever."

Here are some holiday ideas from Save the Children on how individuals may honor loved ones on GivingTuesday and throughout this giving season while creating a better and brighter future for children in need:

Turn up the volume on children’s issues: Send your friends and family a download of OneRepublic’s newest hit single, Feel Again from iTunes. Use your iTunes application to purchase, and then select gift. For every download purchased, Save the Children receives a portion of the proceeds.

Meet Your Match: A generous donor will match every dollar donated to Save the Children on or before December 31st up to $500,000 – so your gift will go twice as far!

Shop 24/7: With Save the Children’s 2012 online Holiday Gift Catalog* you can avoid the crowds and log on day or night to find the perfect gift that keeps on giving. For example, you can help:

  • Fill the Gap ($19) by giving an artisan bracelet, handmade and fairly-traded in Nepal and help address the most urgent unmet needs of children and families in the U.S. and across the globe.
  • Curb obesity ($35) in the U.S.: by providing children living in poor rural areas with healthy snacks in after-school and summer programs and help children develop healthy eating habits that benefit them now and into adulthood.
  • Support a Family’s Future ($50) by giving a goat, which provides the two-fold benefit of generating income and supplying protein-rich food and dairy for children’s diets.
  • Educate a Girl ($70) by providing books and learning materials to help keep a girl in school.

Kick off your holiday shopping: Purchase a One World Futbol -- the virtually-indestructible ball that never goes flat, never needs a pump -- on www.oneworldfutbol.com/holidaygiftgiving and One World Futbol Project will donate a ball to Save the Children. This new campaign supports the domestic and international programs of Save the Children that use sport and play to benefit children most in need.

On the Run? Help improve a child’s life from the palm of your hand. Simply text SAVE to 20222 to donate $10 to Save the Children.

For more information about Giving Tuesday, follow #GivingTuesday on Twitter or visit GivingTuesday.org. To learn more about Save the Children’s gift giving opportunities, visit SavetheChildren.org.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

*Items listed in the gift catalog, represent current Save the Children programs, and donations for gifts go to its many programs and not necessarily to a specific project. This enables Save the Children to combine gifts with other donations to provide tangible solutions that help create real and lasting change for children in need.

Without You...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Save the Children gathers national leaders in emergency preparedness and child care to ensure kids' safety during disasters.

Media Contact(s)
Ajla Grozdanic 202-640-6709(O), 202.262.7171(M)
Sarah Thompson 202.640.6931(M)

Save the Children Senior Vice President Mark Shriver joined FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate onstage at the Child Care Emergency Symposium where he spoke about the necessity of protecting children during disasters like Hurricane Sandy. The Washington, D.C. event convened 100 leading emergency and child care experts to encourage collaboration across national, state and local levels in keeping kids safe.
Save the Children Senior Vice President Mark Shriver joined FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate onstage at the Child Care Emergency Symposium where he spoke about the necessity of protecting children during disasters like Hurricane Sandy. The Washington, D.C. event convened 100 leading emergency and child care experts to encourage collaboration across national, state and local levels in keeping kids safe.

WASHINGTON, D.C., (Nov. 16, 2012)—Two-and-a-half weeks after Superstorm Sandy devastated the East Coast—the memories of loss and destruction still fresh on the nation’s mind—Save the Children convened leading emergency and child care experts to ensure that children’s unique needs will be met when the next disaster strikes.

"Children are always the most vulnerable during a disaster," said Mark Shriver, Senior Vice President of Save the Children’s U.S. Programs. "And for the first time, we have brought together leading national, state and local voices in the areas of emergency preparedness and child care, united by one mission—keeping America’s kids safe."

Nearly 100 professionals representing government agencies, private organizations and child care facilities gathered yesterday at the Child Care Emergency Preparedness Symposium, at the Capital Hilton in Washington, D.C., to discuss best policies and practice in preparing for the worst. The event was hosted by Save the Children, in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Child Care Aware of America and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

The goal of the symposium is to ensure collaboration at all levels—from federal and state governments to private organizations to home-run day care facilities—so that all caregivers will be equipped with the skills and resources they need to protect the 11 million children under the age of 5 who are in child care on any given day.

Keynote speakers included Craig Fugate, Administrator for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Senator Mary Landrieu (D-La), Linda Smith, Deputy Assistant Secretary at the Administration for Children and Families, and Mark Shriver, Senior Vice President of Save the Children’s U.S. Programs.

Recently returned from visits to Sandy-affected communities in New Jersey and New York, Administrator Fugate discussed the critical role of child care as an essential service in getting a community back to normalcy after a disaster like Sandy. Fugate emphasized the necessity of collaboration between national, state, and local stakeholders in making meaningful change for children.

"When we’re preparing for disasters, children need to be part of the plan," said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate. "Children comprise about one quarter of the U.S. population and are often the most vulnerable in emergencies and disasters. Engaging children and child care professionals is an integral step in preparing our nation for the hazards our communities face."

Sen. Landrieu, who was instrumental in authoring and passing a long-term Hurricane Katrina recovery bill, which included a number of child care provisions, spoke about the importance of making children’s needs a policy priority.

"Children are disproportionally affected by disasters. They are also the heart of their families, and parents who cannot find a safe and productive environment for them after disaster strikes, including an open school or child care center, cannot return to work or begin rebuilding their home or business," said Sen. Landrieu. "These parents are first responders, teachers, nurses, utility repairmen, construction workers, and other citizens who play a critical role in the community's return to normalcy. I commend Save the Children for hosting this important symposium to help us better protect our most precious resource and build more resilient communities."

Fueling the urgency for preparedness improvements, Save the Children’s National Report Card of Protecting Children During Disasters found that an astounding 31 states do not require all regulated child care facilities to meet at least one of three basic emergency preparedness standards, potentially leaving thousands of our most vulnerable citizens unprotected during disasters. The three child care standards call for written plans for evacuation and relocation and for family reunification following an emergency, as well as specific plans to assist children with disabilities and those with access and functional needs.

"Most parents assume that when they drop their kids off for the day, their children will be safe if disaster strikes," said Shriver. "But our new survey shows that only 20 states require the basic emergency preparedness regulations for child care facilities."

Added Shriver, "The failure by states to establish basic emergency preparedness regulations for the nation’s youngest and most vulnerable children in child care puts many of these children at great risk should a disaster strike."

The Child Care Emergency Preparedness Symposium marks the official launch of Save the Children’s U.S. Center for Child Development and Resiliency, an online forum that endeavors to equip professionals, volunteers and families with the skills and resources needed to give all children a better chance for a brighter future. Coinciding with the event, Save the Children released its new Child Care Emergency Preparedness Training, now available on the U.S. Center.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need—access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

In the United States, Save the Children’s early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 185,000 children last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



Media Contacts

Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843 
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (November 19, 2012) — Save the Children is calling for an immediate end to the conflict in Gaza and Israel as the number of child casualties mounts.

Families in the Gaza Strip who are used to living in very difficult conditions are now running out of food and water, hospitals are running out of supplies and more than 1.7 million people – half of whom are children – have been trapped in their houses for days, with power outages lasting up to 18 hours a day.

“It is a dangerous and terrifying time for children – who make up nearly half the population of the Gaza Strip,” said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. “Most families have been trapped at home for four days, unable to leave to find basic supplies. With so many children already malnourished and suffering from anemia, the impact on children’s health is potentially devastating.”

“There is no clean water so children are going to have to start drinking the polluted tap water soon which is going to cause more severe health problems,” added Miles. “When they fall ill their parents can’t take them to the hospital.”

Schools and clinics have been badly affected. Twenty-five schools have been damaged along with two clinics and one hospital. The damage to schools will affect children from both Gaza and Israel as schools will remain closed for the duration of this conflict.

Save the Children has launched an emergency response to the escalating violence.

As soon as it is safe to do so, teams will distribute food, water and shelter materials to families, and vital medicines to hospitals, the aid agency said. It will also set up child spaces with specially trained staff and counsellors to help children cope with their experiences and support basic education to re-start.

“The escalation of violence on top of an already fragile situation is extremely dangerous for children,” said Alex Schein, Save the Children’s Country Director. “They are being deeply affected by what they have experienced, and many could need specialist care and support. The fear among adults is unbelievable so you can imagine what it’s like for children.”

Save the Children is calling for an immediate and permanent cease-fire.

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Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

 



Current Limits of Prevention for the World's 15 Million Preterm Births Contrast with High, Immediate Potential to Save Preterm Babies Lives with Low-Cost Care, Says Lead Author

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

Dr. Joy Lawn talks about what can be done now to save preterm babies.

WESTPORT, Conn. (November 15, 2012) — The first multi-country study on trends in preterm births and the current potential to reduce them will appear in Friday's Lancet medical journal and show that after years of poorly explained rises in preterm birth, the rates over the last 5 years are now leveling off in more than half of 39 high income countries assessed.

But with few highly effective interventions for preterm prevention, the U.S. and 38 other high-income countries could reduce preterm births by only 5% by 2015, even if the five currently available evidence-based interventions were fully implemented, according to the new study. The research was conducted by an international team of researchers and coordinated by Save the Children.

Yet even this tiny reduction of 58,000 preterm births annually could result in $3 billion cost savings because care for extremely premature babies, is complex and expensive, and also results in lost earnings for families. Almost half of this cost saving would be in the United States, which has over half a million preterm babies each year.

"This study shows that even the best efforts based on current science could prevent only a tiny fraction of the massive number of preterm births," said Dr. Joy Lawn of Save the Children's Saving Newborn Lives program, and the study's lead author.

"On the other hand, we already have high impact low-cost care that could save at least half the 1.1 million newborns deaths that occur from preterm births each year," she said. "More than 85% of preterm babies are only a few weeks preterm — born too soon, but not born to die. There is no excuse for these babies to die when essential, simple care will save their lives."

"We need urgent action on two gaps — the knowledge gap for preventing preterm birth, and the action gap to save newborn babies' lives now by getting frontline health workers and essential medicines to the mothers and babies who need care the most," Dr. Lawn said.

Save the Children calls on Americans to honor the critical and lifesaving role of health workers by nominating a health worker that made an impact in their own lives at www.TheRealAwards.com.

75% of Preterm Babies Could Be Saved without Neonatal Intensive Care

Existing, low-tech interventions could prevent 75 percent of 1.1 million annual preterm deaths, the vast majority of which occur in developing countries. Steroid injections for women in preterm labor, antibiotics for newborn infections and Kangaroo Mother Care (wrapping preterm babies in skin-to-skin contact with their mother for warmth and easier breastfeeding) could save hundreds of thousands of lives.

The new Lancet study is a follow on from the groundbreaking "Born Too Soon" report on prematurity published in May with input from 50 organizations coordinated by the World Health Organization, March of Dimes, PMNCH and Save the Children. That report was based on the first national and global numbers of preterm babies, also published in The Lancet in a study coordinated by Dr. Lawn.

Born Too Soon focused on care and set a target of reducing preterm deaths by 50% by 2025. The new Lancet paper addresses preterm prevention, and recommends a target of only 5% by 2015 for preventing preterm births and only in high-income countries, where detailed records made the analysis feasible. The five interventions the authors found could lead to that 5% reduction are: smoking cessation, decreasing multiple embryo transfers during artificial insemination, cervical cerclage (a surgical procedure), progesterone supplementation and reduction of elective C-sections.

Get Involved, Help Save Lives

Greater investment in training and equipping frontline health workers is needed to deliver the care needed to save babies' lives, Save the Children said. Newborns are vulnerable and preterm babies, the most vulnerable. Health workers and families need support to ensure these babies survive and thrive.

Yet another new study published in PLoS Medicine shows that only 0.01 percent of foreign assistance programs for maternal, newborn and child health mention interventions that specifically help newborns survive. The United States is currently the largest funder for newborn programs globally, but Congress could soon slash the 1% of the budget that goes to foreign assistance.

To oppose such cuts, send a letter to Congress here: www.savethechildren.org/cuts.

Saturday is World Prematurity Day

In related action this week, more than 40 countries are planning activities on Saturday, November 17 for World Prematurity Day. Activities are designed to raise awareness about the more than 1 in 10 babies who are born prematurely and to mobilize action to improve care and address prevention worldwide.

In Malawi, which has the world's highest estimated preterm birth rate, health officials are holding a summit to expand the use of kangaroo mother care and help ensure that antenatal steroids reach all who need them. The Ugandan government will host a national stakeholder meeting on preterm birth and announce a commitment on preterm birth to the Every Woman Every Child movement, which is led by the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Other countries are participating in awareness campaigns, such as the Global Illumination Initiative where cities are lighting landmarks and buildings, such as The Empire State Building, in purple to honor preterm babies and their parents.

The new Lancet study coordinated by Dr. Lawn included experts from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Boston Consulting Group, March of Dimes, National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth, and the World Health Organization. Read the study

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

IKEA Holiday Soft Toys Campaign Runs from Nov. 4 to Dec. 29

Holiday sales from IKEA's soft toy collection, including circus tiger, will help pump up global education programs around the globe.
Holiday sales from IKEA's soft toy collection, including circus tiger, will help pump up global education programs around the globe.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Nov. 14, 2012) — Mr. Broccoli, Clown Dog and a cast of adorable soft toy characters; thousands of these IKEA soft toys were given out yesterday on streets across America to kick off the annual IKEA Soft Toys for Education global campaign. Whether one keeps the soft toy or donates it to a deserving child or charity, this IKEA Random Act of Life Improvement* is just another way to let everyone know this heart-felt campaign has purpose.

For every IKEA Soft Toy or children's book bought between Nov. 4 to Dec. 29, 2012, the IKEA Foundation will donate one euro ($1.30) to education programs worldwide supported by UNICEF and Save the Children.

This year's Soft Toys for Education campaign aims to provide quality education to children living in need in developing countries. Since the campaign started in 2003, donations from the annual IKEA Soft Toy Campaign have totalled 47.5 million Euros (over $61 million), helping 8 million children in more than 40 countries enjoy their right to a quality education.

"Thanks to the funding from the global IKEA soft toy for education campaign, Save the Children can continue to work on changing the lives of children with disabilities and in minority groups in Eastern Europe and South East Asia and help them to gain a quality education. We are proud to be a part of this cause-marketing campaign," said Caroline Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children.

"Last month world leaders rallied together in a final push to meet the global commitment to ensure access to primary education for all children. IKEA, the co-workers and customers who have supported the Soft Toys campaign are helping to make this important goal a reality. Since 2003 the campaign has raised an impressive 31 million euros for education programs supported by UNICEF. As a result, we have been able to work with partners to provide access to quality education to millions of children, and with your help this year we will reach many more," said John Winston, UNICEF Global Corporate Account Manager.

Hedgehog, Bear, and Owl Join Other Forest Friends

IKEA Soft Toys range in price from $.49 to $19.99. New to the soft toys family this year are forest friends from the VANDRING series, like a hedgehog, a bear and an owl hand puppet that encourage caring about our environment. They appear on different VANDRING textiles, designed by Ann-Cathrine Sigrid Ståhlberg. Plus, they're characters in the IKEA FAMILY children's book, The Hedgehog Leaves Home written by Ulf Stark and illustrated by Ann-Cathrine.

Funds donated to Save the Children will support projects to educate the most marginalized children, including ethnic minorities and those with disabilities and special needs in Cambodia, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Lithuania and Romania. Funds donated to UNICEF will support UNICEF's Schools for Africa initiative to provide a quality education to children in Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, South Africa and Malawi.

"Soft Toys are a great way for IKEA customers and co-workers to share a little holiday-season cheer with our own children, while helping other children we may never meet or even see, but who desperately need our support," noted IKEA Foundation CEO Per Heggenes.

*The Soft Toy giveaway is the first of two planned Random Acts of Life Improvement, unexpected out-of-store activities during which IKEA surprises consumers with tokens of appreciation to help improve their day. It's part of the third annual IKEA Life Improvement Project, a program designed to offer consumers ideas and inspiration to help them make a positive impact on their homes and the lives within.

About IKEA:

IKEA, the world's leading home furnishings company, was founded in 1943 in Sweden. Since then, IKEA, the Life Improvement Store has offered home furnishings and accessories of great design and quality with functional living solutions at everyday low prices. Currently there are more than 298 IKEA Group stores in 26 countries, including 50 in North America (11 in Canada; 38 in the US; 1 in the Dominican Republic). IKEA has six distribution centers in North America. The IKEA Group employs 131,000 coworkers and had 655 million visitors in FY 11. IKEA incorporates environmentally friendly efforts into day-to-day business and continuously supports initiatives that benefit causes such as children and the environment including UNICEF, Save the Children and American Forests. To visit the IKEA Web site, please go to www.IKEA-usa.com. and also learn more about IKEA environmental and social responsibility actions and programs. Also visit www.Facebook.com/IKEAUSA.

About Save the Children:

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



1Love Foundation, Made for Good to Raise Funds through T-Shirt Campaign for Save the Children's Literacy Boost Program

Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

Save the Children and the 1Love Foundation

WESTPORT, Conn. (November 13, 2012) — Save the Children's literacy programs in several African countries will get a boost from a new limited-edition T-shirt campaign sponsored by The 1Love Foundation, created by the Marley family to realize Bob Marley's hope for a united and peaceful world, and Made for Good, a brand that raises money for non-profits through apparel sales. The Save the Children T-shirt campaign is part of a new initiative launched this month by 1Love Foundation and Made for Good to offer limited-edition monthly T-shirt campaigns that benefit 1Love charitable partners, including Save the Children. Each T-shirt design is creatively inspired by Bob Marley, his music, lyrics and life.

The inaugural Save the Children design is synonymous with 1Love's core mission,"Youth. Planet. Peace," and features timeless imagery of Bob Marley. The T-shirt, available in men's and women's sizes, sells for $25, with $10 going to the 1Love Foundation in support of the Save the Children's Literacy Boost program. The T-shirt is available for purchase online at madeforgood.com/gotw from Nov. 13 to Nov. 23.

"1Love strives to find creative and compelling ways to work with our charity partners. We are excited to launch this program with Save the Children to provide the much needed books to educate our children," said Cedella Marley of the 1Love Foundation.

Net proceeds from the premier T-shirt collection will support Save the Children's Literacy Boost program. Literacy Boost is an innovative, educational response to an alarming global trend — the rise in the numbers of children finishing primary school who are unable to read well enough to learn. Literacy Boost is underway across Africa, including in Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, South Africa, Uganda and Zimbabwe.

"Save the Children is delighted to tee off this new charitable partnership with 1Love and Made for Good. We hope this campaign motivates everyone to snatch up a T-shirt, knowing that part of the purchase will help kick-start a better quality education for African children," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children's president and CEO.

For every $10,000 raised, Save the Children and 1Love can do one of the following:

  • Create 25 new book banks — or small mobile libraries in communities or schools — with 100 to 250 books;
  • Restock 40 book banks with new reading materials;
  • Offer nine teacher training sessions, and provide teaching and learning materials for 60 teachers; or
  • Train 100 reading volunteers in communities, and supply them with books and other reading materials.

"We are extremely honored to have 1Love be a part of the Made For Good family, and the Limited Edition T-Shirt campaigns is really the first major step for us as partners to bring about change and support for those in need. I think we really have something special going, and for Bob Marley fans, will offer up some very inspirational t-shirts," said Mark Bubb of Made for Good.

About 1Love

The 1Love Foundation is a public non-profit 501(c)(3) and a global movement created by the Marley family to do good in honor of Bob Marley's vision of a better tomorrow. Committed to furthering his legacy by fostering programs, spreading ideas, and encouraging good deeds that speak to our three key initiatives: Youth, Planet and Peace. To bring these projects to life, 1Love aligns with charities and causes that support the nourishment and education of children, protect the earth, and promote the wellbeing of humanity in order to create lasting change for generations to come. For regular updates, exclusive invites and information, you can follow 1Love on their Facebook, Twitter or at www.1love.org

About Made for Good

1Love is a partner with MADE FOR GOOD, a collective of like-minded socially conscious brands assembled into one community, sharing a common goal to use retail to power humanitarian change in the world. Each Made for Good brand aligns with a non-profit partner and uses the voice of apparel and accessories to raise money through the sale of its products. Through this innovative process Made for Good utilizes fashion and retail to facilitate a greater purpose. For more information, visit www.madeforgood.com.

About Save the Children

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

Children play in the corridors of an abandoned school, now being used as a shelter for over 12 Syrian refugee families in North Lebanon. October 25, 2012. Photo Credit: Hedinn Halldorsson.
Children play in the corridors of an abandoned school, now being used as a shelter for over 12 Syrian refugee families in North Lebanon. October 25, 2012. Photo Credit: Hedinn Halldorsson.

WESTPORT, Conn. (November 9, 2012) – Tens of thousands of children escaping the conflict in Syria to neighbouring countries are out of school, a crisis expected to deepen as rising numbers of refugees continue fleeing the country.

More than 40,000 Syrian refugee children are currently unable to go to school in Lebanon and Iraq alone, warns Save the Children. But the real number of children affected is believed to be much larger since this figure does not include refugees that are not registered.

"Demand for education has been skyrocketing across the region with thousands of families desperate to get their children in school as the academic year kicks off. But there simply aren't the schools to host everyone, and nowhere near enough funds for agencies like Save the Children to cover the costs," said Amy Mina, Save the Children's Iraq country director.

"These children have been through so much already and urgently need the stability and structure education can bring, to help them recover and fulfil their potential."

There are currently some 350,000 Syrian refugees in neighbouring countries, a figure expected to surpass 700,000 by the end of the year, more than half of them children. Many risk missing the entire school year after going through deeply disturbing experiences, including living under intense shelling without enough food and witnessing the murder of relatives.

Families are listing education as among their most urgent needs, with many parents being unable to send their children to school for up to 18 months. From prior experience, the longer children are out of school the harder it can become for them to return to the classroom, risking a lost generation.

No School at Iraqi Refugee Camp; Existing Schools in Lebanon and Jordan Close to Reaching Capacity

But despite the urgent need for children to get back into class, schools are not always available for refugee children. In Iraq, Save the Children estimates that up to 1,000 children in one refugee camp alone are missing out on even a basic education.

In Lebanon and Jordan, existing schools are close to reaching capacity, while in all three countries, preschool options for the youngest children and informal education opportunities for adolescents remain extremely limited. In Lebanon alone, more than 40,000 children are estimated to be out of school while less than 14,000 have been registered to resume their schooling.

With support from UNICEF in Jordan, Save the Children has helped to register more than 7,000 refugee children in governmental schools. In Lebanon and with support from UNHCR and UNICEF, Save the Children has to date helped to register more than 7,500 children for school and provided them with essential school materials as well as scholarship funds to ensure families do not have to pay school fees they cannot afford. In Iraq, Save the Children is working alongside UNICEF to coordinate school activities with child play areas to ensure that when children are not in school, they still have a safe and supervised area to play.

While these combined efforts represent a major step forward for refugee children, the numbers of requests for registration have already far outstripped both schools' capacity and agencies' funds to provide support, causing Save the Children to call for increased donations.

Save the Children has launched an international emergency appeal of US$31 million for its relief efforts to support refugee children and their families fleeing the ongoing conflict in Syria. Funds raised will go towards ensuring families have access to basic health, education and nutrition, and that they are provided with adequate shelter, hygiene and food to stay warm and healthy before the cold winter months approach.

Save the Children will also work to ensure children are kept safe from harm, and are given the support and care they need to begin recovering from their ordeal. Save the Children has been working in the region for nearly 60 years.

Note to Editors:

In Lebanon there are 110,095 Syrians registered and in contact with UNHCR, 51% of them children, bringing the total to an estimated 56,148 children. As of November 1st, the total number of refugees registered for school is only 13,319 according to the Ministry of Education.

In Iraq, Save the Children estimates there are over 2,500 children currently staying in two refugee camps in Al Qaem near the Syrian border. A school has been opened in Camp One but it is only providing schooling to just under 900 children between grades 1 — 9 (roughly 6-14 years old), leaving scores of children in that camp without pre-school or secondary education. There is no schooling available in Camp Two, where up to 1,000 children live.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



Organization Will Deploy Staff to Affected States along East Coast to Ensure Children’s Needs Are Being Addressed in this Crisis

Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)

Hurricane Sandy
When Hurricane Isaac struck the Gulf Coast in August 2012, Save the Children was on the ground ready to assist families and children, like these two girls displaced from their home in Louisiana. In Isaac's aftermath, Save the Children provided families the things they needed most through distributions of 780,600 diapers, 264,000 baby wipes and 2,160 infant/toddler hygiene kits benefitting more than 46,000 children in the region.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Oct. 29, 2012) — East Coast-bound Hurricane Sandy is only hours away from potentially wreaking havoc and disrupting many lives in the region. As the Eastern United States braces for possibly greater damage than that caused by last year’s Hurricane Irene, Save the Children’s emergency responders are on high alert to help children and families, particularly in areas at high-risk in New Jersey, New York, Connecticut and coastal communities in other states.

Save the Children has led disaster preparedness and risk reduction programs throughout America in recent years, in order to minimize the devastating impact of storms like Hurricane Sandy on children. The organization has a history of responding in the areas that could be hardest hit by this storm and has helped provide kid-friendly relief supplies and other essential support.

“Children are always the most vulnerable in an emergency situation, so Save the Children makes sure there are safe places for children in evacuation centers,” said Jeanne-Aimée De Marrais, who led Save the Children’s recent response to Hurricane Isaac, during which the organization provided much-needed relief to families affected by the storm.

“We are ready to provide local shelters with our Child Friendly Space kits and the training they need to help children deal with this traumatic experience.”

When it comes to protecting our children during disasters, preparedness is key. In 2009, Save the Children donated 100 Child-Friendly Space kits to New York City's Office of Emergency Management through our partnership with the agency. When Hurricane Irene struck two years later, these kits were used to create child-friendly environments in 82 hurricane shelters housing 1,708 children.

Said De Marrais: “Through our preparedness, response and recovery programs, we have put the unmet needs of children and their caregivers first.”

To support Save the Children’s relief efforts and donate to our Hurricane Sandy Children in Emergencies Fund, visit: www.savethechildren.org/sandy

About Save the Children
Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need—access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

In the United States, Save the Children’s early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 185,000 children last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



Organization's Emergency Response Teams are Monitoring Storm's Progression toward East Coast.

Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)

Hurricane Sandy
When Hurricane Isaac struck the Gulf Coast in August 2012, Save the Children was on the ground ready to assist families and children, like these two girls displaced from their home in Louisiana. As part of the immediate response, 13 shelters in Louisiana and Mississippi implemented Child Friendly Spaces, Save the Children's signature program, serving 1,300 children. In Isaac's aftermath, Save the Children provided families the things they needed most through distributions of 780,600 diapers, 264,000 baby wipes and 2,160 infant/toddler hygiene kits benefitting more than 46,000 children in the region.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Oct. 25, 2012) — Hurricane Sandy could make landfall in the United States. Save the Children's emergency response experts are closely monitoring the potentially devastating storm and stand ready to respond to the unmet needs of children. Save the Children recently provided much needed relief to families affected by Hurricane Isaac.

When it comes to protecting our children during disasters, preparedness is key. In 2009, Save the Children donated 100 Child-Friendly Space kits to New York City's Office of Emergency Management through our partnership with the agency. When Hurricane Irene struck two years later, these kits were used to create child-friendly environments in 82 hurricane shelters housing 1,708 children.

You can help Save the Children be prepared, and contribute to our efforts to support your neighbors in need during their darkest hours. When disaster strikes, it is not always immediately clear where and how much help will be needed. But we do know, no matter what, disasters will continue to strike American communities — and, no matter what, we will be ready to help.

We need your support to help us prepare. By contributing to the U.S. Emergencies Fund, you enable us to serve children through disaster planning, preparedness, response and recovery work. Your gift will enable us to serve children and families through:

  • Disaster relief plans
  • Emergency preparedness
  • Response efforts
  • Psychosocial support
  • Recovery work
  • Other needed programs

To support Save the Children's relief efforts across America, donate to Save the Children's U.S. Emergencies Fund.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help



Children in Coffee Farming Communities to Benefit from Better Farming Practices and Education on Eating a Variety of Nutritious Foods

Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (Oct. 24, 2012) — Save the Children has received a $1.5 million grant from Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (GMCR) to fight hunger and improve the well-being of children in coffee-growing communities in Aceh province of Indonesia, a region where GMCR has sourced its coffee — much of it Fair Trade Certified™ and organic — for more than 10 years. This new grant brings GMCR's contributions to Save the Children programs in Indonesia to $2 million over the past two years.

The $1.5 million grant will fund a project called LINK — Livelihoods and Improved Nutrition for Kids, and is the second grant the company has given over three years to this project. The new funding will be used to expand the LINK program to additional families in the region. An initial $500,000 grant, awarded in 2010, targeted 5,500 small-scale coffee growing families. At the beginning of the project, 46% of families surveyed reported food shortages in the prior 12 months. After two years of education on food diversification, child health and nutrition, that number dropped to 6%.

"My husband and I never thought that a small parcel of land could be profitable to us," said Asnaini, a mother of three who lives in Bener Meriah, Indonesia. Save the Children's LINK program provided Asnaini with vegetable seeds and education on composting, fertilizing and pest control. "Through the home gardening program, I can provide my children more easily with healthy, nutritious food and also have a more consistent additional income which I can use to buy my children's school uniforms and supplies," Asnaini said.

"We have found that joining with other organizations enhances our ability to help farming families become more self-sufficient," said Rick Peyser, director of Social Advocacy and Supply Chain Community Outreach for GMCR. "The success of the LINK project is a great example of what can be accomplished when we all work together toward a common goal."

"We're grateful for GMCR's support of this LINK program," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "Together, we have strengthened food security for coffee growing families in Indonesia, and helped their children gain access to key health services."

The project with Save the Children is one of many projects funded by GMCR in the Aceh region of Indonesia to address the needs of small-scale coffee farmers, including programs around financial literacy, health care and sustainable coffee production.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)
Jeremy Soulliere 203.341.8203 (O)

BLOOMINGTON, Minn. (Oct. 16, 2012) — Students at Ramalynn Montessori Academy teamed up with the Minnesota Vikings to tackle childhood hunger this morning, becoming the first school in the United States to participate in Save the Children's World Marathon Challenge.

The Ramalynn students joined more than 20,000 children in 42 countries worldwide taking part in Race for Survival, a simultaneous relay spanning the marathon distance of 26.2 miles. The 27 students, ages 11 to 13, ran a combined 210 laps in solidarity with those facing hunger around the world, working to raise awareness of World Food Day, held every Oct. 16, and the urgent need to fight childhood hunger and malnutrition.

"Living off the land, as many poor, rural families do around the globe, can be a tough life. Many families face the daily challenge of not knowing where their next meal is coming from. Feeling hungry is hard for anyone at any age, but when a young child doesn't get the right food in the early years, it can put the brakes on her growth and development, affecting her for the rest of her life," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "Save the Children aims to create a level playing field where all families have access to nutritious food or have the means to buy it. That's why we appreciate the support of these students in the race against hunger. Together, we can fight child hunger and give every kid a chance to grow up healthy and prosper."

Vikings linebacker Jasper Brinkley, along with the team's mascot, Viktor the Viking, and its cheerleaders, joined Bloomington Mayor Gene Winstead at this morning's Race for Survival event. Thirty-six Ramalynn students ages 7 to 11 also competed in a 1500 meter relay with 63 other teams from around the world.

"The World Marathon Challenge is a great example of kids getting engaged to make a difference with children from other countries," Winstead said. "I hope every school in Minnesota will participate next year."

Save the Children also collaborated with Google+ to host a 12-hour "Great Debate" on child survival on the Google+ hangout platform. They brought together 30 celebrities, politicians, civil society actors and children from 15 countries to discuss ways to avoid millions of preventable child deaths.

To join the Save the Children/Google+ "Great Debate," visit www.raceforsurvival.net.

To follow the schools in the world that participated in the race, please visit www.competitioncentre.net/map.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



Actress Jennifer Garner, Former Senator Chris Dodd (D-Conn.) and Senator Bob Casey (D-Pa.) Urge Citizens, Policymakers to Put Children First

Media Contacts
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)
Madeline Daniels 202.999.4853

America's Report Card 2012: Children in the U.S.
Save the Children Artist Ambassador Jennifer Garner urged policymakers in Washington, D.C. Wednesday morning to do better for our children. The actress, joined Save the Children's Senior Vice President, Mark Shriver; president of First Focus, Bruce Lesley; former Senator Chris Dodd and Senator Bob Casey to announce the findings of America's Report Card 2012: Children in the U.S.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Oct. 10, 2012) — America earned a lackluster C- grade on child well-being, according to a national report card released today by First Focus and Save the Children. Artist Ambassador for Save the Children, Jennifer Garner, joined Sen. Bob Casey (D-Pa.) and former Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.) to announce the findings of America's Report Card 2012: Children in the U.S.

"The number of Americans living in poverty remains at a historic high, with nearly one in four children knowing all too well what it means to go without," said Garner. "Childhood poverty sets children up for failure in school, impacts their health, and can pre-determine the course of their lives. So why, then, are children being left out of the conversation during an election season in which the economy is the primary issue? We need to do better for our kids."

Commissioned by Sen. Dodd and Sen. Casey, America's Report Card provides a holistic picture of unmet needs in five areas of a child's life: economic security, early childhood education, K-12 education, permanence and stability, and health and safety. The report also urges the American people to take action to boost children's chances for success in school and life: vote in November's general election for candidates who support investments in children; hold elected officials accountable for commitments to help children succeed; and engage with other local leaders to improve the lives of children in their own communities.

More than 300 policymakers and congressional staff, children's advocates, and concerned citizens attended the report's launch. Bruce Lesley, president of First Focus, described the grading system and provided an overview of the 2012 grades. Mark Shriver, senior vice president of Save the Children's U.S. Programs, urged our country's leaders to summon the political will to end childhood poverty by investing in early childhood education, a key to a brighter future for our children, and our country.

"Children can't appear on cable talk shows, contribute to political campaigns or vote. Politicians know this and listen to the loudest voices in the political arena," said Sen. Dodd. "With the election quickly approaching, you can be the voice for children. This November, cast a ballot for candidates who will put children first. And after the election, no matter which candidates win, it is up to you to hold them accountable to ensure children are a legislative and budgetary priority."

"The future of our nation rests in our ability to give every child the opportunity to succeed," said Sen. Casey. "That is why I have fought to build support for initiatives to increase access to early learning programs and to ensure children have access to healthy food. Preparing children for the future must be part of our strategy to continue to grow the economy and create jobs. By giving our children the best shot at success, we can also boost the nation's productivity, increase prosperity and fuel competitiveness."

"The presidential candidates this year are talking about building an even greater, more prosperous and more competitive nation. And yet, during the first presidential debate, neither candidate mentioned the poverty epidemic affecting the lives of 16 million children in America," said Shriver. "Reducing the deficit is not mutually exclusive from reducing poverty. Childhood poverty costs our nation $500 billion per year. If the candidates are truly serious about building a stronger America, then a meaningful debate about ending childhood poverty must become part of the conversation."

"We grade kids all the time," said Lesley. "It's time to take responsibility as a nation for the decisions that determine whether kids can succeed. We can't be satisfied with a C-, but raising the grade means getting involved, voting for kids, and holding politicians accountable."

The report card assigned the nation grades in five key domains of a child's life:

  • Economic security: D, based on the number of children living in poverty, experiencing food insecurity and unstable housing.
  • Early childhood: C-, based on early learning program availability and enrollment, as well as access to child care.
  • K-12 education: C-, based on children's math, reading and science levels, school resources, the number of at-risk youth, and educational attainment.
  • Permanency and stability: D, based on the well-being of children impacted by the child welfare, juvenile justice, and immigration systems.
  • Health and safety: C+, based on the state of health insurance coverage for children, access to health care and preventive services, public health and safety, and environmental health.

For the complete report, go to: www.firstfocus.net/americas-report-card-2012-children-in-the-us

About First Focus

First Focus is a bipartisan advocacy organization dedicated to making children and families a priority in federal policy and budget decisions. For more information, visit www.firstfocus.net.

About Save the Children

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



Award is part of Accenture's global corporate citizenship initiative, Skills to Succeed

Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

MANILA, Philippines (October 9, 2012) — Save the Children and Accenture (NYSE: ACN) today announced Accenture and the Accenture Foundations have awarded Save the Children an additional grant of US$1.8 million to help the organization provide approximately 7,000 disadvantaged and at-risk young people — including nearly 5,000 young women — in Egypt, Indonesia and the Philippines with business skills that strengthen employment opportunities. The grant brings Accenture's direct support to Save the Children to more than US$2.5 million since 2010.

The award reflects Accenture's global corporate citizenship initiative, Skills to Succeed, which will equip 250,000 people around the world by 2015 with the skills to get a job or build a business. The two year grant will help Save the Children deliver market-relevant education, mentoring relationships, internships and apprenticeships that assist young people in finding a job or building a business.

"Supporting Save the Children helps exemplify Accenture's commitment to building skills and improving the communities in which we live and work," said Jill Huntley, senior director of corporate citizenship at Accenture. "Save the Children is proving it's possible to create positive change and a lasting impact on the economic well-being of individuals by connecting them with organizations, programs and skills that can help them succeed."

The grant — which will build on the successes and lessons from Save the Children's ongoing Skills to Succeed projects in China, Bangladesh and Bosnia — will also fund an assessment of job market conditions and needs, help establish strong connections with prospective employers and provide advocacy for long-term change in governmental policies and programs.

"We selected Egypt, Indonesia and the Philippines based on our strong youth programs in each nation and our relationships with people in government and civil society who are committed to developing the skills of unemployed young people and helping them advance," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "By engaging Accenture employees in our work, we can better identify country-specific job market needs and address them to help lift youth out of poverty."

About Accenture

Accenture is a global management consulting, technology services and outsourcing company, with 257,000 people serving clients in more than 120 countries. Combining unparalleled experience, comprehensive capabilities across all industries and business functions, and extensive research on the world's most successful companies, Accenture collaborates with clients to help them become high-performance businesses and governments. Through its Skills to Succeed corporate citizenship focus, Accenture is committed to equipping 250,000 people around the world by 2015 with the skills to get a job or build a business. The company generated net revenues of US$27.9 billion for the fiscal year ended Aug. 31, 2012.

About Save the Children

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Inaugural Program to Recognize Honorees in the United States and Nine Other Countries

Media Contact
Phil Carroll 202.640.6823 (O) 202.215.6823 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (October 8, 2012) — Save the Children has announced the launch of The REAL Awards, a first-of-its-kind global awards program designed to develop greater respect and appreciation for health workers and the lifesaving care they provide globally, as well as in the United States. The REAL Awards is made possible by the support of presenting sponsors Medtronic Foundation, The Merck Company Foundation, and Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation and Competition in Healthcare, and supporting partners GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis and Time Inc.

"Every year, awards are given to recognize the accomplishments of celebrities, actors, singers, athletes and entertainers," said Mary Beth Powers, Campaign Chief for Save the Children's Newborn and Child Survival Campaign. "Alongside the Oscars and Golden Globes in January, we will begin to honor a group of people who rarely receive recognition or accolades — health workers."

By some estimates, the world is short more than 5 million health workers, including one million frontline health workers. This shortage of easily accessible health workers is acute for rural settings in both developing countries and in the U.S. Frontline health workers are often community health workers and midwives who provide access to healthcare locally or in the home, although they can also include local pharmacists, nurses and doctors. In the developing world, where well-equipped doctors and hospitals are scarce, frontline health workers are the first and often only point of contact to the health care system for millions of people.

It is estimated that every 3 seconds, a child's death is prevented thanks to care provided by a frontline health worker. But many don't have all the support and supplies that they need to do their jobs well, and hundreds of thousands more are needed to end preventable deaths and to tackle the challenges of chronic diseases that need to be managed regularly.

The public can read the inspirational stories of the international REAL Awards honorees and nominate a health worker in the United States at www.theREALawards.com until November 29, 2012. Winners will be announced the week of January 13, 2013 during a time when much of the American public is tuning in to traditional entertainment awards shows such as the Golden Globes and the Academy Awards.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Floods damage schools in other parts of the country, affecting some 58,000 students

Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

Save the Children's Mali Emergency Program
Chuickne, 6, receives schools supplies from Save the Children, including a new backpack. He and his mother fled the conflict in Mali's North for Bamako. His father remains in Timbuktu. Photo Credit: Katie Seaborne

BAMAKO, Mali (October 4, 2012) — The vast majority of children in the North of Mali, especially those living outside of major cities, are out of school as a result of the conflict, Save the Children has found. Due to huge damage to school buildings and learning materials, a shortage of teachers and school closures, education is increasingly out of reach for children. Mounting insecurity also is forcing children to stay at home and drop out of school, just as the new school year gets underway.

As co-lead of the Education Cluster — a United Nations mechanism for coordinating emergency education assistance - Save the Children recently led an assessment in the occupied North. The assessment revealed serious obstacles to schooling — nearly three-quarters of the 25 local organizations surveyed in the North estimate that schools had been vandalized, looted or destroyed; a third estimate that schools were occupied by armed actors; half of the organizations estimate that the teachers had fled to the South and three-quarters of them estimate that schools reported supplies, furniture and teaching materials has been lost or damaged. As a result, a vast majority of schools are no longer open and for many children school is becoming an ever more distant memory.

Tom McCormack, Save the Children's Country Director of Mali, said: "The reports of the destruction of schools and the dropout rates of children are extremely concerning. The inability to go to school can have a serious and long-term impact on children's learning and development. We urgently need further funding to meet the significant needs of displaced children throughout Mali."

The Education Cluster has previously estimated that among the 300,000 students in the North, only 20% have displaced to the South or have sought refuge in neighboring countries. The 240,000 who remain in the North have little to no access to education, leaving children at risk of recruitment into armed groups. According to the UN, at least 175 children were recruited into armed groups between April and June this year. "I want to finish my education, despite the troubles in my country," says 16-year-old Agai who fled the insecurity in the North. "We came by car to Bamako — it took us two days. We had some food and water with us but I was scared. I am now staying with my aunt in Bamako so I can complete my education. I think it's important that I finish my education, even though there are troubles here. I really want to be a nurse and I want my country to be peaceful."

Recent flooding, resulting from parched land unable to absorb heavy rains quickly, has added yet another challenge for school children throughout Mali. The Education Cluster found that 290 schools across the country have been flooded, affecting some 58,000 children. In the Kayes region, where Save the Children teams are delivering life-saving assistance to families affected by the food crisis, 70 schools with an estimated 16,000 enrolled students have been impacted by the flooding. While the government reports most of the estimated 58,000 students have been able to begin the new school year as planned, many schools are operating under unsafe and difficult condition, including structural damage to classrooms and the loss of school supplies to the floods.

Despite the significant needs and warnings by international agencies about the impact of the conflict on education, funding remains critically low — just 4% of the pooled humanitarian appeal for education is funded. Save the Children has been working in Mali for 25 years and is rapidly scaling up its programs in response to the needs. With more funding, Save the Children could continue to deliver education and teaching supplies to the most vulnerable schools throughout Mali and build the capacity of teachers and school directors. Go to www.savethechildren.org/west-africa-hunger-1 to support Save the Children's efforts in West Africa.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Editor's note: Following the coup d'etat in March this year, armed groups advanced South and now occupy the northern half of the country — an area the size of France. The political and social situation in Mali is extremely fragile and the UN estimates over 118,000 people have been forced to leave their homes as a result.



Media Contacts
Wendy Christian 203.465.8010
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647

Save the Children Calls for More Protection for Syrian Children

Save the Children is on the ground on Syria’s borders, providing emotional support to thousands of children who have fled to neighboring countries. Photo credit: Jonathan Hymes

NEW YORK, NY (September 25, 2012) — Syrian children need special care after witnessing killings, torture and other atrocities in the country’s conflict, Save the Children warned today.

Shocking testimony collected from refugees in Save the Children projects has revealed that children have been the targets of brutal attacks, seen the deaths of parents, siblings and other children, and have witnessed and experienced torture.

“Horrific acts of violence are being committed against children in Syria,” said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children President and CEO, who is in New York for the United Nations General Assembly week. “These children need specialist care now to help them recover from their shocking experiences. Their testimonies should also be documented so that these violent acts against children are not committed with impunity.”

Save the Children is on the ground on Syria’s borders, providing emotional support to thousands of children who have fled to neighboring countries, helping them recover from their experiences and rebuild their lives. The agency has launched an appeal to help fund its work in the region.

The aid agency is also calling for the UN to step up its documentation of all violations of children’s rights in Syria and that it should have more resources to do this, so that crimes against children are not committed with impunity.

Interviews are available with Kathryn Bolles, Director of Save the Children’s Emergency Health Unit, who returned last week from the refugee camp in Jordan.

How You Can Help Children in Syria

Donate to the Syria Children in Crisis Fund at www.savethechildren.org/syria 

Sign the Petition to the United Nations Calling for More Protection for Syrian Children at www.savethechildren.org/syria-petition

About Save the Children

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Awards to Fund Innovative Literacy Programs in Malawi and Sri Lanka

Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

Books are difficult to find in rural Malawi. Save the Children's literacy project will help volunteers create books with locally sourced materials. March 2012. Photo Credit: Amos Gumilera.
Books are difficult to find in rural Malawi. Save the Children's literacy project will help volunteers create books with locally-sourced materials. March 2012. Photo Credit: Amos Gumilera.

WESTPORT, Conn. (September 19, 2012) – Save the Children has been named a winner of two USAID "All Children Reading" awards for its innovative literacy approaches to get communities to create reading materials in Malawi and to reach children with special learning needs in Sri Lanka.

The awards were given by USAID, and its partners Australian Agency for International Development and World Vision,as part of their multi-year initiative called "All Children Reading: A Grand Challenge for Development." Launched in 2011, All Children Reading seeks to identify and fund groundbreaking low-cost solutions, focusing on teaching and learning materials and on education data, with the potential to dramatically improve early grade literacy skills.

"We are honored to receive these All Children Reading awards," said Dan Stoner, associate vice president of Save the Children's Education and Child Development department. "There are many children today sitting in class who are shut out of learning because they struggle to read and understand the most basic words. This funding will allow Save the Children to further develop our model literacy program to meet the learning needs of all children in a community."

Save the Children's projects are two of the 32 winners chosen from 450 entries from businesses, social enterprises, entrepreneurs, non-profits, academic institutions, and other organizations, in more than 75 countries.

Save the Children's Malawi and Sri Lanka reading programs are modeled after the agency's global Literacy Boost program, which is showing impressive gains in early grade reading among young children in a dozen countries in Asia and Africa. Through these projects, Save the Children will measure children's reading abilities to see how much they know, train teachers in more effective classroom techniques, and mobilize parents and local volunteers to help children learn to read through community-wide activities like reading camps and reading buddies.

Creating Books and Print Materials to Boost Malawian Children's Reading Skills

Research shows that literacy skills in the early years improve dramatically when children are exposed to a variety of print materials. Yet in most rural communities in Malawi, reading materials are difficult to attain.

Save the Children's literacy project in Malawi seeks to solve this problem by engaging teachers, parents and community volunteers to create their own low-cost reading and teaching materials for early readers from locally- sourced products. These learning materials – such as word cards, pictures, symbols, diagrams and short stories – will be created in local languages, will be culturally relevant and will be connected to the school curriculum. The materials will be used by teachers, parents and community volunteers involved in the literacy project to help Malawian children become lifelong lovers of learning.

The literacy project will also train community volunteers on ways to earn money for replenishing and improving the quality of learning and teaching materials, as well as paying for school-related costs to keep orphaned and vulnerable children in school and attending Save the Children's after school reading camps.

Supporting Sri Lankan Children with Special Learning Needs

Save the Children's literacy program in Sri Lanka is tailored to elementary school children who are struggling to learn to read, and have been labeled "slow learners." In schools where they have identified slow learners in the classroom, the percentage of children in this group can be as high as 25%.

To better understand who these slow learners are and what special support they might need, Save the Children will look into why some children are struggling to read. Based on the results of that study, the literacy project will train teachers how to identify and engage slow learners, and how to track their progress over time. To help these children become fluent readers, the project also will provide teaching and reading materials in local languages for use in the classroom, at home and during community activities.

With funds received from the "All Children Reading" awards, Save the Children will improve and test its literacy programs in 20 schools in Malawi and 15 schools in Sri Lanka.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Threat of Us Budget Cuts Could Slow Child Survival Progress, but New Hit Song and Campaign Aim to Galvanize Americans

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (Sept. 12, 2012) — The United States has played a major role in reducing global child mortality to the historically low levels announced today, Save the Children said. But the international aid agency urged all Americans to speak up for such efforts now, warning that looming budget battles could threaten continued progress.

Annual child deaths have fallen below 7 million for the first time, the United Nations reported today. In an effort to accelerate that progress and end all preventable child deaths, Save the Children has launched its new Every Beat Matters campaign to give Americans easy and concrete ways to help achieve this goal.

"The new child mortality estimates show that concerted efforts to get proven lifesaving care to children work and that, in the 21st century, children no longer need to die from preventable causes," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "But the new report also shows that the low-cost solutions that could save these lives still aren't reaching many mothers, newborn babies and children – especially those who need them most. Every American has the power to help change that."

The Every Beat Matters campaign features the band OneRepublic's new single "Feel Again," which opens with the sound of a child's heartbeat. In creating the song, the band drew inspiration from recordings of healthy children's heartbeats collected in Guatemala and Malawi. Those children are cared for by some of the many health workers trained through U.S. government aid programs.

"Feel Again" can be downloaded at www.EveryBeatMatters.org and a portion of proceeds will benefit Save the Children's child survival efforts. Other actions on the site include options to send a letter to Congress to show support for U.S. efforts and to share videos, stories and heartbeat-inspired Tweets with friends to build momentum in the fight against child deaths.

"It may seem daunting, but Americans should know that their country has been a leader in the effort to save millions of children's lives, and as individuals they can absolutely help save those who still die," Miles said. "But if people don't raise their voices now, we fear Congress could slash the tiny part of the budget that is helping some of the world's poorest countries dramatically reduce child deaths."

The new U.N. report ranks the leading causes of child death as pneumonia, premature birth, diarrhea, childbirth complications and malaria. Every Beat Matters puts a special focus on training and supporting frontline health workers who can treat and prevent these causes of death in their own communities.

The report also shows that as deaths to all children under age 5 have dropped, those occurring in the first month of life have declined more slowly. As a result, newborn deaths now account for 43 percent of child deaths, up from 36 percent in 1990. Overall, the vast majority of child deaths—83 percent—now occur in sub-Saharan Africa and south Asia.

Save the Children said it is a critical time for Americans to help maintain momentum following a "Child Survival Call to Action," convened in June by the U.S. government together with UNICEF and the governments of India and Ethiopia. Healthier children are the foundation for more productive, prosperous and stable communities, which benefit everyone, the agency said.

"We know where the children are that still need basic care to survive birth complications and childhood disease, and we know how health workers can save them," Miles said. "It's an issue everyone can get behind, because every beat matters."

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Created with Children's Heartbeats, OneRepublic's New Single "Feel Again" Powers New Multimedia Campaign to Save Children's Lives

Media Contacts
Save the Children: Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647
Ad Council: Ellyn Fisher 212.984.1964
BBDO: Roy Elvove 212.459.5797

NEW YORK, NY (September 10, 2012) PRNewswire — Launching today, Save the Children and Ad Council's Every Beat Matters campaign draws on the power of music inspired by children's heartbeats to give Americans new ways to help millions more children survive.

Multimedia public service ads featuring the creation of OneRepublic's new single "Feel Again" debut today and will be distributed to more than 33,000 media outlets nationwide. The ads — created pro bono by ad agency BBDO New York and filmed by Academy Award-nominated directors Sean and Andrea Fine — show how children's heartbeats collected in remote villages of Malawi and Guatemala inspired a hit song that can help bring hope to children around the world.

A portion of "Feel Again" proceeds will benefit Save the Children's Every Beat Matters campaign, which aims to bring basic lifesaving care to children around the world. Every year about 7 million children die before their 5th birthday — mostly from preventable and treatable causes, including pneumonia, diarrhea and newborn complications.

"We're excited to team up with Save the Children to let people know we all have the power to help children survive," said Ryan Tedder, lead singer of OneRepublic. "Feel Again is an opportunity for us to be the voices for these children. We hope the song they inspired will now inspire others to join the Every Beat Matters campaign."

The PSAs drive to www.EveryBeatMatters.org where people can download the song and take other actions to help save children's lives. The web site also features personal blogs of frontline health workers trained by Save the Children to prevent and treat the major causes of child death in their own communities. Such workers, including community health workers and midwives, are often the only link to health care for children living beyond the reach of hospitals and clinics in developing countries.

"Health workers prevent a child’s death somewhere in the world every 3 to 4 seconds — but we can save many more children by better supporting health workers," said Mary Beth Powers, the Director of Save the Children's campaign for child survival.

The Every Beat Matters campaign includes TV, radio, print, outdoor and digital PSAs as well as a robust social media program that will broaden the reach of the campaign via Facebook at facebook.com/everybeatmatters and Twitter @EveryBeat.

"Every Beat Matters is an innovative and groundbreaking extension of our efforts with Save the Children to deliver more lifesaving healthcare to children in need throughout the world," said Peggy Conlon, president and CEO of the Ad Council. "We are very grateful to BBDO and OneRepublic for their extraordinary contributions to the campaign, and I believe this creative will have a significant impact in empowering Americans to get involved."

"This isn’t just an execution. It's a movement," said John Osborn, President and CEO, BBDO New York. "The result is something we've never seen before. It's an idea rooted in something so simple — a heartbeat — but also so massive, it has the potential to touch everyone. It's certainly touched everyone at BBDO."

The Ad Council began working with Save the Children and BBDO to improve child survival through supporting local health workers in 2010. In the two years since launch the campaign has received more than $60 million in donated media.

Per the Ad Council model, the new Every Beat Matters PSAs will air and run in advertising time and space that is donated by the media.

Save the Children
Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. Save the Children works to achieve immediate and lasting change in children's lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, Save the Children mobilizes rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

BBDO New York
BBDO's mantra is "The Work. The Work. The Work." Every day, people in 289 offices in 81 countries work job by job and client by client, to create and deliver the world's most compelling commercial content. BBDO was named 2011 Global Agency of the Year by both Adweek and Campaign magazines and, for the past six years in a row, has been recognized as the world's most creative agency network in The Gunn Report. BBDO is also the number one ranked network across all marketing communication platforms in the Directory Big Won and has been named Network of the Year at Cannes five times. In 2011, BBDO was named the world’s most Effective Agency Network in the inaugural Effie Effectiveness Index.

BBDO is part of Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE-OMC) (www.omnicomgroup.com), a leading global marketing and corporate communications company.

The Ad Council
The Ad Council is a private, non-profit organization with a rich history of marshalling volunteer talent from the advertising and media industries to deliver critical messages to the American public. Having produced literally thousands of PSA campaigns addressing the most pressing social issues of the day, the Ad Council has affected, and continues to affect, tremendous positive change by raising awareness, inspiring action and saving lives. For more information, please visit www.adcouncil.org.  You can also visit www.facebook.com/adcouncil or follow the Ad Council on Twitter @AdCouncil.



Organization Deploys Staff to Louisiana and Mississippi to Ensure Children's Needs are Being Addressed in this Crisis.

Media Contacts
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)
Sarah Thompson 703.568.8611 (M)

Hurricane Isaac
One-year old Jazae, her dad and her 2-year-old sister have been in a Louisiana shelter for two days, crowded among 2,000 others seeking refuge from Hurricane Isaac. "I don't know how we're getting home or if there is a home there anymore," her dad said.

Hurricane Isaac

NEW ORLEANS, La. (August 31, 2012) — Save the Children's emergency response experts are on the ground in Louisiana and Mississippi, providing basic necessities and establishing child-friendly environments within shelters along the storm-ravaged Gulf Coast. This week, Hurricane Isaac caused strong winds, flooding and heavy rainfall in the region, forcing families to seek safety in shelters.

"Children are always the most vulnerable in an emergency situation, so Save the Children makes sure there are safe places for children in evacuation centers," said Jeanne-Aimée De Marrais, who is leading Save the Children's response team in Louisiana. "We have provided local shelters throughout the Gulf region with our Child Friendly Space kits and the training they need to help children deal with this traumatic experience."

After Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast seven years ago, Save the Children assisted more than 200,000 children affected by the storm, emerging as the national leader for children in disaster response. "Through our preparedness, response and recovery programs, we have put the unmet needs of children and their caregivers first," said DeMarrais.

Interviews are available with Jeanne-Aimee DeMarrais – 703.568.8611 or 203.919.2219.

To support Save the Children's relief efforts and donate to our Hurricane Isaac Children in Emergencies Fund, visit: www.savethechildren.org/isaac-1.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

In the United States, Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 185,000 children last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



A Major Gap in More than Half of the States' Disaster Preparedness Regulations for Child Care Facilities Puts Many Vulnerable Children at Risk, Save the Children Reports.

Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)
Sarah Thompson 703.568.8611 (M)

NOTE: Save the Children emergency responders are working on the Gulf Coast, preparing to respond to Hurricane Isaac. Contact Save the Children for details.

Hurricane Isaac

Jeanne-Aimee De Marrais, advisor for Save the Children's Emergencies Programs, assists a child as part of Save the Children's response to Hurricane Katrina.

Hurricane Isaac

WESTPORT, Conn. (August 28, 2012) — Thousands of child care facilities in 27 states are not required to specifically account for infants, toddlers or children with disabilities or those with access and functional needs in their disaster preparedness plans, according to a new national survey released today by Save the Children. States have had days to prepare for Hurricane Isaac, but many disasters occur without warning.

"The failure by states to establish basic emergency preparedness regulations for the nation's youngest and most vulnerable children in school and child care puts many of these children at great risk should a disaster strike," said Mark Shriver, Senior Vice President, Save the Children's U.S. Programs.

"These are infants and toddlers just learning to walk, as well as children with physical, emotional, behavior and mental health challenges – kids in wheelchairs, kids with autism, children with supplemental oxygen or feeding tubes. All of these children obviously are at great risk in an emergency," said Shriver. "While states have made some progress in protecting the most vulnerable, it is unacceptable that 27 states do not require child care facilities to have a specific disaster plan to help ensure the safety and well-being of at-risk children."

The report also faults states for failing to require schools to create multi-hazard, comprehensive emergency preparedness plans.

Added Shriver: "Most parents assume that when they drop their kids off for the day, their children will be safe if disaster strikes, but our new survey shows that only 17 states require the basic emergency preparedness regulations for both child care facilities and schools."

According to the report, 68 million children currently attend day care or school. Among the more than 11 million children under age five who attend day care, more than 1.5 million are less than a year old.

Called "The National Report Card on Protecting Children During Disasters," the report assesses all 50 states and the District of Columbia on four basic disaster preparedness and safety standards for children in child care and at school. Three of the standards focus on child care facilities and the fourth is for schools.

The three child care standards call for written plans for evacuation and relocation and for family reunification following an emergency, as well as specific plans to assist children with disabilities and those with access and functional needs. The school standard calls for multi-hazard plan to handle a variety of different disasters and emergencies.

During the past five years, the report noted that the number of states that meet all four standards has increased from four in 2008 to 17 in 2012. The report also found that:

  • Thirty-three states and the District of Columbia still fail to meet all four standards.
  • Twenty-seven states do not require all regulated child care facilities to have a written plan that accounts for kids with disabilities and those with access or functional needs.
  • Twenty states do not require all regulated child care facilities to have an evacuation and relocation plan.
  • Eighteen states still do not require all regulated child care facilities to have a family reunification plan.
  • Nine states still do not require K-12 schools to have a multi-hazard disaster plan that accounts for multiple types of disasters.
  • Five states — Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan and Montana — fail to meet any of the preparedness standards for regulated child care facilities or schools, putting many children at risk.

"As a nation we have a moral obligation to protect the most vulnerable during disasters," said Shriver.

To see how each state stacks up on protecting kids, and to read the full report, visit www.savethechildren.org/disaster-report.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

In the United States, Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 185,000 children last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



"Feel Again" Inspired by Real Heartbeats of Children in Need

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

Every Beat Matters - One Republic song
OneRepublic collaborated with Save the Children® and created an original song using the actual heartbeats of children in need.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Aug. 27, 2012) — OneRepublic is backing Save the Children and the Ad Council's new Every Beat Matters campaign for newborn and child survival, launching in mid-September, with the release of the band's new single today. People can visit EveryBeatMatters.org to download "Feel Again" and learn more about the campaign. A portion of proceeds from each download will benefit Save the Children.

OneRepublic lead singer Ryan Tedder wrote the song, drawing on recordings of heartbeats of children in remote villages of Malawi and Guatemala for inspiration.

Every Beat Matters aims to make basic lifesaving health care available to children around the world so that millions more survive. Every year, more than 7 million newborns and children die before their 5th birthday — mostly from preventable and treatable causes, such as pneumonia, diarrhea and malaria. Every Beat Matters champions training and supporting frontline health workers as the best investment to sustainably improve children's health in the world's poorest and most remote communities.

"OneRepublic has done something very magical and children around the world stand to benefit," said Save the Children's President & CEO, Carolyn Miles. "Just as children's heartbeats inspired 'Feel Again,' this powerful song can inspire people to help save children's lives. They can do that by downloading the song by joining Save the Children's newborn and child survival campaign at EveryBeatMatters.org."

People can learn more and get updates as the new campaign rolls out by liking the Every Beat Matters page on Facebook: www.facebook.com/everybeatmatters.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Agency’s U.S. Emergency Responders on High Alert to Respond to Children’s Needs in Florida and the Gulf Coast

Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718(M)
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (August 24, 2012) — Haitian children and families are bracing themselves for the landfall of Tropical Storm Isaac today, Save the Children has warned.

Tropical Storm Isaac is forecast to hit Haiti late on Friday, by which time its winds could have strengthened to hurricane force. The storm is expected to bring heavy rain, flash floods and mudslides, and poses a serious threat to thousands of families made homeless by the quake.

“Hurricanes can cause enormous destruction and even those in permanent buildings are not safe. It’s important that we are as ready as possible to reduce risks and to respond to disasters,” said Lisa Laumann, Save the Children’s country director in Haiti. “Families living in Haiti’s tent cities are in an extremely precarious situation. They have nowhere to go to seek shelter from the storm.”

Haiti is particularly vulnerable to natural disasters and hurricanes which, besides causing widespread destruction, can disrupt badly needed services for children, such as health care and education.

The latest forecasts on Friday morning show the path of Isaac moving through the Caribbean and taking aim over Florida and the Gulf Coast. Save the Children’s U.S. emergency responders are on high alert and ready to respond to children’s unique needs. Save the Children has led disaster preparedness and risk reduction programs throughout the Gulf Coast in recent years to help communities and families minimize the devastating impact of hurricanes and tropical storms like Isaac on children.

Donations can be made to the Tropical Storm Isaac Children in Emergency Fund, www.savethechildren.org/Isaac-1 to support Save the Children's responses to ongoing and urgent needs as a result of the hurricane and tropical storm.

Save the Children is working on the ground in Haiti, helping families recover from the earthquake and subsequent cholera outbreaks. Specialist emergency staff are currently in Port-au-Prince and are ready to launch a humanitarian response if required.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Global Gaming Champion “Athene” Helps to Mobilize Online Community

Media Contacts
Abby Safirstein 203.221.4231 or 914.552.5711
Wendy Christian 203-221-3767 or 203.465.8010

WESTPORT, Conn. (August 22, 2012) — The international humanitarian agency, Save the Children, will launch Fastathon LIVE 2012, its new campaign to address the hunger crisis in the Sahel region of West Africa, through a live stream broadcast from Mali and Westport on Thursday, August 23. Save the Children President & CEO Carolyn Miles will moderate the broadcast from Mali, along with hunger response program staff members and families who have benefitted from the assistance provided by Save the Children.

“When a hurricane or earthquake hits, it makes front page news,” said Miles. “But a slow onset emergency like a hunger crisis rarely gets into the headlines until many lives are lost. We are using live streaming technology and social media to show people that we can support these children and families, if we act now.”

Over 18 million people are facing hunger across the Sahel region of West Africa, which includes Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso and Mauritania, due to crop production shortages, abnormally high food prices and civil insecurity. Save the Children has worked in this region for more than 30 years and began operating a comprehensive response program at the start of this hunger crisis, treating malnourished children in nutrition centers, distributing supplementary food rations and helping families and communities to have more secure food sources through improved agricultural and livestock raising practices.

“In Mali alone, the food crisis is affecting 4.6 million people, and more than a third of the children are suffering from chronic malnutrition,” reported Miles, who is in Mali this week to see our response work first hand. “I’m seeing families who cannot provide their children with the nutritious foods they need to grow, physically and cognitively, and are forced to skip meals. Americans are extremely generous people, and I believe they will take action to help these children once they understand what happening in this part of the world.”

Joining Miles on the live stream broadcasts will be global gaming champion “Athene,” who is also in Mali to help mobilize the gaming community and other social networks to support this campaign. People can participate in the interactive broadcast at 12 noon Eastern Daylight Time, give up meals for a day or support someone who is fasting in order to help children at risk of malnutrition.

Actions and Donation Channels

Interviews: Available with Gary Shaye, Senior Director, Humanitarian Response

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Urgent Call for Humanitarian Access and Funds

Media Contact
Wendy Christian 203.465.8010

WESTPORT, Conn. (August 21, 2012) — More than one and a half million people in Syria have been driven from their homes by conflict and are in dire need of humanitarian assistance, warned today leading humanitarian organizations Save the Children and the Norwegian Refugee Council, with The Elders, a group of eminent global leaders. The letter to the United Nations and the League of Arab States comes days after former Algerian foreign Minister and diplomat Lakhdar Brahimi was appointed as Joint UN-Arab League Special Representative for Syria.

There are about ten times as many internally displaced people (IDPs) within Syria as there are registered refugees in neighboring countries, and yet they are not receiving the assistance or attention they need due to lack of access. Many of the displaced are being hosted by local communities but the growing number of those in need has now outstripped the capacity of local communities to support them. As a result, hundreds of thousands of people are living in very insecure conditions in public buildings such as schools, universities, mosques and churches.

“There is a danger that those displaced within Syria are being forgotten or overlooked. The violence and extreme restrictions on humanitarian access mean hundreds of thousands of people are at risk, especially pregnant women, children and the elderly. They are cut off from essential services and may not have enough to eat or drink. We urgently need to get into Syria to be able to help them,” said Mike Penrose, Save the Children’s Humanitarian Director.

Following the UN’s decision not to renew the mandate of its supervision mission in Syria, which expired Sunday, and Kofi Annan's decision to step down at the end of the month, aid agencies are urging the international community to urgently pursue an agreement with the Syrian authorities on securing humanitarian access to the country, and ensure sufficient funds are available.

The displacement crisis started in the countryside in the spring of 2011, following the protests in Damascus and the southern city of Daraa. It has now engulfed whole towns and cities, driving hundreds of thousands of people into further displacement, some people for the third or fourth time. Approximately 7% of the population is currently affected.

The large numbers of displaced are placing severe strains on host communities as they vie for increasingly scarce jobs and resources. Employment is hard to find, and agricultural activities have been severely disrupted resulting in an impending food crisis. Water shortages are also a grave concern. The FAO, WFP, and the Syrian Ministry of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform estimate that close to three million people will need assistance over the next three to six months.

“Innocent lives are being lost and thousands are suffering without help. We’re calling on the UN to remind all parties to the conflict of their legal obligation to prevent displacement and, where this is not possible, to ensure protection of internally displaced people. The Syrian government must allow access for humanitarian agencies as outlined in Annan’s six point plan, and international governments should ensure sufficient funding is available to support the humanitarian effort inside Syria. There is no time to lose,” said Elisabeth Rasmusson, Secretary General of the Norwegian Refugee Council.

How You Can Help Children in Syria

Donate to the Syria Children in Crisis Fund at www.savethechildren.org/syria 

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Sacred Heart School's Summer Students Sketch Storybook Illustrations for Save the Children's Global Literacy Program

Media Contacts
Save the Children: Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)
Sacred Heart Schools: Millie K. Lee 650.473.4004

Sacred Heart School's Summer Students Sketch Storybook Illustrations
for Save the Children's Global Literacy Program
Xiomara, 12, puts the finishing touches on her colorful painting during the illustration workshop. August 16, 2012. Photo Credit: Elliott Friedlander

WESTPORT, Conn. (August 21, 2012) — Students from high-tech Silicon Valley are going low-tech to boost reading skills of young children in developing countries.

Summer students at Sacred Heart Schools in Atherton, Calif. put pencil and paint to paper over the past two weeks in an illustration workshop to create storybook drawings for children in some of the most under-resourced pockets of Africa and Asia.

The illustration workshop is a pilot project of the global humanitarian organization Save the Children, and is sponsored by the Bay Area Tutorpedia Foundation. The illustrations will be used in handmade storybooks in Save the Children's Literacy Boost program, which aims to improve children's reading skills in the early grades in developing countries.

Through the workshop, Sacred Heart Schools' summer students in grades 5 to 7, sharpened their drawing skills, discovered new cultures and learned what objects they should sketch to make their stories come to life for children across the globe.

Storybooks are essential to helping young children build their literacy skills in the classroom and at home. But storybooks are either not prevalent or difficult to attain in many of the communities in developing countries where Save the Children works.

"In some villages, you won't find a single children's book. Yet research shows that children learn to read best when they are exposed to a variety of print materials to help them develop their language and literacy skills," said Elliott Friedlander, senior specialist in basic education and literacy research for Save the Children.

Teachers, Community Volunteers to Make Storybooks Using Students' Sketches

Save the Children partners with teachers and community volunteers to create books on culturally-appropriate topics in local languages, and using local materials, including reproductions of the workshop illustrations.

"Thanks to the creative talents of the students at Sacred Heart Summer School, Save the Children is closer to bringing the joy of reading to more young children around the globe," said Friedlander.

Since its launch in 2008, Save the Children's Literacy Boost program has reached nearly 66,000 young readers in more than 250 schools in eight countries, including Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nepal, Pakistan and Uganda. The agency is expanding its program this year to Burundi, South Africa and Zimbabwe.

Sacred Heart Schools, Atherton was founded in 1898 by the Society of the Sacred Heart (RSCJ) and is located on a 63-acre campus in Atherton, California. It is the only accredited preschool through twelfth grade school along the San Francisco peninsula with a total enrollment of approximately 1070 students on one campus. The School is a member of the Network of Sacred Heart Schools with 22 institutions in the United States; the Network continues the educational mission of the RSCJ whose members serve in over 44 countries.

Tutorpedia: Founded by two public high school teachers in 2009, The Tutorpedia Foundation's mission is to provide high-quality, personalized tutoring and related education services to underserved students. We carefully match students (grades K-12) with exceptional tutors, mentors, and instructors who are experts in their content areas and pedagogy. Instruction is student-centered and individualized, improving not only grades and test scores, but also student confidence and motivation. The Foundation believes that personalized, collaborative relationships are the key to closing achievement gaps, graduating more students from high school, and preparing more students for college, work, and life. Since its inception, Tutorpedia Foundation has provided more than 6,000 hours of tutoring and instruction to over 300 low-income and underperforming Bay Area students at no cost to the students or their families.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts

Wendy Christian, wchristian@savechildren.org, 203-465-8010
Abby Safirstein, asafirstein@savechildren.org, 203-221-4231 

Save the Children Calls on the National Government and International Community to Intensify Efforts to Address Crucial Needs of Children

MANILA, Philippines (August 20, 2012)– Most of heavily flooded low-lying areas in the National Capital Region, Region III (Bulacan, Pampanga, Tarlac provinces) and Region IV-A (Rizal and Laguna provinces) are still underwater after monsoon rains for the past two weeks battered the country, affecting 4.2 million people including more than 2.5 million children.

Even with reports that families have started going back to their homes, more than 212,000 people remain in 656 evacuation centers with limited access to safe and potable water, non-food items, sanitation facilities, and healthcare. Coastal areas, particularly those surrounding Laguna de Bay, may remain flooded for up to three months.

Anna Lindenfors, Country Director for Save the Children in the Philippines said: “As we expect around twelve more typhoons to hit the Philippines for the remainder of the year, it is likely that the flood water in these areas will not subside at all. The longer children and families stay in evacuation centers, the more they are exposed to unhealthy and unsafe conditions.”

“Children and adolescents have very specific needs and experiences that are different from adults, which should be given primary consideration. During emergencies, they are exposed to extreme situations which may be difficult to cope up with. Aside from meeting their basic needs, we should also provide emotional and developmental support to help them recover from traumatic experiences,” she explained.

This week, Save the Children has started setting up Child-Friendly Spaces (CFS) and Temporary Learning Spaces (TLS) for children and adolescents in evacuation centers in Laguna and Bulacan. These provide children and adolescents with a safe, designated area where they can play, learn, and express themselves under the supervision of trained adults. These also give the opportunity to detect, discuss and promote child protection issues in evacuation centers.

“Also, formal classes will need to resume as children should not be out of school for a long time. But we are looking at how this may displace flood-affected families who are staying in schools and are not yet able to go back to their homes,” Lindenfors said.

“Clearly, we need to come up with solutions that will deliver the best outcomes across all sectors for everyone, especially children,” she added.

To date, Save the Children has reached over 15,000 people in evacuation centers with water supplies, hygiene kits, household items and CFS sessions.

How You Can Help Children in the Philippines

Donate to the Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund at www.savethechildren.org 

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

Newborn baby Kaye receives a shot for an infection in an evacuation shelter.  Her mother remains in the hospital and her grandmother fled heavy flooding with seven grandchildren. Credit:  Save the Children.
Newborn baby Kaye receives a shot for an infection in an evacuation shelter. Her mother remains in the hospital and her grandmother fled heavy flooding with seven grandchildren. Credit: Save the Children.

Donate to the Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund

MANILA, Philippines. (August 10, 2012) — The lack of latrines and clean water in cramped evacuation centers in Manila and neighbouring provinces is putting hundreds of thousands of children at risk of disease, Save the Children warns.

"We have seen multiple cases of diarrhea, flu and skin rash in evacuation centers, all of which can spread very quickly if people do not have good hygiene practices, especially among children," said Anna Lindenfors, country director for Save the Children in the Philippines. "Nearly 300,000 people are packed into less than 500 centers, living under precarious conditions. Poor sanitation, lack of access to clean water and health services are all aggravating factors."

To improve the hygiene conditions in evacuation centers, Save the Children has begun relief distributions in the National Capital Region and Laguna, and will reach 1,500 families with initial aid packages, including cooking utensils and cleaning items, by the end of the week. The international humanitarian and development agency is also working to distribute 2,500 pre-made hygiene packages, with items including soap, shampoo and other toiletries.

On Tuesday, the Department of Health issued a warning on the potential outbreak of leptospirosis, a bacterial disease caused by contact with rat urine or feces. Officals have begun handing out preventative medicine to displaced people.

"The government has been vigilant about protecting the public from any disease outbreaks, but sanitation conditions need to improve quickly in order to protect children in the weeks ahead," said Anna Lindenfors. "Young infants in particular need clean and sanitary conditions as their immune systems are still weak, making them especially vulnerable to external conditions."

Save the Children has been working in the Philippines since 1981 and mounted a large-scale emergency response to typhoon Ketsana in 2009, and more recently, last year’s Typhoon Washi.

When emergency strikes, Save the Children aims to respond to critical needs of children and families inside and outside of evacuation centers, addressing concerns related to relief, child protection, education, health and nutrition—including water and sanitation, food security, and shelter.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

MANILA, Philippines. (Aug. 9, 2012) — Floods are sweeping much of the Philippines and have driven 332,000 children from their homes, Save the Children estimated.

Heavy monsoon rains have triggered the floods in the capital city of Manila and beyond, affecting almost 2 million people. About 185,000 children have taken shelter at evacuation centers where supplies to protect their health and wellbeing are urgently needed.

"Our teams have been out in the floodwaters, assessing the needs of the families affected so that we can rapidly scale up our response to get help to children. Children are at the evacuation centers and desperately need warm clothes, blankets, clean water and soap," said Save the Children Philippines Country Director Anna Lindenfors in Manila.

"The youngest children are especially vulnerable," she added.

Save the Children has pre-made aid packages on standby for use in floods and other emergencies, and is launching a response to assist the most vulnerable children and families affected by the floods.

Save the Children has been working in the Philippines since 1981 and mounted a large-scale emergency response to typhoon Ketsana in 2009, and more recently, last year's typhoon Washi.

When emergency strikes, Save the Children aims to respond to critical needs of children and families inside and outside of evacuation centers, addressing concerns related to relief, child protection, education, health and nutrition including water and sanitation, food security, and shelter.

In addition to Manila, the cities of Parañaque, Taguig, Makati, Marikina, Mandaluyong, San Juan, Pasay, Quezon, Valenzuela and Pasig are heavily flooded, while other provinces and cities such as Cavite, Bulacan, Laguna, Rizal, Las Pinas, Bataan, Pangasinan, La Union, Benguet, Pampanga, and Nueva Ecija are also experiencing intense rain and are severely flooded.

Donate to the Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (August 7, 2012) — Syrian families caught up in intensifying violence in the country are being split up as they flee the fighting, Save the Children has warned today.

The international humanitarian and development agency is working with Syrian refugees in Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq, and has found that families forced from their homes are being separated from one another as they flee the conflict, leaving thousands unsure of the fate of their loved ones.

More than half of Syrian refugees are children, and many say they have no idea what has happened to siblings, parents and other close relatives left behind in Syria. Some families were separated on the journey, while others decided to leave some relatives at home to protect their property. Children separated from relatives are much more vulnerable to the risks posed by the conflict, the aid agency says.

"Children in Syria are being left extremely vulnerable as families split up while struggling to reach safety. The dangers for these children, already horrific, are getting worse, and many are terrified for the relatives they have separated from," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children.

"Those who have reached the relative safety of neighboring countries are actually the lucky ones. We know there are likely to be thousands of children who have fled their homes but remain in Syria, and we cannot reach children there and attend to their needs. Full humanitarian access to Syria is urgently needed for the sake of these children," Miles said.

Fierce fighting within the country continues to force desperate families from their homes, with more than 200,000 people displaced from Aleppo alone in recent days, according to latest UN figures.

Children arriving in neighboring countries from Syria are frequently terrified by what they have seen and deeply anxious about the fate of those they have left behind.

Sophie Perreard, Save the Children’s program director in Lebanon said: 'Children crossing from Syria have been through terrible experiences. Save the Children is working to help them recover, setting up safe places to play, providing education to displaced children, distributing essential items, and making sure that families with babies and young children have the supplies they need.'

When displaced families separate, children are particularly vulnerable. Separated families often have no way of earning an income and arrive in a new country with nowhere to stay. Some refugees are afraid to register with authorities, believing they will be targeted in the conflict, and therefore miss out on support that would otherwise be available to them.

Save the Children is working with Syrian refugees in Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq, where aid agencies have been overwhelmed by a huge influx of families looking for safety as the situation inside Syria continues to deteriorate.

Despite the conflict in Syria attracting the world’s attention, humanitarian agencies have just a third of money required to meet the needs of refugees in the region.

Learn More About Our Work in Syria

Donate Now to Support Our Syria Children in Crisis Fund

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

Mellyca, 12, tracks her savings in this diary. She received the book when she opened a new youth savings account at Kenya Postbank, a YouthSave partner. Photo credit: Rani Deshpande for Save the Children.
Mellyca, 12, tracks her savings in this diary. She received the book when she opened a new youth savings account at Kenya Postbank, a YouthSave partner. Photo credit: Rani Deshpande for Save the Children.

WESTPORT, Conn. (July 26, 2012) — Teens in poor nations want to save larger amounts of money over the long-term in secure places to pay for their education or to start a small business, which can be used to bump them up into a better set of opportunities, according to a new Save the Children study released today.

"The perception is that teens living in poverty — many on less than $2 a day — have no money, let alone money to save," said Rani Deshpande, director of Save the Children's YouthSave program, which carried out the study on youth savings. "But, surprisingly, our research shows this is not true."

Save the Children interviewed more than 2,000 teens, from age 12 to 18, who are enrolled in or are out of school in predominantly low-income areas of Colombia, Ghana, Kenya and Nepal. The study looked at how teens get their money, how they spend their money and their attitudes about saving.

The study reveals that not only do teens in poor nations have money from allowances, gifts and part-time work, they are already routinely saving it, starting as early as age 12. The money they receive — in amounts as small as 50 cents a month — are often kept in insecure places at home such as piggy banks, inside furniture or under piles of clothing.

Savings Soon Spent

But the savings are usually only put aside for a short time-periods of around three months. Most teens say they dip into their savings to pay for basic needs such as school supplies and clothing.

"Many teens told us they often can't ask their parents for money every time they need basic items like a school notebook. Instead, they put aside what little money they can to buy these items when needed," said Deshpande.

Putting Away Money for the Future

While teens are already saving for short-term needs, they are seeking help to save more money for the future. According to the research, teens say they want to build up their savings in secure saving options that are private, simple and easily accessible to achieve their long term goals. Teens both in and out of school say they want to save for an education, while out-of-school teens say they also want to save to start a business.

Participants in the study also say they want advice on how to grow their money over time. Teens say they now mainly pick up their savings habits from watching others, especially their moms and grandmothers, or from learning the hard way, through bad experiences.

"The research reveals the potential for governments, businesses, and communities to step in and create savings tools that can help low-income kids save safely over the long-term and build their money management skills early in life," said Deshpande. "In most poor nations today, many existing savings options – from village savings and loans to bank savings accounts — are only offered to adults."

Read the entire study “What Do Youth Savers Want?”

The youth savings research was carried out by the YouthSave Consortium through the support of the MasterCard Foundation. The YouthSave Consortium is led by Save the Children in partnership with the Center for Social Development at Washington University in St. Louis, the New America Foundation, and the Consultative Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP).

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact:
Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O), 202.294.9700 (M)

Save the Children: South Sudanese Refugee Camps Overwhelmed as Tens of Thousands Arrive
Displaced children and their families gather while a meal is prepared, in Pibor. Photo credit: Yvonne Agengo/Save the Children

WESTPORT, Conn. (July 13, 2012) – The refugee crisis in South Sudan is worsening, with up to 2,000 children a day arriving at already over-crowded and flooded camps, Save the Children said today.

The refugees are converging on South Sudan's Unity and Upper Nile states, with many eating roots to survive the grueling journey. Some have even been forced to abandon elderly and weak relatives along the way. Seasonal rains have turned the region into a quagmire making the living conditions and the aid effort far more difficult.

Aid agencies working in the camps are struggling to provide clean water, food and shelter to thousands of new arrivals due to the scale of the influx, funding shortages and the weather conditions.

"Thousands of families are arriving in South Sudan hungry and terrified after walking for days to reach safety," said Jon Cunliffe, Save the Children's South Sudan country director. "People are coming just as heavy rains make it virtually impossible to access these areas to provide aid. The resources are not in place to meet the needs of everyone. The worst-case scenario is now a reality; we are witnessing a full-blown humanitarian crisis in one of the most remote places on earth."

Jamila Abdallah, a young mother who recently arrived in South Sudan, said about her journey: "There is no food, no water and no medicine. Many children and many elderly have died. We were surviving on roots we have dug from under the ground. People are hungry." The refugee influx comes on top of a severe hunger crisis affecting South Sudan. The UN estimates that 2.4 million people – more than a quarter of the population – will face food insecurity this year, doubling initial estimates, after a poor harvest and rampant inflation have seen food prices soar in recent months.

South Sudan declared independence from Sudan on July 9, 2011. The country is facing an economic crisis exacerbated by the shutdown of oil production, wiping out 98 percent of national income.

Save the Children has launched an emergency response in refugee camps in South Sudan, protecting vulnerable children and providing education to refugees. The aid agency is scaling up its programs in response to the recent influx of refugees.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O), 202.294.9700 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (July 5, 2012) — Somalia is facing a renewed crisis as poor rains and conflict threaten to push hundreds of thousands of children left vulnerable by last year's crisis back into a struggle for food, Save the Children has warned.

Last year's unprecedented relief effort saved the lives of thousands of Somali children. But the crisis forced hundreds of thousands of people from their homes, devastated their livelihoods and left them vulnerable to unpredictable rains and volatile market prices.

Now a combination of displacement, poor rains and a predicted late and below-average harvest may reverse Somalia's fragile recovery from last year's drought. The confluence of hardships highlights the challenges Somalis face coping with multiple, simultaneous shocks when many haven't recovered from last year's disaster.

Early warning systems predict that below-average rains will result in poor harvests in south-central Somalia, the epicentre of last year's emergency. Hardest hit will be the 1.4 million Somalis already displaced by drought and conflict, who are relying on a good harvest to keep food prices low.

Save the Children is calling for urgent funding to provide on-going emergency assistance and wants a fresh push from the international community to tackle the underlying causes of the crisis in Somalia.

"The incredible response to last year's crisis saved thousands of lives," said Sonia Zambakides, Humanitarian Director for Save the Children's Somalia program. "But that crisis has also left a huge amount of Somali families unable to cope with the effects of drought one year on.

"The underlying causes such as conflict, low rainfall and a lack of family income are still putting many Somali children at great risk."

Last year's crisis wiped out the incomes and savings of tens of thousands of Somalis and left a third of Somali families reliant on food relief. Meanwhile, increasing military activity continues to force families from their homes, further undermining their ability to cope and putting more pressure on overstretched aid programs.

Zambakides continued: "Unless we tackle the long-term factors driving hunger in Somalia, we will see more deadly crises in the years to come. We need a step-change in approach toward Somalia; a shift away from simply responding to hunger emergencies toward a long-term commitment to tackle the issues that give rise to them."

Save the Children has reached more than 3 million people across East Africa with emergency assistance since the East Africa crisis, providing food assistance, water, health care, livelihood support, protection and education to those affected by below average rains.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Athene Raises Funds on Behalf of DC Entertainment's We Can Be Heroes Giving Campaign

Media Contacts:
Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O), 202.294.9700 (M)
Ettore Rossetti 203.919.2215 (M) skype: ettorerossetti

FUNDRAZR_METER

WESTPORT, Conn. (July 5, 2012) – The online gaming community led by Athene – one of the world's top professional gamers – announced this week that they raised $1 million for Save the Children's work helping children affected by hunger in the Horn of Africa. Athene's efforts were made possible by a generous matching donation by DC Entertainment as part of We Can Be Heroes, a giving campaign that is focused on fighting the hunger crisis in Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia.

"On behalf of the children who have been served, we are immensely grateful to Athene and his gaming community for their heroic fundraising efforts and to DC Entertainment for their generous match" stated Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. "DC Entertainment is a force for good in the world."

Athene, who is known in the video game community as the first player to reach level 85 in World of Warcraft: Cataclysm, broadcast hitting the $1 million mark via video stream on his website www.athenelive.com. On June 17th, he also announced the achievement live on stage at DreamHack — the world's largest digital gaming festival — in Jönköping, Sweden.

Athene said on stage: "I don't see myself as a celebrity. I am just a gamer who got the opportunity to be a voice. People say that gamers don't have a life. This project … is writing Internet history. We're not slacktivists. We are the generation that is going to end poverty."

On March 25, Athene began the fundraiser for Save the Children. During his 85-day effort, during which he fasted for two weeks to raise awareness and support, more than 20,000 donations came in and some 2,000 individuals raised money for the cause. A matching contribution came from DC Entertainment's We Can Be Heroes giving campaign which supports the needs of the people affected by the hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa.

The $1 million donation is part of a growing trend among video game enthusiasts called "gaming for good." Athene and Save the Children broke new ground by streaming live video from Dadaab Refugee camp in Kenya. Gamers could see in real time the refugees their donations were helping. Donors interacted with the children via a moderated video chat while being acknowledged for their donations in real-time.

"This epic 'gaming for good' event represents the future of philanthropy with the convergence of social media technologies, gaming and philanthropy in a true triangulation of innovation," said Ettore Rossetti, Director of Internet Marketing Social Media for Save the Children.

Save the Children has reached almost 3.5 million people in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia since April 2011. The organization's programs focus on education, nutrition, health and child protection. Save the Children has reunited children with family members, delivered water to communities and fed malnourished children.


Media Assets:

Thank You Video by Save the Children
We Can Be Heroes Campaign Video
Athene's Video of Hitting $1 Million Milestone
We Can Be Heroes Blog


About We Can Be Heroes:


We Can Be Heroes is a giving campaign designed to raise awareness and funds for the hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa. Using the iconic Justice League characters from DC Entertainment, We Can Be Heroes aims to raise substantial funds for three humanitarian aid organizations working in Africa: Save the Children, International Rescue Committee, and Mercy Corps. DC Entertainment will match donations up to $1 million in total donations, and 50% of the purchase price from We Can Be Heroes products will go directly to saving lives. Learn more, donate and get involved at www.WeCanBeHeroes.org.

 

About DC Entertainment

DC Entertainment, home to iconic brands, DC Comics (Superman, Batman, Green Lantern, Wonder Woman, The Flash), Vertigo (Sandman, Fables) and MAD, is the creative division charged with strategically integrating its content across Warner Bros. Entertainment and Time Warner. DC Entertainment works in concert with many key Warner Bros. divisions to unleash its stories and characters across all media, including but not limited to film, television, consumer products, home entertainment and interactive games. Publishing thousands of comic books, graphic novels and magazines each year, DC Entertainment is the largest English-language publisher of comics in the world. In January 2012, DC launched We Can Be Heroes – a giving campaign featuring iconic Justice League super heroes – to raise awareness and funds to fight the hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa.

 

About Athene

Athene is one of the world's most famous record-breaking professional gamers. He holds several gaming world records including the first player to reach level 85 in World of Warcraft: Cataclysm and several records in Diablo 3 and livecasts daily at Athenelive.com. Note: Content is rated teen.

Media Contacts:

For We Can Be Heroes:

Nicole Stipp
212.584.5000


For Athene:

Reese Leysen
skype: reese015

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Organization mobilizes efforts to deliver children's supplies and provide emotional recovery support.

Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)

Save the Children

Washington, D.C. (June 30, 2012) — After closely monitoring the escalating wildfires that continue to devastate Colorado, Montana and a number of other states across the western part of the country, Save the Children is mobilizing essential supplies for families with young children. We are also mobilizing resources to provide critical psychosocial programs to support children's longer-term emotional recovery.

Of the thousands of people displaced from their homes by the wildfires, children are the most vulnerable. Save the Children has reached out to Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper and Montana Senator Jon Tester to offer our support. Partnering with local communities in Colorado, Montana and beyond, Save the Children intends to distribute essential infant and toddler supplies, such as strollers, portable cribs, diapers, baby wipes, and assorted hygiene supplies.

In addition, Save the Children knows from experience that many children will have a significant need for psychosocial and emotional recovery support. Families may also need assistance in accessing child care and out-of-school-time programs so that children can return to a normal routine and parents can go back to work, knowing their loved ones are safe.

Save the Children is committed to helping children and their families affected by disasters in the United States and around the world. Help put smiles back on the faces of children who've lost everything.

Support Save the Children's 2012 wildfire relief fund for Colorado, Montana and beyond

Text WILDFIRE to 20222 to give $10 to our relief efforts in Colorado, Montana and beyond.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

In the United States, Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 185,000 children last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (June 26, 2012) — Pregnancy is the biggest killer of teenage girls worldwide, with one million dying or suffering serious injury, infection or disease due to pregnancy or childbirth every year, Save the Children said today.

In a new report, Every Woman's Right: How family planning saves children's lives, the international humanitarian and development agency highlights the many ways that lives are saved when women can choose the timing and spacing of their pregnancies. Becoming pregnant too soon (less than 24 months) after a previous birth is dangerous for both mothers and babies. In fact, enabling access to family planning so that women can delay conception for at least three years after giving birth reduces risk of maternal and newborn complications and could save up to 1.8 million lives each year.

However, contraception is not easily available for many. Some 222 million women around the world who don't want to get pregnant currently don't have access to contraception. This year, an estimated 80 million unintended or mistimed pregnancies will occur in developing countries.

"As a mother, I know how valuable that recovery time after giving birth can be. What is more surprising is that delaying the next pregnancy dramatically reduces the risk of complications and death for newborns and mothers, which is critical," said Save the Children's President & CEO, Carolyn Miles.

"We encourage families to let their daughters complete school and delay marriage since those early pregnancies can be a death sentence. Our report highlights the important role of health workers in providing contraception to help families space births and how more years of education can help delay marriage – both of which save children's lives," Miles said.

World leaders are congregating in London next month for a family planning summit hosted by the UK government and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. This comes on the heels of a global Call to Action to end preventable child deaths within a generation, hosted by USAID with the governments of India and Ethiopia in mid-June. Save the Children is calling for policymakers to endorse this bold goal and sees family planning as a key part of the solution along with other investments in health, nutrition and girls education.

Meeting the entire global need for contraception could prevent 30 percent of maternal deaths and 20 percent of neonatal deaths in the developing world – potentially saving 649,000 lives a year.

"The U.S. has been a leader in helping to cut by nearly half the number of children who die each year from preventable or treatable causes. We need to keep investing in programs that we know save children's lives," Miles said.

The report also highlights:

  • Globally, one in five girls will have had a child by the age of 18.
  • Young mothers are likely to be poor, less educated and living in rural areas.
  • A woman's lifetime risk of maternal death – the probability that a 15 year old girl will ultimately die from a maternal cause – is 1 in 3,800 in developed countries but 1 in 150 in developing countries.
  • A national survey in Nigeria in 2005 found almost a third of women believed that certain methods of contraception could lead to female infertility.
  • Every $1 spent on family planning saves at least $4 that would be spent treating pregnancy-related complications.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Artist Ambassadors Jennifer Garner, Julianne Moore, and Randy Jackson Sign Pledge in Support of Organization's Efforts to Break the Cycle of Poverty.

Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)

Randy Jackson
"We all have to do our part to help turn around the childhood poverty crisis and make sure that every kid gets a fair start in life."
   ~ Randy Jackson

Washington, D.C., June 21, 2012 — An epidemic has swept across America, threatening the well-being of its most vulnerable residents, according to Save the Children, who launched today its Freedom from Poverty campaign to give a voice to the 16 million children bearing the brunt of the U.S. poverty crisis.

Artist ambassadors Jennifer Garner, Julianne Moore and American Idol judge Randy Jackson have already signed the Freedom from Poverty pledge, whose aim is to have 15,000 signatures from supporters by campaign's end on August 14.

"Today, one in four kids is living in poverty. But it doesn't have to stay that way," said Randy Jackson, who supported Save the Children's post-Hurricane Katrina relief efforts in New Orleans, La. "We all have to do our part to help turn around the childhood poverty crisis and make sure that every kid gets a fair start in life."

The goal of the Freedom from Poverty campaign is to shine a light on this crisis impacting a quarter of children across the United States who know all too well what it means to go without.

"Living in poverty can mean having little or no food on the table, no safe place to sleep at night, no electricity or running water," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children's President & CEO. "Poverty also means not having books to read and falling 18 months behind one's peers by age four, never catching up. It means being trapped in the cycle of poverty for life."

In addition to raising awareness of this hidden crisis, Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need. Through initiatives like U.S child sponsorship, children gain access to a quality education, books, computers, after-school learning, physical activities and healthy snacks.

From the foothills of Kentucky to the deserts of Arizona, U.S. sponsorship supports proven programs that are changing the future of children who are all too often forgotten. Children like Tracie Hays…

"My sponsors helped inspire me to achieve success. They encouraged me to go to school, try hard and do well so that doors would open in my future," said Hays, who benefited from Save the Children's sponsorship program as a child growing up in poverty-stricken rural Kentucky. Hays went on to graduate from high school with honors, receive a full college scholarship and complete a master's degree in education.

To learn more about Save the Children's Freedom from Poverty campaign and the U.S. Sponsorship program, visit: www.savethechildren.org/freedom. Text READ to 69866 to take the Freedom from Poverty Pledge.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

In the United States, Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 185,000 children last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Ajla Grozdanic, Save the Children, 202.262.7171 (M)
Stephanie Spanos, American Girl, 608.830.4496

American Girl logo

WASHINGTON, D.C. (June 21, 2012) — We know that fostering a lifelong love of reading is key to success in school and life for all children — but especially the 16 million living in poverty across the United States. That's why American Girl has partnered with Save the Children to spread the love of reading to girls across the country.

This summer, to celebrate books and encourage girls to keep their reading skills sharp while school is out, American Girl is introducing Read-a-palooza, a summer reading program created for girls ages 8 to 12. Read-a-palooza will benefit Save the Children's U.S. Programs through a book purchase donation.

"The learning loss that takes place over the summer months can have a significant impact on a child's academic success," said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO, Save the Children. "That's why Save the Children is proud to partner with American Girl in this effort to bridge the summer learning gap by encouraging children to read while school is out."

Now through September 3, 2012, $1 of every book purchased through American Girl (up to a maximum of $100,000) will support Save the Children's efforts to raise literacy rates in impoverished communities by providing basic education and equipping schools and teachers with reading materials. In addition, American Girl will make its third donation of books to Save the Children this fall, bringing the value of the company's total book donation to nearly $1.5 million.

To participate in Read-a-palooza, girls can visit www.americangirl.com/reading, where they can download colorful bookmarks and free book-related content, such as tips and materials for starting a book club. They'll also be able to do reading challenges and take fun, interactive quizzes. Girls can participate in Read-a-palooza by visiting an American Girl retail store, where free reading events will be offered all summer long.

For more information about Read-a-palooza and American Girl's partnership with Save the Children, visit www.americangirl.com/reading, where they can download free activities and book-related content, like tips for starting a book club, downloadable bookmarks, as well as take fun reading quizzes.

About Save the Children

Save the Children's U.S. Programs work to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to a quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters like hurricanes and wildfires strike, Save the Children is among the first on the ground ensuring the needs of children are being met.

Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 147,000 children and families in the United States last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

Information concerning Save the Children Federation, Inc., including financial, licensing or charitable purposes may be obtained, without cost, by calling 1.800.728.3843 or writing to Save the Children Federation, Inc. at 54 Wilton Road, Westport, Connecticut 06880.

About American Girl

American Girl

American Girl Brands is a wholly owned subsidiary of Mattel (NASDAQ:MAT), the world's leading toy company. Since American Girl's inception in 1986, the company has devoted its entire business to celebrating the potential of girls ages 3 to 12. American Girl encourages girls to dream, to grow, to aspire, to create, and to imagine through a wide range of engaging and insightful books, age-appropriate and educational products, and unforgettable experiences. In meeting its mission with a vigilant eye toward quality and service, American Girl has earned the loyal following of millions of girls and the praise and trust of parents and educators. To learn more about American Girl or to request a free catalogue, call 1.800.845.0005, or visit www.americangirl.com.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



"The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" Team Creates Campaign Video to Crowdsource up to $250,000 in Donations on CrowdRise

Media Contact:
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

A World with No Math

WESTPORT, Conn. (June 18, 2012) — Imagine a world with no math. What a wacky place it would be. But that is exactly what a team who work at "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" pondered in a volunteer project for a new Save the Children video starring Michael Boatman ("Anger Management"), Julie Bowen ("Modern Family"), Simon Helberg ("The Big Bang Theory") and John Oliver ("The Daily Show with Jon Stewart"). The video, released today, is part of a Save the Children online fundraising campaign through CrowdRise (www.crowdrise.com/AWorldWithNoMath) to bring a new community-wide math program to elementary school children struggling to learn basic math in Africa and Asia.

"As a child who loved learning but struggled with math, I dreamed about a world in which I'd never have to study Algebra again," said Michael Boatman. "But as an adult, I've learned the value of numeracy in an increasingly numbers-driven world. What would the human race achieve without math? In the words of Dean Wermer from Animal House: "Zero. Point. Zero."

"Math is essential to helping children succeed in school and the real world," said Carolyn Miles, president & CEO of Save the Children. "While carrying out our community-wide program to boost children's reading skills, we discovered the pressing need to build up children's math skills as well. We were alarmed to find through our research that young children could not master simple math problems even after several years of schooling.

"To close this gap, Save the Children decided to launch its first global education program focused on math in remote, poor corners of the globe. In addition to supporting kids with math skills they need for daily tasks like counting cattle, our program aims to empower children to break free from the clutches of poverty and take hold of opportunities to change their own lives," added Miles.

Campaign Aims to Raise $250,000

Save the Children tapped the power of crowdsourcing for social good on CrowdRise, founded by Edward Norton, Shauna Robertson and Robert and Jeffro Wolfe, to help boost support for young, budding mathematicians around the globe. The "A World with No Math" CrowdRise campaign, which seeks to raise$250,000, will run through August 18.

Save the Children's new math program, called Numeracy Boost, will focus on teaching children basic math skills both in and out of school. With the funds raised through the "A World with No Math" campaign, Save the Children will roll out the math program in Bangladesh and Malawi in 2012, measuring what students already know about math, giving teachers concrete skills in math to help develop their students' math knowledge and engaging parents, volunteers and children in community-wide math activities.

Through the "A World with No Math" Twitter promotion, donors to the campaign can receive some awesome math gifts like rulers, calculators, protractors and measuring tape autographed by the team of celebrities featured in the video, or an outgoing cell phone message by movie-trailer voiceover king, Richard Green, who lent his talent to "A World with No Math" video. Use #math to follow the updates and join the conversation.

Fundraising for Save the Children's "A World with No Math" campaign is as easy as 1,2,3:

  1. Go to www.crowdrise.com/AWorldwithNoMath
  2. Select the fundraising page for any of your favorite actors/comedians backing the campaign.
  3. Click on the donate button and enter the amount of your gift. Do the math and watch the donations add up.

About CrowdRise

CrowdRise is a fundraising site dedicated to the idea that raising money for charity and giving back has got to be fun. CrowdRise's custom-built platform and game mechanics provide fundraisers, charities and events with a unique way to raise the most money for their causes and share compelling philanthropic stories with their personal networks. The site lets anyone turn their friends into an active base of donors for any cause.

In 2011, CrowdRise topped Mashable's list of "Most Innovative Crowdfunding Platforms" and was named a "Top 25 Best Global Philanthropist" by Barron's. CrowdRise was founded by actor and activist Edward Norton, producer Shauna Robertson, and the founders of Moosejaw, Robert and Jeffro Wolfe.

Thousands of charitable organizations, events, celebrities and every day donors have made CrowdRise their philanthropic base for giving back.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O), 202.294.9700 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (June 12, 2012) – Save the Children released new figures today that show the food crisis in West Africa has hit a tipping point: If aid isn't delivered to the poorest families in the most vulnerable zones in Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso and Niger, families may not be able to survive the lean season.

In pockets of Mauritania, some people are missing an estimated 80 percent of their basic food needs for the months of June and July. Since January, many have been facing a food deficit.

Already more than 64,000 Malians have fled to neighboring Mauritania to escape fighting and increased food prices in the restive north of their country. Last month, between 600 and 1,000 Malian refugees were arriving daily at the M'bera refugee camp in southeast Mauritania.

Across the Sahel, the situation is grave:

  • In Gorgolwilaya, Mauritania, the poorest families are missing 80 percent of their basic food needs for the months of June and July. Between July and September, Save the Children estimates the families will not have 65 percent of what they need to survive.
  • In the Ioba Province of Burkina Faso, Save the Children's analysis shows that the poorest families will be unable to meet 75 percent of their food needs in August.
  • In Bandiagara Cercle in the Mopti region of Mali, the poorest families have less than 40 percent of the food they need to survive from June to September; they have already been facing a deficit since the beginning of April.

In response to the crisis, Save the Children has scaled up its emergency operations in the Sahel, but the organization has a funding shortfall of almost $40 million. They hope to close that gap and raise extra funds to bring help to 1.5 million people – including almost a million children – most urgently in need.

"The situation in the Sahel is desperate," says Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. "In countries like Niger, families are struggling to survive on next to nothing, and children are paying the price. Our analysis shows how much worse it will get without additional support. The time to act is now. We are asking donors not to wait any longer. Any further delays are sure to cost additional lives of children. We know how to prevent those deaths if we have the means."

With the lean season now starting, Save the Children warns the worst is yet to come.

"For months now, families have been telling us they have next to nothing to eat. In Mali, we know that some families are eating only once a day. Our analysis shows just how bad the situation has become and confirms our worst fears: a major emergency is now upon us," added Miles. "Last year's crisis in the Horn of Africa taught us you can't wait. People need our help now."

Readers may visit www.savethechildren.org/west-africa-hunger-1 to support our efforts in West Africa.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Newborns account for 40% of child deaths, but only 6% of world’s foreign assistance for maternal and child health mentions them, according to Save the Children’s pioneering new report on newborn survival

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

WASHINGTON (June 12, 2012) — Save the Children has released a pioneering report on newborn survival over the last decade that shows the world has greatly overlooked a key area for reducing child deaths—newborn care. Download report highlights

The world has achieved remarkable progress on reducing child deaths—from 12.4 million in 1990 to 7.6 million in 2010—but that progress isn’t reaching newborn babies at the same pace, the report shows. As a result, newborns (infants in the first month of life) now account for more than 40 percent of child deaths. However, the new report finds that globally only 0.1 percent of official development assistance for maternal and child health exclusively targets newborns, and only 6 percent mentions newborns at all—despite 3.1 million newborn babies dying each year.

“We must make sure to focus global efforts on when are kids are dying. Shockingly, this is right at the start of their lives when they are newborn babies,” said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. “This week’s “Child Survival Call to Action” in Washington presents a tremendous opportunity for world leaders to finish what they started and end preventable child deaths. They must make babies a core focus to achieve that.”

Miles added: “Save the Children applauds the U.S., Indian and Ethiopian governments for hosting this high-level forum and the Obama Administration for its commitment to continuing essential and effective U.S. leadership on child survival.”

To get involved, sign Save the Children’s petition urging world leaders to end preventable child deaths HERE.

The June 14-15 forum in Washington comes as Save the Children’s major new report, “A Decade of Change for Newborn Survival,” is published in the medical journal, Health Policy and Planning. Sixty main authors and 90 contributors collaborated for three years on a first-of-its-kind analysis of newborn health around the world and what is needed to speed up progress on ending newborn deaths. From 2000 to 2010 newborn deaths dropped from 3.7 million to 3.1 million annually.

The report shows political will to reach the poorest families with the most effective interventions for newborn health has had dramatic results in low-income countries such as Bangladesh, Malawi and Nepal. All three are on track to meet the 2015 target of Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing child deaths by two thirds since 1990, and all have reduced newborn deaths at about double the rate of neighboring countries.

African families have the highest risk of newborn deaths and it would take 150 years at current rates of progress to achieve newborn death rates on par with the United States and Europe.

Other report findings include:

  • Maternal mortality is declining faster than before, but newborn mortality is declining at half that rate—showing that improved maternity services are not enough to combat threats to newborn survival. Declines in newborn mortality rates are also 30 percent slower than those of children under 5 who survive the newborn period.
  • From 2003 to 2008, official development assistance doubled for maternal, newborn and child health in the 68 countries with the most newborn deaths, but only 6 percent of this funding mentioned the word “newborn” and only 0.1 percent included specific newborn care interventions.
  • Family planning—i.e., increased access to voluntary contraception—has led to reductions in newborn deaths, which often relate to too short a time between births or the youth of a mother. Prime examples are Nepal and Bangladesh, where the average number of babies per woman has been reduced by 50 percent.
  • 10 countries—including India and Ethiopia—account for two-thirds of neonatal deaths
  • While economic growth is often linked to improved newborn survival, some of the world’s poorest countries have achieved tremendous progress in both newborn and child survival. These include Malawi in Africa and Nepal in South Asia, both on track to meet MDG4, and Sri Lanka, which, despite conflict there, provides a dramatic example of halving deaths due to preterm birth.
  • The new report includes comprehensive analyses of how Bangladesh, Nepal and Malawi are leaders in reducing newborn deaths, how Uganda has made strides in policy change for newborns, and how in Pakistan national partnerships and champions have kept newborn health on the agenda despite challenges including earthquakes and floods.
  • More than 75 percent of newborn deaths could be prevented in 2015 with universal coverage of high-impact interventions like Kangaroo Mother Care (wrapping newborns in skin-to-skin contact with their mothers for warmth and improved breastfeeding), antibiotics for babies with infections, exclusive breastfeeding, and other basic care.

Save the Children urges world leaders gathered at this week’s high-level forum to draw on these findings.

The “Child Survival Call to Action” aims to build on progress achieved in pursuit of the 2015 Millennium Development Goal on reducing child deaths with a global roadmap to reach new goals—notably, reducing child deaths to fewer than 20 per 1,000 births in every country by 2035. Currently 53 children under age 5 die per 1,000 births globally, 40 percent of them newborns. Forum participants will include 700 prominent leaders from government, the private sector, faith-based organizations and civil society, including Save the Children. Read the full report

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world.

“A Decade of Change for Newborn Survival” was spearheaded by Save the Children’s Newborn Lives program, which is supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and works in partnership with countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America to reduce newborn mortality and improve newborn health.

Learn more about Save the Children’s campaign for newborn and child survival at www.EveryBeatMatters.org.

    highest death rates for newborn babies
     



    Oscar Feldenkreis, Reynold Levy, Shaquille O'Neal and John A. Thain to Receive "Father of the Year" Awards at Annual Luncheon on June 14th

    Media Contacts
    Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)
    Michael McMullan/Joy Murphy, Berns Communications Group, 212.994.4660

    FOTY Logo

    WASHINGTON D.C. (June 11, 2012) — Save the Children is proud to announce that the leader of its U.S. Programs division, Mark K. Shriver, will host the 71st Annual Father of the Year Awards. The event will take place at the Sheraton New York Hotel on Thursday, June 14, 2012, and will include a VIP press reception at 11:15 a.m., followed by a luncheon to be held at 12 p.m.

    Recently, the National Father's Day Council announced that the 2012 "Father of the Year" honorees will include Oscar Feldenkreis, President CEO of Perry Ellis International Inc., Reynold Levy, President of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, Shaquille O'Neal, TNT Commentator, four-time NBA Championship Winner, and three-time Finals MVP, and John A. Thain, Chairman and CEO of CIT Group Inc.

    "We are thrilled to have Mark Shriver, past 'Father of the Year' honoree and host, return to serve as Master of Ceremonies at our 71st Annual Father of the Year Awards," said Dana Verrill, Executive Director of the National Father's Day/Mother's Day Council, Inc. "Mark Shriver's philanthropic efforts have helped to improve the lives of 147,000 children across the country. He is a true inspiration to fathers everywhere, from his dedication to Save the Children to his passion and love for his family."

    Mark K. Shriver

    Mr. Shriver developed Save the Children's early childhood development, literacy and health programs, which benefit children living in some of the most impoverished regions of the United States. Mr. Shriver also created Save the Children's domestic emergency programs in 2005 to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children before, during, and after disaster strikes. He led a national coalition that convinced Congress to create the National Commission on Children and Disasters and was appointed to the Commission by Senator Harry Reid (D-NV). He was elected chairperson by his fellow commissioners and served in that role for the life of the Commission (2008-2011).

    He was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates from 1994 to 2002. In 1988, Mr. Shriver founded the innovative Choice Program, which serves delinquent and at-risk youth through intensive, community-based counseling. Mr. Shriver subsequently created The Choice Jobs Program, Inc., a private non-profit that trains, places and supports former Choice clients in jobs, as well as The Choice Middle Schools Program, a model for keeping at-risk middle school children in school.

    Mr. Shriver received his B.A. from The College of the Holy Cross in 1986 and a Masters in Public Administration from Harvard University in 1993. He has written a memoir called "A Good Man: Rediscovering My Father, Sargent Shriver" which will be published in June 2012 by Henry Holt. Mr. Shriver resides in Bethesda, Maryland with his wife, Jeanne, and their three children, Molly, Tommy and Emma.

    As part of its commitment to support meaningful philanthropies dealing with issues affecting mothers, fathers and children, the National Father's Day/Mother's Day Council, Inc. has donated more than $32 million to date to meaningful charities nationwide.

    For tickets and sponsorship information, please contact the Council office at 212.594.5977 or visit www.momanddadday.com.

    About Save the Children's U.S. Programs

    Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need – access to a quality education, healthy foods and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

    Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 147,000 children and families in the United States last year alone. For more information visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

    Information concerning Save the Children Federation, Inc., including financial, licensing or charitable purposes may be obtained, without cost, by calling 1.800.728.3843, writing to Save the Children Federation, Inc. at 54 Wilton Road, Westport, Connecticut 06880.

    About The National Father's Day Council

    The National Father's Day Committee is part of the Father's Day/Mother's Day Council, Inc., a non-profit membership association that has as its mission the recognition and awarding of honors to role model contemporary Fathers and Mothers, while at the same time contributing to issues affecting the life and well-being of men, women and families. Past honorees have included Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan, Generals Douglas MacArthur, Colin Powell and Norman Schwarzkopf, sports notables Dwyane Wade, George Forman and Steve Young, and communications leaders Tim Russert and Brian Williams. To learn more about The National Father's Day Council, visit our website at www.momanddadday.com.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    In Light of National Hurricane Preparedness Week (May 27-June 2), Save the Children Releases Expert-Approved Tips to Help Kids Deal with Disasters

    Media Contact
    Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M) Hurricane Preparedness

    Washington, D.C., May 24, 2012 — Today, federal forecasters released their outlook for the upcoming storm season, predicting up to eight hurricanes, including one to three classified as major-strength, Category 3 storms. With the hurricane season officially beginning on June 1, Save the Children wants to put disaster preparedness for children in the nation's spotlight.

    "Save the Children knows from experience that disasters can cause fear, anxiety and stress in children, which can last long after the initial impact," said Jeanne-Aimée De Marrais, Domestic Emergencies Advisor for Save the Children. "That's why we have to do everything we can to minimize the emotional effect of such traumatizing events on children and provide the support they need."

    Just in time for Hurricane Preparedness Week from May 27 to June 2, Save the Children is releasing tips to help children cope in the face of disaster. Based upon Save the Children's years of domestic and international experience of coming to the aid of children in emergencies, these tips can be used as a guide for parents to support their loved ones in the event of a crisis.

    10 Tips to Help Kids Cope with Disasters

    1. Limit TV time. Watching television reports on disasters can overwhelm younger children who may not understand an event is being replayed and instead think the disaster is happening over and over again. Overexposure to coverage of the events affects teenagers and adults as well.
    2. Listen to your children carefully. Emotional stress results in part when a child cannot give meaning to dangerous experiences. Begin a dialog to help them gain a basic understanding that is appropriate for their age and responds to their underlying concerns.
    3. Give children reassurance. Let them know that if any emergency or crisis should occur, your primary concern will be their safety. Make sure they know they are being protected.
    4. Be alert for significant changes. Be aware of changes in sleeping patterns, eating habits,
      concentration, wide emotional swings or frequent physical complaints without apparent illness. They will likely subside within a short time but if prolonged, we encourage you to seek professional support and counseling.
    5. Expect the unexpected. As children develop, their intellectual, physical and emotional capacities change. Younger children will depend largely on their parents to interpret events, while older children and teenagers will get information from a variety of sources that may not be as reliable. While teenagers seem to have more adult capacities to recover, they still need extra love, understanding and support to process these events.
    6. Give your children extra time and attention. They need your close, personal involvement to comprehend that they are safe and secure. Talk, play and listen to them. Find time to engage in special activities for children of all ages.
    7. Be a model for your child. Your child will learn how to deal with these events by seeing how you deal with them. Base the amount of self-disclosure on the age and developmental level of each of your children. Explain your feelings but remember to do so calmly.
    8. Watch your own behavior. Make a point of showing sensitivity toward those impacted by the disaster. This is an opportunity to teach your children that we all need to help each other.
    9. Help your children return to normal activities. Children almost always benefit from activity,
      goal orientation and sociability. Ensure that your child's school environment is also returning to normal patterns and not spending great amounts of time discussing the crisis.
    10. Encourage your child to do volunteer work. Helping others can give your child a sense of control, security and empathy. In the midst of crisis, adolescents and youth can emerge as active agents of positive change.

    About Save the Children's U.S. Programs

    Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to a quality education, healthy foods and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters like hurricanes and wildfires strike, Save the Children is among the first on the ground ensuring the needs of children are being met.

    Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 147,000 children and families in the United States last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Save the Children Statement on G8

    Media Contact
    Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O), 202.294.9700 (M)

    Take action and sign our petition now

    WESTPORT, Conn. (May 19, 2012) — "Save the Children welcomes the G8 "New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition," but leaders must not allow the Eurozone crisis to derail their leadership needed to fulfill its promise. G8 leaders can't let the economic crisis in Europe cast a dark shadow over the bright promise they rolled out with African leaders this weekend.

    "The European economic crisis has taken a toll on development aid levels, and it seems to have tempered the resolve of the G8 to maintain in the future the stepped-up effort it began in 2009.

    "While focusing on global economic concerns, G8 leaders did well to underscore the importance of food and nutrition security for Africans. Their new focus on nutrition and bringing new players to the table — particularly the private sector — has reinvigorated the fight against hunger and malnutrition.

    "While acknowledging the importance of continued public investment in achieving its goals, the G8's conclusion leaves room for its members to cut back their funding. Save the Children calls on G8 members to not only fulfill any remaining pledges from 2009, but to commit to at least maintaining that level of funding moving forward.

    "Save the Children applauds the G8 for a strong accountability report. There is greater detail about whether leaders have kept their promises and the impact of those investments. To promote even greater accountability through public discussion, the report should be released a month before the summit.

    "The New Alliance should maintain a high level of transparency and accountability for both public and private partners. The agency also calls on the G8 to ensure strong local civil society participation in the Leadership Council. The people benefitting from this initiative must have a voice in its design.

    "Save the Children calls on G8 leaders to quickly expand the New Alliance beyond Ghana, Tanzania and Ethiopia. The scale of the problem – and the potential pay offs – are so huge, that these three countries need to be the starting line, not the finish line.

    "Finally, Save the Children strongly backs Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's assertion that setting a global target to reduce stunting is possible, and calls on G8 leaders to come together with other world leaders to adopt a global target and ensure that food security efforts deliver both on poverty and malnutrition."

    —Michael Klosson, Save the Children's Vice President of Policy and Humanitarian Response

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Save the Children says G8 Leaders Must Put Nutrition at Center of Talks

    Media Contact
    Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O), 202.294.9700 (M)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (May 18, 2012) — As G8 leaders prepare to meet at Camp David later this week, Save the Children says that months of warnings have failed to prevent a serious malnutrition crisis sweeping Niger.

    The charity said today that they are now shifting their focus to crisis response. Despite efforts from the Niger government, some donors and humanitarian groups to prevent the emergency, aid agencies have raised only half of their cash target needed to protect the Sahel nation's beleaguered population. Throughout West Africa, more than 18 million people are affected by food insecurity with over 1 million children at risk of severe acute malnutrition.

    Analysis carried out by the aid agency, which takes into account Niger government statistics, has found that a vast majority of families in the worst affected areas do not have access to enough food to survive the coming season without help.

    "Families are resorting to desperate measures," said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. "Many have left their villages in search of work in cities. Husbands and sons have left to neighboring countries to find work. Thousands of children now need medical treatment for malnutrition, and we think those numbers will rise as the situation deteriorates."

    The grim news comes not only on the eve of the G8, but as President Obama delivers a keynote speech on Friday on food security, alleviating poverty and promoting agricultural development in Africa. His audience at the symposium in Washington D.C. will include a number of African heads of State. Food security is on the agenda at Camp David, but Save the Children is concerned that leaders will shy away from making bold commitments to tackle malnutrition. As well as the food emergencies happening in parts of West and East Africa, a quarter of the world's children are suffering from chronic malnutrition, fuelled in part by a lack of affordable, nutritious food.

    "Children need not only enough to eat, but enough of the right sort of food and nutrition during their first two years of life," said Miles. "If they don't get that, everything from their ability to learn to their lifetime earning potential is affected. A food security package announced at the G8 must have nutrition at its core."

    This means millions of children are not getting the right vitamins, minerals and nutrients within the first few years of their life, restricting their mental and physical growth – a condition known as stunting.

    "Globally, the direct cost of malnutrition is estimated at $20 to $30 billion per year. An investment in nutrition makes economic sense. G8 leaders must make a firm commitment to drastically reducing the number of chronically malnourished children in years to come," Miles said.

    Save the Children has written to G8 leaders asking them to make stunting a centerpiece of any food-security initiative. The international community along with the organization is calling for a 40 percent reduction in stunting by 2025.

    The G8's flagship food security initiative signed in L'Aquila, Italy, in 2009 is set to expire at the end of this year but has yet been fully delivered.

    Early indications suggest that a new package will be announced but Save the Children is concerned that the focus will be more on agriculture projects that focus on the volume of food produced, rather than focusing on the nutritional quality of that food and other actions that need to support nutrition.

    The emergency in Niger is a sign of what can happen if hunger is not tackled before it is too late. Immediate action to reduce the number of malnourished children around the world can help millions fulfil their potential and protect families in lean seasons to come.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    G8 Initiative Boosts Attention to Nutrition but Lacks Target for Helping Malnourished Children

    Take action and sign our petition now

    Media Contact
    Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O), 202.294.9700 (M)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (May 18, 2012) — At a time when a billion people go to bed hungry every night, Save the Children applauds President Obama for refocusing world attention on the "injustice of chronic hunger" and the importance of nutrition in a child's first thousand days.

    Save the Children welcomes G8 leaders' plans to lift 50 million people out of poverty and to address the global hunger and malnutrition crisis, which is devastating the lives of millions of children around the world.

    Nutrition is an element of the initiative, but leaders missed an opportunity to take even bolder steps to tackle chronic malnutrition, which affects 171 million children every year. Boosting agriculture and private sector involvement is crucial to food security - but it is not enough. It's not just about growing economies - but growing kids. Children need the right kind of food and nutrition to help them thrive.

    Without setting a concrete G8 target for reducing chronic malnutrition, there is no way in which global leaders' and their partners can be held accountable over the course of this new initiative.

    G8 leaders must build on these steps no later than their London summit next year: many young lives depend on their strong leadership.

    For more on Save the Children's take on the G8 and nutrition, visit www.savethechildren.org/child-survival

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contacts
    Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843
    Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (May 9, 2012) — Yesterday, to mark the week of Global Mother's Day, Save the Children held its first ever live interactive online video conference with influential Global Mothers from the worlds of Bollywood, Nollywood, journalism and literature. The event drew in viewers from over 70 countries — including Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Bangladesh, South Korea, Sudan, Ivory Coast and Myanmar — and reached almost a million on Twitter. The event was in support of the launch of Save the Children's thirteenth State of the World's Mothers Report. This year, the report focused on raising awareness of the #HiddenCrisis of malnutrition — the underlying cause of at least a fifth of maternal mortality and more than a third of child deaths.

    The influential mothers attending the conference included Arianna Huffington, editor of the Huffington Post, Shabana Azmi, Bollywood Star from India, Joke Silva, Nollywood Star from Nigeria, Jaishree Misra, Indian Author and was chaired by Carolyn Miles, CEO of Save the Children US. The public can watch a video recording of the chat here.

    "I became a mother late in life. I was 38 when I had my first daughter and 40 when I had my second," said Arianna Huffington. "I can say from personal experience, how much it increased my capacity for empathy, compassion and sense of solidarity with mothers from wherever in the world, whatever their circumstances."

    Over the hour of the conference, the moms answered live questions from Twitter about motherhood, improving health and nutrition and ways to raise awareness and make change happen.

    When asked why India's wealth wasn't trickling down to its poor, Shabana Azmi, Bollywood Star from India answered: "It comes as a huge shock to me that we have a woman President but the number of women we lose due to pregnancy related issues is more than in the whole of Europe for a whole year. That's equivalent to having 400 airplane crashes a year. Can you imagine? But it's because it's poor rural women who are dying that no-one's paying any attention. The answers are there — such as trained health workers — it just requires political will. It can be done."
    Nollywood star Joke Silva supported this and said "As with India, we also have a problem with political will in Nigeria"

    The discussion turned to what can be done to raise awareness and garner political attention. Actress Joke says film is a powerful medium which can combine entertainment with educational messages about good governance and political will and ethical health care. Jaishree Misra said her work includes motherhood issues but she does not campaign through her novels, however, she tries to use the subtle approach to change hearts and minds.

    Huffington continued: "Those of us in the West who have a much easier time in terms of pregnancy and childbirth are still plagued with guilt for being working mums as most of us are. Therefore the issues around motherhood start with the crisis that those at the bottom of the ladder are experiencing but continues in different psychological and emotional degrees across every country."

    Over the course of the live conference, Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children US, asked questions taken straight from Twitter. Twitter users following #SOWM and #HiddenCrisis reached almost one million over the course of the day.

    "We were thrilled to have the opportunity to discuss these important issues with influential women around the globe," said Miles. "This call to action for mothers in need engaged people in more than 70 countries, who tuned in to learn how they can partner with Save the Children to make real and lasting change."

    Individuals wanting to support Save the Children's Newborn and Child Survival campaign can visit www.savethechildren.org/world-mothers. Visitors are encouraged to sign a petition to calling on world leaders commit to saving children's lives and can also find a full copy of the report and additional information.

    For more information, and for graphics and charts, social media assets, case studies, photos, footage or interviews, please contact media listed above.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Save the Children's thirteenth State of the World's Mothers report shows Niger as the worst place to be a mother in the world.
    State of the World's Mothers 2012: See the full interactive online report.

    New Findings Show Breastfeeding Could Prevent One Million Child Deaths Per Year

    Media Contacts
    Colleen Barton Sutton 703.203.7843
    Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (May 8, 2012) — Save the Children's thirteenth State of the World's Mothers report shows Niger as the worst place to be a mother in the world — replacing Afghanistan for the first time in two years. Norway comes in at first place. The Best and Worst Places to Be a Mom ranking, which compares 165 countries around the globe, looks at factors such as a mother's health, education and economic status, as well as critical child indicators such as health and nutrition. This year, the United States ranks 25th.

    "While the US has moved up in the rankings, ahead of last year's 31st place, we still fall below most wealthy nations," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "A woman in the US is more than 7 times as likely to die of a pregnancy-related cause in her lifetime than a woman in Italy or Ireland. When it comes to the number of children enrolled in preschools or the political status of women, the United States also places in the bottom 10 countries of the developed world."

    This year, ahead of a crucial G8 meeting where President Obama is expected to discuss food and agriculture, the State of the World's Mothers report focuses on nutrition as one of the key factors in determining mothers' and their children's well-being. Malnutrition is the underlying cause of at least a fifth of maternal mortality and more than a third of child deaths.

    Of the ten countries at the bottom of Save the Children's annual index, seven are in the midst of a food crisis. Niger, in bottom place, is currently in the grip of a worsening hunger situation, threatening the lives of a million children. Four of the bottom ten countries have seen an increase in stunting over the past two decades — where children's mental and physical growth is permanently blighted by malnutrition.

    The report details a vicious cycle of young mothers, who may themselves have been stunted in childhood, going on to give birth to underweight babies who have not been adequately nourished in the womb. If a mother is impoverished, overworked, poorly educated and in poor health, she may not be able to feed the baby adequately, with largely irreversible effects. Save the Children notes that in sub-Saharan Africa, up to 20% of women are classified as excessively thin, while that figure rises to up to 35 percent in South Asia. The report highlights that the best method for breaking this cycle and protecting the pregnant mother and her baby from malnutrition is to focus on the first 1000 days starting from pregnancy.

    Save the Children called for more global action to tackle the cycle of maternal and child malnutrition when G8 leaders gather in Camp David in two weeks' time. "The 2012 State of the World's Mothers report shows clearly that this crisis of chronic malnutrition has devastating effects on both mothers and their children," said Miles. "We urgently need global leadership on the malnutrition issue, so that policies and programs are put in place to ensure the health and survival of mothers and their babies."

    In new research for the report, Save the Children found that the simple measure of supporting mothers to breastfeed could save one million children's lives a year. Yet the report also shows that less than 40% of all infants in developing countries receive the full benefits of exclusive breastfeeding. This is due, in part, to countries lacking strong commitment and complimentary programs that enable mothers to breastfeed. When the two do combine, the report shows that it can have success even in low-income countries, as it has done in Malawi and Madagascar.

    "Our research shows that a mother's breast milk — one single nutrition intervention — can save a million children's lives each year," said Miles. "All mothers should have the support they need to choose to breastfeed if they want to. Breastfeeding is good for babies no matter where they live, but in developing countries, especially those without access to clean water, breastfeeding can be a matter of life or death."

    Policy Recommendations:

    • The G8 delivers bold commitments to tackle the global hidden crisis of chronic malnutrition, blighting the lives of millions of mothers and children.
    • All governments make fighting malnutrition a priority, setting targets for their own countries and around the world.
    • Developing country governments should scale up nutrition programs around the first 1000 days, from a mother's pregnancy to the child's second birthday.
    • Developing country governments must commit and fund national nutrition plans of action — including breastfeeding — that are aligned with plans for maternal and child health.
    • Donor countries should continue to keep their commitments to deliver their international assistance budgets, so that governments can continue to invest in global health and development, including nutrition.

    Individuals who want to support Save the Children's Newborn and Child Survival campaign can visit www.savethechildren.org/world-mothers and sign our petition to help world leaders commit to saving children's lives.

    For more information, graphics and charts, social media assets, case studies, photos, footage or interviews, please contact media listed above.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contacts
    Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)
    Hannah Brencher 203.824.2488 (M)

    Academy Award-Winner Introduced at Celebration of Hope Event in Greenwich, Conn.

    Fourth Hour of TODAY Show's Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb Co-Host Benefit for Save the Children's Early Childhood Education Programs

    Academy Award-winning actress Jennifer Connelly joins Save the Children as its newest Artist Ambassador, seen here at the Celebration of Hope event on May 4, 2012. Photo Credit: Kit Kittle.
    Academy Award-winning actress Jennifer Connelly joins Save the Children as its newest Artist Ambassador, seen here at the Celebration of Hope event on May 4, 2012. Photo Credit: Kit Kittle.

    WESTPORT, Conn. (May 4, 2012) — Academy Award-winning actress Jennifer Connelly is joining Save the Children as an Artist Ambassador to advocate for children in need in the United States and around the world, the global humanitarian agency announced tonight at its fourth biennial Celebration of Hope charity event in Greenwich, Conn.

    "I'm honored to be an Artist Ambassador for Save the Children, working to ensure all children receive an equal start in life. An investment in our children is an investment in our future," said Jennifer Connelly, actress and mother of three. "As a mom, I welcome this opportunity to help other moms around the world achieve the dreams they have for their children."

    The dynamic duo of the Fourth Hour of TODAY, Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb, co-hosted the evening benefit, which was sponsored by Save the Children's Greenwich and Westchester Leadership Councils. This year's event will benefit Save the Children's early childhood education programs in the United States and globally.

    During the event, Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles presented the Humanitarian Award to Andrea Collins, Save the Children Trustee, and the Corporate Leadership Award to Richard Robinson, Scholastic Chairman of the Board, President and CEO.

    More than 350 guests turned out for the evening affair at the Hyatt Regency in Old Greenwich, Conn. to show their support for early education. The evening included a cocktail reception and dinner, along with entertainment and a private auction. Guests bid on auction treats like dinner for 10 in the wine cellar of chef Mario Batali's Babbo's restaurant, two tickets to the London Olympics with accommodations and round-trip upper-class airfare on Virgin Atlantic; a golfer's Pinehurst dream getaway for four and a two-week stay at a summer house with private beach at the Stockholm Archipelago.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (M), 202.294.9700 (O)

    Washington, D.C. (May 03, 2012) — Michael Klosson, Save the Children's Vice President of Policy and Humanitarian Response, today called on G8 leaders to make a bold commitment to fight the hidden crisis of chronic child malnutrition.

    "G8 leaders must understand one thing: Fighting chronic child malnutrition makes economic sense," said Klosson. "G8 leaders can't claim true progress if economies are growing but children are not.

    "We know that children who receive the right nutrition in the first 1,000 days from a mother's pregnancy to a child's second birthday are more likely to reach their full potential -- performing better in school and even having higher lifelong earnings.

    "Globally, the direct cost of malnutrition is estimated at $20 to $30 billion per year. An investment in nutrition makes economic sense. Countries that have reduced chronic malnutrition have seen their economies grow, countries like China, Vietnam and Cambodia. All have GDP annual growth of more than 5 percent.

    "It takes political will to reduce chronic malnutrition. Unfortunately, many countries have not made addressing malnutrition a priority. This not only holds back citizens, but also the economic potential of their countries."

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contacts
    Ajla Grozdanic, Save the Children, 202.262.7171
    Melissa Jaffin, Berns Communications Group, 212.994.4660

    OMA Logo

    WASHINGTON D.C. (May 3, 2012) — It's time to celebrate Mom! On May 10, the Father's Day/Mother's Day Council, Inc., in partnership with Save the Children, will honor a group of exceptional mothers at the 34th annual Outstanding Mothers Awards in New York City. The event will benefit Save the Children's U.S. Programs, dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty for children right here in America.

    Each year, a number of honorees are carefully selected to receive the prestigious award based on their success in balancing outstanding careers, motherhood and service. This year, once again, the honorees are well-deserved of the recognition: Jessica Alba, Actress and Co-Founder of The Honest Company; Nina Garcia, Fashion Director of Marie Claire and Project Runway Judge; Karen Hoguet, Chief Financial Officer of Macy's, Inc.; Gayle King, Co-host of "CBS This Morning" and Editor-at-Large, O, The Oprah Magazine; and Lisa Price, founder, Carol's Daughter. Mindy Grossman, CEO of HSN, Inc. and 2010 Outstanding Mother Award honoree returns as Mistress of Ceremonies.

    Jessica Alba

    "No matter where their careers and lives may take them, these accomplished women will always be mothers first," said Mark Shriver, Senior Vice President, Save the Children's U.S. Programs. "I am grateful to the National Father's Day/Mother's Day Council for supporting Save the Children's programs that ensure a brighter future for children living in poverty in the United States."

    "We are thrilled to honor these outstanding and inspiring women as our 2012 award recipients," said Dana Verrill, newly appointed Executive Director of the National Father's Day/Mother's Day Council, Inc. "With a strong dedication to their families, careers and public service, these honorees are representative of what today's mothers should aspire to achieve."

    The 34th annual Outstanding Mother Awards will be held at 12 p.m. on Thursday, May 10, at The Pierre New York Hotel. For ticket information or to learn more about the National Father's Day/Mother's Day Council, Inc., please visit www.momanddadday.com.

    About Save the Children's U.S. Programs

    Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need – access to a quality education, healthy foods and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

    Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 147,000 children and families in the United States last year alone. For more information visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

    Information concerning Save the Children Federation, Inc., including financial, licensing or charitable purposes may be obtained, without cost, by calling 1-800-728-3843, writing to Save the Children Federation, Inc. at 54 Wilton Road, Westport, Connecticut 06880.

    About the National Father's Day/Mother's Day Council

    The Father's Day/Mother's Day Council is a not-for-profit organization that strives to heighten the meaning and observance of the Father's Day and Mother's Day holidays, while raising funds for philanthropic purposes. Each year, the Council presents through The National Father's Day Committee "Father of the Year" Awards and through The National Mother's Day Committee "Outstanding Mother" Awards to honor contemporary lifestyle leaders that demonstrate family values and responsibilities, coupled with successful careers. Established in 1937, the Council has donated nearly $32 million to date to meaningful family- related charities nationwide. For more information, please visit www.momanddadday.com.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Global Preterm Birth Rate at Record High Level and Increasing, But Inexpensive Newborn Care Could Save Over 75% of 1.1 Million Preterm Babies Dying Each Year

    Born Too Soon Report

    Malnutrition is an underlying cause of more than 2.6 million child deaths every year, and contributes to preterm births. Read More

    An estimated three-quarters of preterm babies who die could survive without expensive care if proven and inexpensive treatments and preventions were available for all babies wherever they are born.
    Read the Report

    Media Contacts
    Monika Gutestam 202.640-6713 (O) 202.262.6937 (M)
    Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (May 2, 2012) — Each year, some 15 million babies in the world, more than one in 10 births, are born too early, according to Born Too Soon: The Global Action Report on Preterm Birth, released today by Save the Children, The March of Dimes Foundation, the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health and The World Health Organization. More than one million of those babies die shortly after birth; countless others suffer some type of lifelong physical, neurological, or educational disability, often at great cost to families and society. The report, with contributions from more than 100 experts representing almost 50 agencies, universities, organizations, and parent groups, includes the first-ever country ranking of preterm birth rates.

    "Being born too soon is an unrecognized killer," says Joy Lawn, M.D., PhD, co-editor of the report and Director, Global Evidence and Policy for Save the Children's Saving Newborn Lives program, and coordinator of the team that undertook the estimates. "Preterm births account for almost half of all newborn deaths worldwide and are now the second leading cause of death in children under 5, after pneumonia, and six times more than child deaths due to AIDS."

    New figures in the report show both the magnitude of the problem and the disparities between countries. Of the 11 countries with preterm birth rates over 15 percent, all but 2 are in sub-Saharan Africa. Sixty percent of preterm babies are born in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Yet preterm birth is a truly global problem. The United States and Brazil both rank among the top 10 countries with the greatest number of preterm births. In the United States, for example, about 12 percent, or more than one in nine of all births, are born preterm, double the rate of China and most European countries.

    The countries with the greatest numbers of preterm births are:

    India - 3,519,100; China - 1,172,300; Nigeria - 773,600; Pakistan - 748,100; Indonesia - 675,700; United States - 517,400; Bangladesh - 424,100; Philippines - 348,900; Democratic Republic of the Congo - 341,400; and Brazil - 279,300.

    The 10 countries with the highest rates of preterm births for every 100 births are:

    Malawi-18.1 per 100; Comoros and Congo-16.7; Zimbabwe-16.6; Equatorial Guinea-16.5; Mozambique-16.4; Gabon-16.3; Pakistan-15.8; Indonesia-15.5; and Mauritania-15.4.

    Those contrast with the 11 countries with the lowest rates of preterm births:

    Belarus-4.1; Ecuador-5.1; Latvia-5.3; Finland, Croatia, and Samoa-5.5; Lithuania and Estonia-5.7; Antigua/Barbuda -5.8; Japan and Sweden-5.9.

    "The numbers of preterm births are increasing. Of the 65 countries with reliable trend data for preterm birth rates, all but 3 countries have shown increases in the last 20 years," says Dr. Lawn. "Worldwide, 50 million births still happen at home and many babies die without birth or death certificates. These first ever country estimates give us a clear picture of how many babies are born too soon and how many die."

    In high-income countries, the increases in the number of preterm births are linked to the number of older women having babies, increased use of fertility drugs and the resulting multiple pregnancies, and lifestyle challenges such as obesity, smoking and diabetes. Medically unnecessary inductions and Cesarean deliveries before full-term have also increased preterm births. In many low-income countries, the main causes of preterm births include infections, malaria, HIV, and high adolescent pregnancy rates. In rich and poor countries, many preterm births remain unexplained.

    Wide differences within countries were found. For example, in the United States the preterm birth rate in 2009 for black Americans was as high as 17.5 percent, compared with 10.9 percent for white Americans. The age of the mother made a significant difference. In the U.S., the preterm birth rate for women aged 20 to 35 was between 11-12 percent; it was more than 15 percent for women under 17 and over 40.

    But the most startling gap highlighted in the report is the survival gap for preterm babies depending on where they are born. In low-income countries, more than 90 percent of extremely preterm babies (younger than 28 weeks or more than 3 months early) die within the first few days of life, while less than 10 percent die in high-income countries.

    "This 90: 10 survival gap means these babies are not just born too soon — they are born to die, with even their families not knowing there are highly effective solutions that could save their lives", emphasizes Dr. Lawn, "A number of countries, for example, Ecuador, Turkey, Oman and Sri Lanka have halved their neonatal deaths from preterm birth through improving care of serious complications like infections and respiratory distress."

    Evidence-based solutions include:

    • Antenatal steroid injections for mothers in premature labor, which cost $1 per injection. This helps develop immature fetal lungs and prevent respiratory problems; yet, in low-income countries, they are currently only given to 10 percent of those in need. This alone could save almost 400,000 lives of babies a year.
    • "Kangaroo Mother Care" where the newborn is held skin-to-skin on the mother's chest to keep warm, making frequent breastfeeding easy, preventing infections and provides constant maternal supervision. This could save 450,000 lives a year.
    • Antiseptic cream, chlorhexidine, to prevent birth cord infection and antibiotics to fight infection.

    An estimated three-quarters of those preterm babies who die could survive without expensive care if proven and inexpensive treatments and preventions were available for all babies wherever they are born. Skilled frontline workers, especially midwives and nurses with the right skills are the most critical needed.

    Born Too Soon culminates with a new, globally agreed goal to half the number of babies dying from preterm birth by 2025. This can be achieved but requires preterm birth to receive attention around the world, policymakers to invest and implement and the voice of affected parents to be heard.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Save the Children's Saving Newborn Lives program, supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, works in partnership with countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America to reduce newborn mortality and improve newborn health. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Eileen Burke 203.216.0718(M)

    Bulgari teams up with 'Evita' on Broadway for a special benefit for Save the Children's HEART program.
    Bulgari teams up with 'Evita' on Broadway for a special benefit for Save the Children's HEART program. Photo Credit: Richard Termine.

    WESTPORT, Conn. (April 27, 2012) – Bulgari announced that they will celebrate the much anticipated return of "Evita" to Broadway with an exclusive private event and performance benefitting Save the Children's HEART program, dedicated to Healing and Education through the Arts.

    Starting April 25, tickets will be available to the public for this exclusive celebration package including a private event on June 25 hosted by Bulgari at their flagship store on Fifth Ave. where guests will enjoy cocktails and hors d'oeuvres while they mingle with "Evita" stars Ricky Martin, Elena Roger and Michael Cerveris. Guests also will have the opportunity to purchase one of 10 specially engraved rings made for this partnership, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to HEART. Afterwards, guests will head to the Marquis Theatre where they will enjoy a special performance of "Evita" from prime orchestra seats and be treated to a post-show talkback with members of the cast.

    To purchase a ticket to this event, click here.

    As an added effort, 5 percent of all "Evita" tickets for any performance can be donated to HEART when purchased here.

    "Evita" on Broadway

    Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber's Tony Award®-winning musical EVITA tells the passionate and unforgettable true story of Eva Perón, who used her smarts and charisma to rise meteorically from the slums of Argentina to the presidential mansion as First Lady. Adored by her people as a champion for the poor, she became one of the most powerful women in the world — while her greed, outsized ambition and fragile health made her one of the most tragic.

    Starring Grammy® Award winner Ricky Martin, Olivier Award winner Elena Roger, and Tony Award winner Michael Cerveris, "Evita" features some of theater's most beautiful songs, including "Don't Cry for Me Argentina," "Another Suitcase in Another Hall" and "High Flying, Adored." This stunning new production, directed by Michael Grandage and choreographed by Rob Ashford, is one of the most sought-after tickets on the Great White Way.

    Bulgari's Long-Standing Partnership with Save the Children

    Bulgari has been supporting Save the Children's global education efforts since 2009, raising funds that have totaled nearly $16 million, partly through the sales of these special-edition rings.

    Save the Children's Healing and Education through the Arts ( HEART) program is a new and innovative global education program. HEART brings the proven power of artistic expression — drawing, painting, music, drama, dance and more — to some of the world's most vulnerable children, helping them heal and learn so they can reach their highest potential. HEART is currently carried out by Save the Children in preschools, primary schools, and after-school programs in Haiti, Malawi, Mozambique and Nepal. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/HEART.

    Givenik

    Givenik.com is redefining theatergoing, one ticket at a time. The revolutionary service offers discount, full-price & premium tickets to dozens of Broadway and Off-Broadway shows, as well as group rates to all shows, and donates 5% of the ticket price to the charity of the ticket-buyer's choice. Give money, save money, see a show — it's a win-win-win situation. You can see great theater and support HEART year-round at every performance by visiting www.givenik.com/STCHeart.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O) 202.294.9700 (M)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (April 23, 2012) – A huge gap in funding for aid projects aimed at preventing the deepening food crisis in the Sahel is threatening to leave millions of people hungry in the coming months, a coalition of aid agencies has warned today.

    Action Against Hunger, Oxfam, Save the Children and World Vision are aiming to provide emergency assistance to nearly 6 million people across the region but say they have so far been able to secure funding for less than a third of this essential work. Nearly $250 million is needed by all four agencies, but only $52 million has been raised so far.

    Action Against Hunger plans to reach 1 million but so far has only managed to raise a third of what it needs. Equally, Oxfam has only raised a third of what it needs to reach 1.2 million people. Save the Children, which has plans to help 2.5 million people, has only managed to raise 15 percent of its budget and World Vision plans to help 1.1 million people are only 20 percent funded.

    Collectively, this shortfall is equivalent to over 2 million people being deprived of life-saving assistance and, if it remains, is likely to result in significant cutbacks in the agencies' aid programs.

    The United Nations has also been hit by the funding crisis where less than half of the projected $724 million required to tackle the crisis has been raised. This funding gap is likely to grow further as the situation deteriorates and more money is required.

    The aid agencies are seeing increasing malnutrition levels across the Sahel and are calling for a donor pledging conference to rally wealthy governments and donors to generously fund the total aid effort for the food crisis.

    Patricia Hoorelbeke, Action Against Hunger's Regional Representative for West Africa, says: "In the Chadian Sahel, the global acute malnutrition rate already exceeds the emergency threshold of 15 percent and admissions to our feeding centers have increased dramatically. More than 2,000 severely malnourished children were admitted for therapeutic nutritional care in Kanem last month alone. We have deployed additional emergency staff and scaled up our programs but further action is needed to prevent the situation from deteriorating."

    In Mauritania, Oxfam is aiming to reach at least 70,000 people with desperately needed food and clean water. However, with a funding gap of over $1.3 million for its work in Mauritania the agency will only be able to reach half of these people.

    Steve Cockburn, Oxfam's Regional Policy Manager in West Africa said "There is no doubt that families across West Africa are entering a dangerous period, and we have already seen women forced to search for grains in anthills in order to survive. We are ready to bring assistance to millions of people, but time is running out to get programs in place before the crisis hits its peak and funding is urgently needed. We urge the UN to organize a pledging conference as soon as possible to ensure that 15 million people who risk going hungry are not left without the assistance they so desperately need."

    In Niger, Save the Children has only been able to deliver vital cash support to 1 in 10 of the families they plan to reach. "We are already seeing the number of malnourished children needing treatment rise, and unless we can scale up our programs, it will continue to do so," said Jeremy Stoner, Save the Children's West Africa Director. "If we act early we can save thousands of lives. We have known that a hunger crisis is brewing in the Sahel for months, but without funding, there is little we can do to stop it. Addressing malnutrition – including in its most acute form here in West and Central Africa — should be high on the agenda of G8 leaders when they meet in the U.S next month."

    Chris Palusky, Response Manager for World Vision, said: "We're at a key moment in the fight to protect lives of children suffering crippling hunger and malnutrition. We're already seeing people taking extreme measures to cope with the crisis. Some families are resorting to eating wild leaves, others are barely able to feed children one meal a day. We have to act now before the crisis reaches its peak when the most vulnerable will be among those dying from preventable hunger and malnutrition."

    In Niger the lack of funding has prevented World Vision from reaching over 15,000 malnourished children with a life-saving nutrition project and 22,000 people in need of clean water. "This is a desperate situation," added Palusky. "We've seen how our relief and rehabilitation projects can help save lives and protect communities against future crises when funding is available."

    For further information, and to arrange interviews, please contact the aid agencies below:

    Save the Children: In Washington D.C.: Lane Hartill +1 202 294 9700 or +1 202 640 6608

    Oxfam: In UK, Ian Bray on +44 (0)1865 472289 or +44 (0)7721 461339. In Dakar, Charles Bambara on +221 33 859 3722.

    World Vision: In London, Georgina Newman on +44 (0)7557 567753. In Niger, Chris Webster on +44 (0)7827 988665 or skype:chriswebsteruk

    Action Against Hunger: In London, Christine Kahmann on +44 (0)7738260500

    NOTES TO EDITORS:

    Funding needs:

    Agency # of people planning to help Amount needed US$ Amount received Shortfall
    ACF 1 million $45.5m $15.4m $30.1m
    Oxfam 1.2 million $53m $12m $41m
    Save the Children 2.5 million $81.27m $12.27m $69m
    World Vision 1.1 million $60m $12m $48m
    Total:  $239.77m $51.4m $188.1m
    • In 2011 the U.K. Humanitarian Emergency Response Review found that nutrition is one of the most cost effective emergency interventions: feeding programmes cost just over $158 per child saved, whereas a surgical team costs over $3,900 per life saved. $42 per family can prevent child under nutrition.
    • Malnutrition is responsible for at least 35 percent of all child deaths per year in the region. Children who suffer from moderate acute malnutrition are 2.5 times more likely to die than a well nourished child if they don’t receive treatment, and this increases to about 9 times if the malnutrition is severe.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)
    Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)

    Aya sits at her desk in her classroom in a village in Abnoub, Egypt. Once an introverted child, Aya has blossomed into an engaging happy child, with the help of an early childhood development program introduced by Save the Children. Photo credit: Ahmed El-Mezeny.
    Aya sits at her desk in her classroom in a village in Abnoub, Egypt. Once an introverted child, Aya has blossomed into an engaging happy child, with the help of an early childhood development program introduced by Save the Children. Photo credit: Ahmed El-Mezeny.

    WESTPORT, Conn. (April 23, 2012) — Babies and toddlers will be top of mind around the world this week. As part of the Global Action Week of 2012, Save the Children will participate in a host of activities in Washington, D.C. and across the globe, to bring more attention to and mobilize political and financial resources for early education programs, which are vital to children's growth and development.

    "Not only do early childhood care and development programs guarantee children a strong developmental foundation, they are critical to securing children's basic right to an education that enables them to learn the skills and knowledge they need to thrive in the 21st century," said Desmond Bermingham, director of Save the Children's Education Global Initiative.

    A range of local and national events will take place in partnership with NGOs and governments in Australia, Bangladesh, El Salvador, Cambodia, India, Italy, Japan, Mozambique, Nepal, the Philippines, Rwanda, Singapore, the United States and Zambia.

    In Washington, D.C., Early Childhood Advisor for U.S. Programs, Judith Jerald, will share Save the Children's knowledge and experience of working in early childhood development at a Capitol Hill briefing hosted by the U.S. Chapter of the Global Campaign for Education and its members on April 26. Other global activities include art workshops and drawing competitions; community gatherings with parents and caregivers; panels with Ministries of Education and radio and television campaigns.

    New Video: Meet Preschoolers Jazmine and Diverson

    To showcase the benefits of early learning, Save the Children today launched a new video, featuring two preschoolers enrolled in Save the Children's early learning programs from opposite sides of the globe. The short film follows Jazmine, 4, from Queets, Washington state and Diverson, 5, of Zomba, Malawi as they read, share, play, paint, color, count and otherwise demonstrate the skills that kids need to succeed in school and life.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contacts

    Wendy Christian, wchristian@savechildren.org, 203-465-8010
    Eileen Burke, eburke@savechildren.org, 203-221-4233

    Actress, Singer and New Mom Hilary Duff Joins Campaign to Support JOHNSON’S® Baby’s First Initiative with Save the Children

    Hilary Duff is the latest celebrity to support Save the Children in a new campaign with JOHNSON’S® Baby
    Actress Hilary Duff Joins Campaign to Support JOHNSON’S® Baby’s First Initiative with Save the Children

    WESTPORT, Conn. (April 12, 2012) – Save the Children has joined with JOHNSON’S® Baby to launch a new charitable partnership to ensure every baby has a healthy and happy start in life.  The new initiative, called JOHNSON’S® BABY CARES, will support the healthy development of moms and babies while also addressing the basic care needs of families during crisis situations in the form of educational initiatives, product donations and financial assistance.

    The JOHNSON’S® BABY CARES campaign kicks off by leveraging the support of actress and new mom Hilary Duff to assemble “Care Kits” that will be distributed to families in times of natural disasters. Consumers are encouraged to support the charitable platform by visiting the JOHNSON’S® BABY CARES tab on the JOHNSON’S® Baby Facebook page. 

    “According to Save the Children, "90 percent of U.S. children live in areas at risk of natural disasters,” said Ivy Brown, Marketing Director, Baby Care, JOHNSON’S® Baby and DESITIN®. “In addition, families worldwide are also impacted by various global natural disasters where mothers and babies are deprived of their most basic needs. We are launching this charitable platform to provide these mothers and caregivers with essential basic resources and simple tools that will lend support in times of unexpected crisis.”   

    To assist families, the makers of JOHNSON’S® Baby products, alongside parent company Johnson & Johnson, are making a multi-year, multi-million dollar contribution to Save the Children that will help create and sustain key initiatives, including:

    • A donation and distribution of thousands of JOHNSON’S® Baby “Care Kits”, providing families with baby care essentials immediately after a disaster. This commitment is an extension of our existing product donation efforts aimed to meet baby care needs in the U.S. and around the world.

    • Funding that enables Save the Children programming, such as Child Friendly Spaces, which supplies moms and children with safe areas to recover, play and experience the joy of being together as a family following a disaster.

    • Vital training for health workers in developing countries through the “Helping Babies Breathe” program, which teaches basic techniques to prevent birth asphyxia, saving newborn lives.

    “As a new mom, I am inspired by this worthy cause, which aims to give all moms a chance to not only experience the joy of a healthy baby, but also an opportunity to be together and have moments of normalcy during crisis situations,” said Hilary Duff. “I appreciate the opportunity to join JOHNSON’S® Baby and Save the Children to offer a helping hand and make a difference.”

    Consumers can show their support of this campaign in several ways: by purchasing any JOHNSON’S® Baby product between April 15 and June 10, 2012, consumers will have the opportunity to redeem a $0.50 cent coupon at retail stores, in which $0.25 cents will be donated to Save the Children. Throughout the rest of the year JOHNSON’S® Baby will share additional ways consumers can get involved to help support Save the Children.

     “As a brand that has been a trusted partner to families for more than 100 years, JOHNSON’S® Baby cares about providing pure, mild, and gentle products to moms and babies worldwide while remaining committed to the crucial issues surrounding maternal health and the well-being of babies,” said Brown. “Mothers and babies are among the most vulnerable during times of crisis and we are proud to partner with Save the Children to help those in need.”

    “In times of crisis, children are always the most at risk,” said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. “The generous support of JOHNSON’S® Baby, and its parent company Johnson & Johnson, will help us to meet the needs of thousands of mothers and children, here in the United States and around the world.”

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

    About JOHNSON'S® Baby

    JOHNSON'S® Baby, a brand of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Company Division of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, Inc., has a long tradition of providing pure, mild, gentle and clinically-proven products formulated especially for babies. The most trusted name in baby care, the JOHNSON'S® Baby brand is rooted in science and has more than 100 years of leadership in the industry; every product undergoes clinical assessment to ensure it meets our rigorous standards. JOHNSON'S® Baby takes pride in continuing to create and supply parents and healthcare professionals with the best essentials and innovations in baby care.  For more information about the brand and its product offerings, visit www.johnsonsbaby.com.

    About Johnson & Johnson

    Caring for the world, one person at a time…inspires and unites the people of Johnson & Johnson. We embrace research and science - bringing innovative ideas, products and services to advance the health and well-being of people. Our 118,000 employees at more than 250 Johnson & Johnson operating companies work with partners in health care to touch the lives of over a billion people every day, throughout the world.

     



    Media Contact(s)

    Wendy Christian, wchristian@savechildren.org, 203-465-8010
    Eileen Burke, eburke@savechildren.org, 203-221-4233

    Facebook’s Users Given Instant Streaming Access to Kevin Macdonald’s “MARLEY”
    At Midnight on April 20th; Same Day as Theatrical Release

    WESTPORT, Conn. (April 12, 2012) – Shangri-La Entertainment, Tuff Gong Pictures and Milyoni announced today that Academy Award®-winning director Kevin Macdonald’s definitive documentary about the legendary musician Bob Marley will be the first U.S. release ever to be made available for streaming on Facebook®  the same day as its theatrical release, April 20. A portion of the proceeds from the film’s Facebook sales will benefit Save the Children.

    The PG-13 film will be available to stream online using Milyoni’s Social Cinema technology, for a limited time at www.facebook.com/bobmarley starting at 12:01 a.m. on April 20th – the same day it hits theaters and On Demand – for $6.99 via PayPal or by credit card.

    "We are proud to have the ‘MARLEY’ documentary support Save the Children,” said Executive Producer Ziggy Marley. “Helping underprivileged children is something that our father would do every day, so it is very appropriate for ‘MARLEY’ the film to be partnering with a charity whose main focus is helping children. Bob would be very happy."

    “We are delighted that awareness of children’s needs will be raised through this innovative effort,” said Carolyn Miles, president & CEO of Save the Children. “We are proud to use funds generated through this on-demand movie release for the children we serve.”
      
    Made with the unprecedented support of the Marley family, “MARLEY” is the first film to tell the definitive life story of the musician, revolutionary and legend – from his earliest days to his rise to international superstardom. Along with an incredible soundtrack, the film features rare footage, archival photos, incredible performances and interviews with Bob’s family, friends and bandmates.

    Directed by Academy Award®-winner Kevin Macdonald (“One Day in September,” “The Last King of Scotland,” etc.), “MARLEY” is produced by Steve Bing (Shangri-La Entertainment) and Charles Steel, and executive produced by Ziggy Marley and Island Records’ founder Chris Blackwell.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

    About Shangri-La Entertainment

    Shangri-La Entertainment has produced films including “The Polar Express,” “Shine A Light,” “Beowulf,” “Looking For Comedy In The Muslin World,” “For Your Consideration,” “Heart Of Gold” and “CSNY: Déjà Vu,” and has also co-produced the Jerry Lee Lewis CDs “Mean Old Man (2010)” and “Last Man Standing (2006).” In addition to Shangri-La Entertainment, Shangri-La Industries includes sister company Shangri-La Construction, which is a sustainable green construction business focused on LEED-certified commercial properties.

    About Tuff Gong Pictures

    Tuff Gong Pictures first gained fame for producing reggae videos for artists such as Damian Marley, Bounty Killer, Sugar Minott and Everton Blender. In 2001, Tuff Gong Pictures released the Stephanie Black helmed “Life and Debt” – a documentary which addressed the impact of international monetary policies on developing countries such as Jamaica. In 2005, Tuff Gong Pictures released its second thought-provoking documentary (also directed by Stephanie Black) “Africa Unite,” which is described as a concert tribute, Marley Family travelogue and humanitarian documentary all in one.

    About Milyoni

    Based in the San Francisco Bay Area, Milyoni, Inc. is the leader in social entertainment.  The company’s technology provides entertainment companies with a way to connect and engage with Facebook fans, and turn them into customers. Whether it’s watching a live concert, movie or sporting event or shopping your favorite brands, Milyoni enables companies to monetize fans pages through a unique level of engagement and a shared social experience. Milyoni’s services reach over 150 million fans from industry leading customers, including Universal Pictures, Lionsgate, Paramount Studios, Big Air Studios, Austin City Limits Live, Turner Broadcasting, University of Oklahoma and the NBA to bring a variety of digital content and physical goods to fans on Facebook. For more information, visit www.milyoni.com.

     


     



    Media Contacts
    Wendy Christian 203.465.8010 (M)
    Eileen Burke 203.221.4233 (O)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (April 11, 2012) — Save the Children is sending two emergency assessment teams to Aceh province to assess the needs of children and family following the 8.6 earthquake that struck off the coast of Aceh, Indonesia earlier today. Following the quake, a tsunami warning was issued for countries along the rim of the Indian Ocean but has since been lifted for most countries.

    "The extent of the earthquake damage is still unclear, but we know children are often the most vulnerable following a disaster," said Save the Children's Olivier Franchi from the global humanitarian agency's office in Jakarta. "There also have been major aftershocks. We stand ready to respond."

    Franchi reported that all Save the Children staff in Aceh is safe and accounted for.

    Save the Children works in 14 provinces across Indonesia. The agency has been improving the lives of children in need in Aceh since 1976, and has helped communities improve their capacity to cope with and respond to disasters after the 2004 Asian earthquake and tsunami.

    For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/sumatra.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O), 203.465.8010 (M)
    Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

    WESTPORT, Conn. (April 10, 2012) – Escalating violence in Syria, including cross-border fire into a refugee camp in Turkey, raises urgent concerns for the safety of children fleeing the conflict, said Save the Children. The number of refugees arriving in Turkey and Lebanon has risen sharply in the past week, as violence continues and hopes for a ceasefire remain uncertain.

    In the past two days, five people in a Turkish refugee camp have been wounded by gunfire coming from Syria, while a Lebanese cameraman was shot on the border. This raises grave concerns for families and children fleeing the conflict for the safety of neighboring countries.

    “Children are being killed and wounded as violence continues in Syria, with many more witnessing scenes no child should ever see. The children our teams are receiving in Lebanon are deeply scarred by what they have been through,” said Carolyn Miles, president & CEO of Save the Children. “Given increasing uncertainty over how the situation in Syria will develop, it is essential that those children seeking refuge in neighboring countries are safe from the violence. Free and open humanitarian access must be prioritized at all costs.”

    Save the Children has supported over 1,500 Syrian refugee children with education and activities along the Jordan and Lebanon borders, and is helping hundreds more of the most vulnerable children come to terms with what they have witnessed through child-friendly spaces. Specially trained social workers are visiting vulnerable families, and distributing urgently needed food for pregnant women and new mothers, medicines and clothing for children and babies. The organization is also working to raise awareness of the dangers of unexploded ordinance among children.

    About Save the Children

    Save the Children is the leading independent organization creating lasting change in the lives of children in need in the United States and in countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and learn more about us at www.savethechildren.org.



    Media Contact
    Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O), 203.465.8010 (M)

    Save the Children responds to latest global aid figures

    WASHINGTON, DC (April 6, 2012) – New figures released from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) show that major donors’ aid to developing countries has fallen for the first time in 10 years, threatening the progress that has been made over the past several decades in the fight against poverty. The numbers reflect a 2.7% decrease in official development assistance in 2011, while assistance from the U.S. fell by 0.9%.

    This deduction has been made despite clear evidence that aid assistance has had a dramatic impact in the last 20 years, with chronic malnutrition rates decreasing by 13% and a 34% reduction in maternal deaths since 1980. According to the humanitarian aid agency Save the Children, U.S. leadership on the HIV/AIDS pandemic has also resulted in a significant increase in the number of people receiving antiretroviral medication, from 300,000 in 2002 to more than 6.6 million in 2010.

    “As the world’s largest donor, the United States must continue to lead the international community in fighting poverty and supporting children around the world,” said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children President & CEO. “Even in tough economic times, we must invest in the health, education and potential of children everywhere. These children will be our healthcare workers, teachers, and global leaders of tomorrow. We must sustain the progress we have made over the past decades – not undermine it by cutting foreign assistance.”

    As Congress considers spending levels for fiscal year 2013, Save the Children encourages robust funding for poverty- and humanitarian-focused international development accounts. This funding represents less than 1% of the overall federal budget, yet has the power to transform lives and communities. “We can’t balance the budget by denying food and education to the poorest children in the world,” said Miles.

    About Save the Children

    Save the Children is the leading independent organization creating lasting change in the lives of children in need in the United States and in countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and learn more about us at www.savethechildren.org.



    Media Contact
    Hannah Brencher 203.216.7417

    WESTPORT, Conn. (March 23, 2012) — Applauded for their leadership and extraordinary commitment to children around the world, Senator Robert Casey, Congressman Ted Poe, and Congressman Chris Van Hollen were honored this week with Save the Children's 2012 Congressional Champion for Real and Lasting Change Award.

    "We honor Van Hollen, Casey and Poe for their consistent support and leadership in shaping a peaceful and prosperous world where children are better able to reach their full potential. Their unwavering commitment and dynamic leadership initiatives only strengthen our organization's will to bring global stability to children everywhere," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children President and CEO.

    Each year, as part of Save the Children's Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill, the agency recognizes select congressional leaders for their outstanding work in helping children in need both at home and around the globe. Miles presented the three recipients with the award at the opening reception for the 2012 Advocacy Summit on Tuesday.

    "I am honored and humbled to receive this distinction from Save the Children," said Senator Casey. "I commend Save the Children's tireless efforts to build support for the initiatives I have championed in the Senate, from increasing access to early learning programs to ensuring that all children have the healthy food they need to fuel their learning. The future of our nation rests in our ability to give every child the opportunity to succeed, and I will continue to fight on their behalf."

    "It's an honor to receive this award from an outstanding group like Save the Children, whose work helps millions of American children each year. They are on the front lines of working to break the cycle of childhood poverty and improve the lives of future generations," said Congressman Van Hollen. "The Congress must give our children and grandchildren the best chance for success – investing in their future is truly in the best interest of our entire county."

    Miles praised the awardees for being "dynamic partners … with their legislative initiatives and dedication to seeing funding for the international affairs budget realized." In addition, the organization lauded the recipients for their outstanding efforts to safeguard and promote effective and efficient programming for the most vulnerable children and families around the world.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Phil Campbell High School Band Debuts New Instruments and Uniforms Purchased through Donations from Save the Children and Warner Music

    Media Contacts
    Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171
    Jessica Burton 205.292.2740

    At its first public appearance since the deadly tornadoes in April 2011, the students of the Phil Campbell High School band in Alabama will debut new instruments purchased with a generous Warner Music donation arranged through Save the Children.
    At its first public appearance since the deadly tornadoes in April 2011, the students of the Phil Campbell High School band in Alabama will debut new instruments purchased with a generous Warner Music donation arranged through Save the Children.

    WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 15, 2012) — Deadly tornadoes last April may have turned its trophy-filled band room into wreckage and destroyed most of the instruments, but for the Phil Campbell High School band, the music never stopped. On the eve of the one-year anniversary of the devastating storms, the band will host a concert on March 17 at 5 PM at the Regency Square Mall in Florence, Ala., to express its gratitude for the outpouring of support it received throughout the year.

    Coinciding with national Music in Our Schools Month, the Giving Thanks concert pays homage to the power of music to lift the students' spirits in the face of tragedy and loss, the resilience of the Phil Campbell community, and the kindness of individuals and organizations whose contributions made it all possible.

    At this first public appearance since the storms, the students will debut new instruments purchased with a generous Warner Music donation arranged through Save the Children. In addition, Save the Children awarded $12,000 of relief funds to Phil Campbell High School and Elementary School, including $2,000 for the replacement of the band's destroyed uniforms and shoes.

    "My students and I can't thank Warner Music and Save the Children enough," said the band's director, Bobby Patrick. "The grants allowed us to have a concert season and helped restore some of the normalcy for these students."

    Save the Children's Post-Tornado Relief Efforts in Alabama

    Since the initial days after the deadly tornadoes of last spring, Save the Children's U.S. Programs has dedicated more than $780,000 to disaster response and recovery efforts in the state, working closely with communities across northern Alabama to meet children's needs and help families cope with the stress, loss, fear and grief that follow in the wake of such disasters.

    "Thousands of kids affected by the Southeast tornadoes witnessed the funerals of neighbors, teachers and, in some cases, parents and other loved ones," said Mark Shriver, Senior Vice President for Save the Children's U.S. Programs. "As much as we need states and first responders to better protect children and families before and during disasters, emotional and psychological support is just as important in the aftermath."

    In its continued effort toward recovery, Save the Children has granted $174,000 to the Tuscaloosa City School District and $39,000 to the University of Alabama Child Development Resource Center to provide the signature "Journey of Hope" emotional recovery program to 4,000 children and adult caregivers throughout the region.

    Working with children in Alabama since 2005, Save the Children has partnered with schools in Clarke, Escambia, Wilcox and Washington counties to provide early childhood development programs for children from birth to age five, and literacy, nutrition and physical activity programs for children from kindergarten through sixth grade.

    About Save the Children

    Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to a quality education, healthy foods and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters like hurricanes and wildfires strike, Save the Children is among the first on the ground ensuring the needs of children are being met.

    Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 147,000 children and families in the United States last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    U.S. IKEA Customers, Co-Workers Raise over $1 Million through Holiday Promotion

    Media Contact
    Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

    WESTPORT, Conn. (March 13, 2012) – Shoppers around the globe proved that their purchasing power can do more than spur on the economy, it also can help educate kids. Save the Children and UNICEF will receive $16.2 million from the IKEA Foundation for funds raised by IKEA customers and co-workers through its 2011 Soft Toy for Education campaign.

    The donation will help Save the Children and UNICEF carry out 18 education projects in 16 countries. Save the Children's share will support education for children in some of the most marginalized groups (minorities and children with disabilities) in Asia (Bangladesh, China, Cambodia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines) and Eastern Europe (Lithuania and Romania). UNICEF's equal share will go to its Schools for Africa projects in seven countries and two projects in Russia and China.

    In the United States, IKEA raised over $1 million through sales of soft toys. The IKEA Foundation donates $1.30 for each of the 12.4 million soft toys, children's books and children's meals sold in over 300 IKEA stores worldwide from November 1 to December 31 (in China, through January 2012). Since 2003, the annual Soft Toy campaign has generated $61.75 million in donations, helping 8 million children in close to 40 countries have a quality education.

    The donations will help UNICEF and Save the Children train teachers in child-friendly teaching methods, supply school materials like pencils, books, bags, rebuild schools and provide better water and toilet facilities, and increase school attendance rates.

    "The innovative IKEA Soft Toy campaign continues to show astounding results year by year, making it one of the most strategic global cause-marketing campaigns for children in the world today. The beauty of the campaign is that it not only benefits children all over the world by giving them the opportunity to learn and go to school, it also raises awareness among children and grown-ups about some of the challenging situations children face today," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "I would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to IKEA customers and co-workers at IKEA stores around the world, who have contributed to the phenomenal success of the 2011 Soft Toy campaign."

    "Our appreciation and gratitude go to IKEA co-workers and customers worldwide for making the 2011 Soft Toys for Education campaign such a success. Thanks to you, 5.5 million children in Africa will receive a better education. For more than ten years the IKEA Foundation has promoted children's rights by supporting UNICEF's work and the results achieved for children make us very proud of this partnership," said Leila Pakkala, UNICEF Director of Private Fundraising and Partnerships.

    The IKEA soft-toy character "Mr. Broccoli" chronicled his visits to IKEA-funded education programs in Bangladesh, China and Vietnam this past fall. You can read more at @Broctweets on Twitter and www.Facebook.com/MisterBroccoli.

    IKEA strives to be 'The Life Improvement Store,' and since its 1943 founding in Sweden, has offered home furnishings of good design and function, at low prices so the majority of people can afford them. There are currently more than 320 IKEA stores in 38 countries, including 38 in the U.S. IKEA, the world's leading home furnishings company, incorporates sustainable efforts into day-to-day business and supports initiatives that benefit children and the environment.

    The IKEA Foundation aims to improve the opportunities for children and youth by funding holistic, long-term programs that can create substantial, lasting change, and enable them to take charge of their own future. The IKEA Foundation works with strong strategic partners applying innovative approaches to achieve large-scale results in four fundamental areas of a child's life: home, health, education and family income. Currently funded programs benefit an estimated 100 million children.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
    Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O), 202.294.9700 (M)

    New Program Approach Boosts Health and Well-Being of Young, Vulnerable Children

    WESTPORT, Conn.  (March 12, 2012) A new approach to address the needs of children and their caregivers affected by HIV/AIDS, including in-home coaching sessions, is boosting the health and well-being of young African children, according to a global coalition led by Save the Children, CARE and the Consultative Group on Early Childhood Care and Development. 

    A six-month review looked at how caregiver engagement changed following in-home coaching sessions in programs run by Save the Children, CARE and the Firelight Foundation in Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia, countries hit hard by the AIDS crisis. Early findings showed an increase in children’s growth monitoring, an increase in the percentage of children who received age-appropriate immunizations, an increase in opportunities for children to play, and a decrease in illness among caretakers. 

    Reaching Caregivers and Young Children at Home

    Funded by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, the new approach, called “The Essential Package,” was designed to reach AIDS-affected families at home, where the needs of the youngest children– most not yet in school – often fall between the cracks. 

    “These young children spend their days at home, invisible to society.  They are more likely to be malnourished, neglected, and miss key developmental milestones and this must change,” said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children, speaking from a visit to Mozambique. “The Essential Package provides a lifeline for both children and their caregivers here in Mozambique and throughout Africa.”

    Through home visits, volunteers used tools to identify the health and nutritional status of caregivers and their children; provided simple messages through illustrated flashcards that reinforce positive parenting practices tailored to a child’s age and stage of development; and connected caregivers to existing resources in their community, such as the local health clinic. 

    Changing Simple Behaviors Improves Children’s Well-Being

    Many caregivers said they made changes in their daily activities following home visits, such as providing more nutritious foods like ground nuts to their child’s diet; seeking medical attention earlier when they fall ill; and treating water with chlorine to make it safe to drink.

    “Young children in the developing world infected with or affected by AIDS are at a distinct disadvantage in virtually all aspects of life,” said Dr. Helene Gayle, president and CEO of CARE USA.  “The Essential Package is a cutting-edge approach designed to educate these children at a young age and empower them to live healthy, safe lives through adulthood.” 

    The Essential Package has been developed by a team of non-profits and UN and government agencies*, and is being recognized as a model for governments, communities and non-profits to address all the developmental needs of young, vulnerable children.  

    Ed Cain, vice president, Grant Programs at the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, said the initiative is “in keeping with the wishes of our founder, Conrad Hilton, to protect vulnerable children. We're pleased to be involved with the development of this initiative and to see that the overlooked issues of young children affected by HIV/AIDS are being addressed.” 

    Cain added, “The Essential Package will provide this highly vulnerable population with the foundation to grow and thrive, and break out of the cycle of poverty."

    To learn more about the Essential Package, go here:  www.OVCsupport.net and http://ecdgroup.com/HIV_AIDS.asp.

    ###

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Learn more at www.savethechildren.org or follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

    CARE -Founded in 1945 with the creation of the CARE Package, CARE is a leading humanitarian organization fighting global poverty. CARE has more than six decades of experience delivering emergency aid during times of crisis. Our emergency responses focus on the needs of the most vulnerable populations, particularly girls and women. Last year CARE worked in 87 countries and reached 82 million people around the world. To learn more, visit www.care.org. 

    The Conrad N. Hilton Foundation was created in 1944 by international business pioneer Conrad N. Hilton, who founded Hilton Hotels and left his fortune to help the world’s disadvantaged and vulnerable people. The Foundation currently conducts strategic initiatives in five priority areas: providing safe water, ending chronic homelessness, preventing substance abuse, caring for vulnerable children, and extending Conrad Hilton’s support for the work of Catholic Sisters. From its inception, the Foundation has awarded more than $1 billion in grants, distributing $82 million in the U.S. and around the world in 2011. For more information, please visit www.hiltonfoundation.org.

    *Members of the global coalition include:  Action for Children, ADEA, Aga Khan Foundation, AIR, AMANI, Bernard Van Leer, Brookings Institute, CARE, California Polytechnical State University, Catholic Relief Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Child Fund, CIFF, Consultative Group for Early Childhood Development, Covance, Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, ELMA, Episcopal Relief and Development, FHI 360, Firelight Foundation, FXB, GBC Health, Georgia State University, Global Partnership for Education, Handicap International, Harvard Center for the Developing Child, Harvard University, Health and Human Services, Hesperian Foundation, ICF & Associates,  John Snow International,  Long Island University, Management Sciences for Health, Merck, Oak Foundation, Office of the Global AIDS Council, Pact, PATH, Peace Corps, Plan USA, Population Council, Public Law 10995 (US Government Secretariat for Orphans and Vulnerable Children), REPSSI,Royal Free University College of London, Salvation Army, Save the Children, Spark Center, UNC Frank Porter Graham Center, UNICEF, UNESCO, University Research Company, USAID, Winrock, World Bank and World Vision International.



    Let the Lifelong Love of Reading Begin this National Read Across America Day on March 2

    Media Contact
    Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 2, 2012) — If the latest statistics are any indication, turning our children into avid readers is easier said than done. According to the results from the 2011 National Assessment of Education Progress, only about one third of American fourth-graders are proficient in reading.

    "Teaching our children to become skilled readers early on is key to ensuring their success in school and life," said Judith Jerald, Early Childhood Advisor, Save the Children's U.S. Programs. "This is especially true for the nearly one in four children living in poverty in America, because education is one of the most viable pathways out of poverty."

    And yet, more than 60 percent of low-income families can't afford to have books in their homes. That's why Save the Children, through our early childhood education and school-based programs, strives to help disadvantaged children right here in the United States develop and grow as readers from birth all the way through sixth grade. The results speak for themselves! Last year, the number of our program participants reading at or above grade level nearly doubled by the end of the school year. This National Read Across America Day, let's make reading a priority for our children. Whether your little one is a beginning reader or a reluctant one, these lists of expert-recommended fun and educational reads will help your child uncover the bookworm within.

    Get your toddlers off to an early reading start with these picks:

    • Mine! A Backpack Baby Story by Miriam Cohen
    • Joseph Had a Little Overcoat by Simms Taback
    • I Went Walking by Sue Williams

    Click here for more reading suggestions

    Ensure your preschoolers get their daily dose of reading with these book selections:

    • Best Friends by Charlotte Labaronne
    • How Do Dinosaurs Play with Their Friends by Jane Yolen and Mark Teague
    • Mine! Mine! Mine! By Shelly Becker

    Click here for more reading suggestions 

    Keep your grade-schooler's reading skills on track with these fun reads:

    • Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
    • Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
    • Sarah, Plain and Tall by Patricia MacLachlan

    Click here for more reading suggestions 

    Kids Say the Darndest Things…about Reading

    We asked children in our literacy programs why they love a good book:

    "You can learn many things in a book. You can even learn how to build a hamster home!" –Kori, 7, Point Pleasant, WV

    "I love to read because the pictures and stories help me to imagine that I am somewhere else!" –Nevaeh, 7, Landers, CA

    "I like to read because there are new adventures all the time. Fiction is my favorite, because you can get inside the adventure." –Brandon, 11, Lobelville, TN

    "I love reading because it feeds my sweet tooth and I love sweet things." –TaTyana, 11, Clarksdale, MS

    "I love reading because it takes my mind to a different world." –Macie, 10, Williston, SC

    "Because my mama likes to read!" –Kayla, 8, Shaw, MS

    About Save the Children

    Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to a quality education, healthy foods and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters like hurricanes and wildfires strike, Save the Children is among the first on the ground ensuring the needs of children are being met.

    Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 147,000 children and families in the United States last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (M), 202.294.9700 (O)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (March 12, 2012) — Save the Children today called on the American public to raise its voice against the killing in Syria and make sure children there have full access to humanitarian aid.

    “Children are being killed and wounded inside Syria,” said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. “This must stop and children must be protected. Many children have also witnessed killing and fighting, atrocities that no child should ever see. Seeing this carnage could have a life-long impact on children. Neutral, independent aid organizations like Save the Children must be allowed to enter Syria to help children.”

    Zahra, a mother of two young boys, arrived 6 months ago in northern Lebanon from Baba Amr, a neighborhood in the city of Homs. “When demonstrations started in Baba Amr, we did not leave,” said Zahra. “The next day, I saw tanks in the streets and check points. I also heard gunshots and knew that people were injured and others were killed. My house was on the third floor. Every time there was shooting, I would grab my two children and go down to the basement.”

    A few days later, Zahra fled Syria with a group of 200 women and children. They walked for hours before crossing the Kebir River and hiking through the mountains with their children on their backs before arriving in Lebanon.

    Refugees in Lebanon say that they can’t reach family members in Baba Amr because communications have been cut off. As temperatures drop and supplies become scare in cities affected by the conflict, Save the Children is worried about children cut off from aid.

    While the International Committee of the Red Cross has been allowed access to certain areas — but at the time of this writing unable to access Baba Amr — it is vital that all humanitarian agencies are given unfettered access to help children in need.

    Go to www.savethechildren.org/syria to find out more about Save the Children’s work on the Syrian border in Lebanon and Jordan where we have opened safe places for children to play. We are also working with schools and teachers to help children who have been through harrowing experiences. You can also add your voice by tweeting #stopkilling.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Chronic Malnutrition is Preventable, but Remains Deadlier and More Widespread than Food Scarcity, New Report Says

    Media Contact
    Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

    Celebrity chef Cat Cora visits Save the Children's nutrition programs in Ethiopia. Credit: Anne-Sofie Helms/Save the Children
    Celebrity chef Cat Cora visits Save the Children's nutrition programs in Ethiopia. Credit: Anne-Sofie Helms/Save the Children

    WESTPORT, Conn. (February 15, 2011) — Despite global efforts to address food security, chronic childhood malnutrition has been largely overlooked, putting almost half a billion children at risk of permanent damage in the next 15 years, Save the Children said in a new report released today.

    "Malnutrition is a largely hidden crisis, but it afflicts one in four children around the world," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "It wreaks lifelong damage and is a major killer of children. Every hour of every day, 300 children die because of malnutrition."

    Save the Children's new report, titled "A Life Free from Hunger: Tackling Child Malnutrition," was released as the world begins to awaken to the latest emergency food crisis, in the African Sahel. But the report reveals that chronic malnutrition, or a lack of proper nutrition over time, is deadlier and far more widespread than the short-term acute malnutrition frequently seen during food crises.

    Chronic malnutrition weakens young children's immune systems, leaving them more likely to die of childhood diseases like diarrhea, pneumonia and malaria. It leads to 2 million child deaths a year, three times as many as result from acute malnutrition.

    But, chronic malnutrition also leaves children far more vulnerable to extreme suffering and death from acute malnutrition when emergency food crises hit, as in the Horn of Africa and the Sahel right now. In total, malnutrition underlies 2.6 million child deaths every year, or one third of all child deaths.

    "It's time for a paradigm shift. The world can no longer afford to wait until visibly emaciated children grab headlines to inspire the action these children need and deserve. Unfortunately for millions of the world's chronically malnourished children, permanent damage to their physical and intellectual development is not as obvious, and so it's too often overlooked," said Miles.

    Save the Children's new report calls for action on proven solutions that would prevent these deaths and help all children affected by hunger and malnutrition. Progress on reducing malnutrition has been extremely slow for 20 years, in comparison to great strides made on other global health crises.

    Costs are High

    Well-nourished children perform better in school and grow up to earn considerably more on average than those who were malnourished as children. Recent evidence suggests nutritional interventions can increase adult earnings by 46 percent. Malnutrition costs many developing nations an estimated 2-3 percent of their GDP, extends the cycle of poverty, and impedes global economic growth at a critical time.

    "World leaders are searching for ways to strengthen their economies over the long term, so why not achieve that through helping children get the healthy start they deserve?" Miles said.

    As Save the Children released its new report, United Nations leaders endorsed its call to action to end chronic malnutrition, also known as stunting.

    UNICEF's Executive Director Anthony Lake said: "Stunting is rarely obvious until it is too late. The first 1,000 days of life determines a child's life forever — before birth until the 2nd birthday. After that it is simply too late to repair the damage to the bodies and brains of a child. We are encouraged though there is now an awakening around stunting thanks to the leadership of many governments and the Scaling Up Nutrition movement."

    Action Lagging Awareness

    While addressing food security, world leaders have galvanized much-needed support to boost agricultural productivity, but they have yet to make nutrition central to their efforts. In 2009, President Obama helped spearhead the L'Aquila Food Security Initiative, which inspired $22 billion in pledges at the G8 and G20 meetings. Yet, only 3 percent of these pledges and less than 1 percent of pledges fulfilled to date have targeted nutrition.

    "Investment in agriculture is clearly important to making sure production keeps up with a growing population," said Miles. "But let's not forget, right now the world produces enough food to feed everybody, and yet one third of children in developing countries are malnourished. Clearly, just growing more food is not the answer."

    "The United States has shown great leadership on nutrition, but now must call on other powerful nations to make it a global priority," she added.

    Many expect President Obama will again address food security when he hosts this spring's G8 meeting in Chicago. Save the Children is calling on the G8 to extend food security funding at current levels for three years while including greater focus on nutrition.

    A Solvable Crisis

    According to seminal research published in the Lancet medical journal in 2008, a set of 13 basic interventions could prevent the vast majority of malnutrition, especially in the critical 1,000-day window between conception and age 2. These include encouraging breastfeeding to avoid contaminated water, proper introduction of varied foods for infants, fortification of basic staples and vitamin supplementation.

    The World Bank has estimated the cost of getting these solutions to 90 percent of the children who need them would annually save 2 million lives and cost $10 billion. Split among developing and developed countries, that sum is manageable, Save the Children says.

    If the world fails to act and the current rate of progress of reducing chronic malnutrition continues at less than 1 percent a year, 450 million children will be affected in the next 15 years, Save the Children says.

    Download the Report and Learn More

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact:
    Eileen Burke, Save the Children, eburke@savechildren.org, 203-216-0718
    Phil Hay, The World Bank, phay@worldbank.org, 202-473-1796

    Save the Children's preschool program in Mozambique gives kids a leg up on learning, according to a new World Bank study.
    Photo Credit: Per-Anders Pettersson

    WESTPORT, Conn. (February 14, 2012) Children in rural Mozambique, who attended preschool programs run by the international humanitarian group, Save the Children, were 24 percent more likely to enroll in primary school and were significantly better equipped to learn than children not covered by the program.

    The World Bank Study is the first such evaluation of early childhood development programs in Africa, where entrenched poverty means that 61 percent of children under the age of five years do not grow and learn to their full potential. Across the region, children's poor health and nutrition, along with too little mental stimulation in their early years of life, frequently mean they are sick more, learn less, and start school later than children who join early education programs like Save the Children's in Mozambique.

    "This evaluation provides us evidence of the convincing results in pre-school program thus revealing the great potential for improving the health and learning outcomes of children in Africa. I therefore urge leaders, policy makers, communities, and parents to take advantage of such programs that help young children because they also help break the vicious cycle of dynastic poverty in families." said Obiageli Ezekwesili, World Bank Vice President for Africa, and a former Nigerian Education Minister.

    Conducted by World Bank researchers Sophie Naudeau and Sebastian Martinez, the randomized study shows that children going to preschool are much more likely to show interest in mathematics and writing, recognize shapes, and show respect for other children, than those who are not. Preschool benefits can also benefit the wider family: parents of enrolled children are 26 percent likelier to work, while some older siblings are able to go to school themselves.

    "Having participated in a seminar in Maputo at which the results of this study were presented, I am amazed by the effect that simple, modest Early Children Development programs can have on children's performance in primary schools," said H.E. Zeferino Martins, Minister of Education, Mozambique, "The study, rare in Africa, has thrown light on the possibilities that we in developing countries can explore to give our children a much better future."

    Save the Children's program in Mozambique, launched in 2008 through a $1 million donation from the 2007 Idol Gives Back television special,has helped build escolinhas or preschool centers targeting orphans and vulnerable children. It has reached about 5,000 three to six year olds and their families, and is run with the help of trained volunteers from rural communities.

    The study, funded by the World Bank and the International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie), covered 2,000 households in 76 rural communities of the Gaza province, which is close to Mozambique's capital Maputo, and has relatively higher human development indicators compared to the rest of the country. This implies an even more urgent need for preschool programs in other parts of the country.

    "Small investments can be very powerful. For as little as about $2.50 a month per child, children and families in Mozambique reap the rewards of early education both now and in the future," said Carolyn Miles, president & CEO, Save the Children, "We are delighted that our early learning program in Mozambique offers a model for low-income countries across Africa."

    For its part, the World Bank has invested $1.1 billion in pre-primary education during FY09-FY11.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Monika Gutestam 202.640.6713

    Washington D.C. (February 10, 2012) — New evidence published today in the Lancet shows that using the widely available antiseptic chlorhexidine to clean the newborn's umbilical cord stump in the first hours of life prevents infections and reduces mortality in newborn babies. The findings from studies done in Bangladesh and Pakistan show that cord care with chlorhexidine is a simple, affordable and effective intervention that can save several hundred thousand newborn lives in low-resource settings every year if implemented globally at large scale.

    Each year 3.1 million newborns die globally, accounting for more than 40 percent of the estimated 7.6 million deaths of children under the age of 5. In poor, high-mortality settings, more than 30 percent of these newborn deaths are the result of serious infection, one of the three leading causes of newborn death worldwide.

    In developed countries where hygienic birth practices with sterile instruments are the standard of care, infection of the umbilical cord stump (omphalitis) is almost nonexistent. However, in many developing countries, especially in Asia, the majority of deliveries takes place at home and are often attended by untrained attendants or family members. The care provided during labor, delivery and the postnatal period is often unhygienic and may include harmful practices such as applying ash, oils or even cow dung to the cord.

    In rural Bangladesh, 29,000 newborns were enrolled in a study to determine the effectiveness of single or 7-day cleansing with chlorhexidine compared to "nothing on the cord" as currently recommended by the World Health Organization. Results show that cleansing the umbilical cord stump with chlorhexidine on the first day of birth reduced the newborn's risk of infection and death by as much as 20 percent. The study was led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and funded by U.S Agency for International Development (USAID) in partnership with Save the Children's Saving Newborn Lives program.

    In Pakistan, researchers from Aga Khan University evaluated the effect of umbilical-cord cleansing with chlorhexidine on cord infection and neonatal mortality, with or without hand washing with antiseptic soap. In a sample of around 10,000 newborns, chlorhexidine cord cleansing reduced the risk of infection by 42 percent and newborn mortality by 38 percent. The study was funded by the Pakistan Initiative for Mothers and Newborns (PAIMAN) and John Snow Inc. through a grant from USAID.

    "Around the world almost one million newborns die every year from largely preventable infections in the first days of life. We now have the evidence we need to introduce chlorhexidine cord cleansing across poor communities in Asia, which could potentially save tens of thousands of newborn lives in the region." said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children.

    "Giving birth and a child's first week is a risky time for a mother and her newborn," said Dr. Rajiv Shah, the Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development. "These studies provide evidence of a simple, low-cost technology that can prevent illness and death for the most vulnerable children. USAID is committed to transforming research into better results and access to lifesaving interventions."

    The application of chlorhexidine requires minimal training and can be easily administered in various settings, including the home. Chlorhexidine can be delivered to women through existing health services as well as through retail outlets and by community health workers who have contact with pregnant women. As noted by Dr Abdullah Baqui, senior author of the Bangladesh study "Chlorhexidine cord cleansing is a simple, safe, effective, and inexpensive intervention. Large scale implementation of this intervention with high coverage has the potential to avert an estimated half a million neonatal deaths per year."

    Save the Children's Saving Newborn Lives program, supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, works in partnership with countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America to reduce newborn mortality and improve newborn health.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contacts
    (Zimbabwe) Sophie Hamandishe +263.714.252517
    (U.S.) Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

    Oprah's All-Time Favorite Guest Tererai Trent Sees Real Progress with School Construction on Zimbabwe Visit

    Clean water flows from a tap after a new water pump was installed at the Matau Primary School in Zimbabwe. Photo credit: Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi
    Clean water flows from a tap after a new water pump was installed at the Matau Primary School in Zimbabwe. Photo credit: Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi

    Zimbabwe, Harare (Feb. 3, 2012) — Go to any U.S. school, and youwill find water fountains in the school hallways. But at the Matau Primary School in Zvipani village in northeast Zimbabwe, the nearest water source for thirsty kids is nearly a mile away from school.

    "The time it takes for a child to walk to and from school to get water is precious time wasted outside of the classroom that they cannot afford," says Oprah's all-time favorite guest, Tererai Trent, standing in the school yard of the Matau Primary School which she attended as a child. "Worse, the village water pump was not built with children in mind and is unsafe. Many kids have fallen into the water hole and injured themselves."

    That is about to change. Save the Children put the finishing touches this week on a new water pump on school grounds. Over the past month, workers drilled nearly 140 feet into the ground to find water. The community chipped in by digging trenches so workers could lay the pipes connecting the water hole to a water storage tank and pump. After putting in the pipes, the workers hooked up the electrically-powered pump. Today, for the first time, clean water is flowing from the tap.

    "The new pump will make it so much easier for children to get clean, safe water for drinking and hand washing. And, that helps kids stay healthy and in class," says Tererai. "The teachers and kids are really excited to try out the new pump. Clean water is something so simple that many of us take for granted every day, more so at a time when Zimbabwe is faced with diseases such as cholera and typhoid."

    The water project is part of the Matau Primary School project funded through the Oprah Winfrey Foundation in honor of Tererai, Oprah's all-time favorite guest. The education project includes infrastructure upgrades at the Matau Primary School, as well as learning programs for nearly 4,000 children in Matau and nearby communities.

    Teacher's Houses, Some Classrooms Nearly Built

    Several Matau Primary School teachers will soon see their crumbling homes replaced with new ones. Construction of two teacher's houses is nearly complete. Window and door frames were recently fitted and workers are installing the roof trusses.

    Two new classrooms also are almost finished being built with roofing to start in the next few weeks. Save the Children, weather permitting, plans to complete the first phase of the construction, including additional classrooms, latrines, a school administration building and a preschool playground by December 2012.

    "I can see real progress since my last visit here in October," says Tererai. "The community has given hours of sweat equity to help, and the buildings are going up. You can see joy and hope radiating from their faces. And, now, the best part will soon begin, when the children start learning."

    Tererai is referring to the early childhood, school health and community-wide literacy program, known as Literacy Boost, (recently profiled in The New York Times) that will get underway in the next few months. The programs seek to boost kids reading and writing skills in their local language of Shona and in English, and to nurture healthy life-long readers and learners.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Jennifer Kaleba 202.640.6613 (O) 202.258.8842 (M)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. (January 31, 2012) — This Valentine's Day, give children living in poverty a lifelong love of reading to help break the lifelong cycle of poverty, one Valentine at a time.

    Save the Children's U.S. Programs and the organization's artist ambassador Julianne Moore have invited beloved children's book authors and illustrators Ian Falconer, Kevin Henkes, Leuyen Pham, Brian Selznick and Mo Willems to design limited-edition Valentine's cards benefiting Save the Children's U.S. Programs "Love to Read, Read to Live" campaign.

    "Nearly 1 in 4 children in the U.S. lives in poverty and most of them don't have any books in their homes," said Moore, who credits her upbringing as an "Army kid" living all over the country for opening her eyes to the reality of poverty in the United States. "You can see why these kids often fall behind in school, and then in life."

    More than 60 percent of low-income households have no books at all in their homes and only about one-third of American fourth-graders are proficient in reading. When poverty is added into the mix, a student who can't read on grade level by 3rd grade is 13 times less likely to graduate on time than his or her more proficient peers.

    "Every child deserves a fair chance at a bright future," said Mark Shriver, Save the Children's Senior Vice President for U.S. Programs. "But we know that without resources like books in the home, in- and after-school reading support, and educational interventions so common in well-funded communities, these 16 million kids living in poverty will be left behind."

    This preventable, educational divide is why Save the Children and Moore are promoting sharing the love of reading to support the lifelong literacy of kids living in poverty in the United States. For a $25 donation, purchasers get a 30-card boxed set of limited-edition Valentines from artists your children know and love. All proceeds go to Save the Children to support education, health and resiliency programs in the United States, and your donation is tax deductible.

    To give your child Valentines that keep on giving, order your cards by February 6 to ensure delivery on time for Valentine's Day! Save the Children's Valentine's Day cards are available at www.savethechildren.org/valentines or by calling 1.800.728.3843.

    About Save the Children's U.S. Programs

    Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to a quality education, healthy foods and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 147,000 children and families in the United States last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Children's Lives Improving through Education; Bulgari Employees Given the Chance to See Results First-Hand

    Bulgari is bringing education to cattle-herding kids in Southern Sudan. Photo credit: Emmanuel Kenyi.
    Bulgari is bringing education to cattle-herding kids in Southern Sudan. Photo credit: Emmanuel Kenyi.

    Media Contact
    Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
    Jennifer Kaleba 202.640.6613 (O) 202.258.8842 (M)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (January 31, 2012) – Save the Children and Bulgari today announced that they will renew their education partnership for two more years, and Bulgari will commit to raise at least an additional $4 million dollars through 2013 for education programs worldwide, including in the United States.

    Part of Bulgari's new commitment will come from the sales of its specially-designed silver and ceramic ring. Sales of the ring in 2011 exceeded the company's objectives and contributed to the nearly $16 million dollars in donations to Save the Children since 2009. The iconic Bulgari ring, inspired by the unique B.zero.1 jewelry line and launched in October 2010, is available in Bulgari stores worldwide, select department stores, and on Bulgari's e-commerce website (active in the USA and Japan) for $420 each, of which $90 will be donated to Save the Children.

    "We are grateful to Bulgari for continuing to champion a quality education for underprivileged children around the globe. Every child deserves to get an education where they learn basic reading, writing and math skills," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "A good education lifts children out of poverty and gives them the tools to realize anything is possible."

    Miles added, "Through Bulgari's commitment and the support of its customers through ring sales to date, Save the Children is already helping preschool children in Afghanistan and India become early readers, taking school to the cattle camps in Southern Sudan where children live and work, and training teachers in remote regions of China on how to adapt their teaching methods for children who speak only ethnic minority languages."

    Bulgari's financial commitment is improving the life of some of the world's neediest children in over 20 countries around the world, including Albania, Afghanistan, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Democratic Republic of China, Haiti, Indonesia, India, Italy, Mexico, Montenegro, Japan, Kenya, Ivory Coast, Southern Sudan, Tunisia, Uganda, United Kingdom and the United States.

    Recognizing that there is no development without education, Bulgari's key focus is to provide quality education opportunities to transform children's lives. Over its three-year partnership with Save the Children, Bulgari's contribution has helped the global charity reach more than 344,000 preschoolers and children, train over 10,000 teachers and provide learning activities in more than 1,200 schools.

    Beyond education, Bulgari is supporting Save the Children's rapid response to emergencies. Bulgari immediately supported Save the Children's work in the disaster-affected areas of Haiti and the northeast of Japan, as well as in the Ivory Coast, when recent civil war threatened the security of thousands of children.

    This year, as part of its corporate charitable activities, Bulgari will kick off an employee engagement program for its dedicated sales staff around the globe. A group of employees will visit Save the Children's education programs to see first-hand how the partnership is helping children reach their full potential, and how much of a difference Bulgari can make for these children.

    Bulgari is part of the LVMH Group. Founded in Rome in 1884 as a single jewelry shop and progressively imposed itself with its magnificent jewelry creations, emblems of the Italian excellence. The international success made the company evolve into the current dimension of a global and diversified player in the luxury market, with a store network in the most exclusive shopping areas worldwide and a portfolio of product and services ranging from jewels and watches to accessories, perfumes and hotels.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Jennifer Kaleba 202.640.6613 (O) 202.258.8842 (M)
    Stephanie Spanos 608.830.4496 (W)

    WASHINGTON, D.C., (January 23, 2012) — American Girl's new 2012 Girl of the Year®, McKenna™, will help children across the United States become better readers through the McKenna Online Initiative promoting Save the Children's U.S. Literacy Programs. Introduced this January, McKenna is a skilled gymnast whose confidence tumbles when she starts having difficulty with reading comprehension — an issue affecting many children as they enter fourth grade, particularly the 16 million children living in poverty. Through McKenna, girls will discover the power of believing in themselves and their potential to achieve great things.

    "We are grateful for American Girl's support of our literacy programs that help children right here in the United States become better readers and more successful in school and life," said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children, explaining that only one third of American fourth graders are proficient in reading, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress. "McKenna will help draw national attention to the critical need to improve the reading skills of children across America."

    McKenna is available for one year and will launch with two books that tell her story; a beautiful 18-inch McKenna doll featuring long, caramel-colored hair and brilliant blue eyes; and an array of outfits and accessories that bring her world to life for girls.

    Written by acclaimed author Mary Casanova, the 2012 Girl of the Year books, McKenna and McKenna, Ready to Fly!, introduce readers to McKenna Brooks™, a determined, energetic girl who loves gymnastics, McKenna shines on the balance beam, but when she falls behind in school, she must use her strengths to turn challenges into triumphs. With the help of her tutor, McKenna learns to bring the same focus and determination she uses in her gymnastics training to improve her reading skills and get her grades back up. As McKenna's self-assurance deepens, so does her desire to help her friends face their own challenges. The nonfiction section in the back of the McKenna books features questions and advice from real girls on overcoming obstacles in the classroom and beyond.

    To explore their own special talents, girls can participate in the McKenna's Take the Challenge! strength-finding quiz at americangirl.com/girloftheyear. Upon completion of the quiz, girls will discover their top three strengths out of a possible eight categories, such as Music & Rhythm, Math & Numbers, and Nature & Animals. After completing ten fun offline challenges that correspond to a particular strength category, girls will receive a trophy. And for each trophy earned through August 31, 2012, American Girl will donate 25¢ (up to $50,000) to Save the Children's U.S. Literacy Program.

    American Girl is also introducing a companion book to the McKenna series, Take the Challenge: Crazy Challenges and Silly Thrills to Explore Your Talents and Everyday Skills. The non-fiction activity book is filled with more than 100 challenges, including brain-building games, timed tasks, crafts, and quizzes, to help girls improve their skills and boost their self-confidence.

    Starting in January, the McKenna doll, books, and accessories will be available for one year or while supplies last through American Girl's catalogue, at americangirl.com, and at all American Girl retail locations. To request a free American Girl catalogue, call 1-800-845-0005.

    About Save the Children's U.S. Programs

    Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to a quality education, healthy foods and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters like hurricanes and wildfires strike, Save the Children is among the first on the ground ensuring the needs of children are being met.

    Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 147,000 children and families in the United States last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

    About American Girl

    American Girl Brands is a wholly owned subsidiary of Mattel (NASDAQ:MAT), the world's leading toy company. Since American Girl's inception in 1986, the company has devoted its entire business to celebrating the potential of girls ages 3 to 12. American Girl encourages girls to dream, to grow, to aspire, to create, and to imagine through a wide range of engaging and insightful books, age-appropriate and educational products, and unforgettable experiences. In meeting its mission with a vigilant eye toward quality and service, American Girl has earned the loyal following of millions of girls and the praise and trust of parents and educators. To learn more about American Girl or to request a free catalogue, call 1-800-845-0005, or visit www.americangirl.com.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O), 202.294.9700 (M)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (January 18, 2012) – Thousands of needless deaths occurred and millions of extra dollars were spent because the international community failed to take decisive action on early warnings of a hunger crisis in the Horn of Africa, according to a new report by the international aid agencies Oxfam and Save the Children.

    The report, A Dangerous Delay, says a culture of risk aversion caused a six-month delay in the large-scale aid effort because humanitarian agencies and national governments were too slow to scale up their response to the crisis, and many donors wanted proof of a humanitarian catastrophe before acting to prevent one.

    Sophisticated early warning systems first forecast a likely emergency as early as August 2010 but the full-scale response was not launched until July 2011 when malnutrition rates in parts of the region had gone far beyond the emergency threshold and there was high profile media coverage of the crisis.

    Save the Children and Oxfam say more funding for food emergencies should be sought and released as soon as the crisis signs are clear, rather than the current system that funds large-scale emergency work only when hunger levels have reached tipping-point. By this time, lives have already been lost and the cost of the response is much greater. The agencies are calling on governments to overhaul their response to food crises, as laid out in the Charter to End Extreme Hunger, a document that has already received backing from key international figures.

    “The humanitarian community needs to come together and raise its voice louder so governments and donors know the gravity of crises such as the one in the Horn of Africa,” said Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. “By the time the world sees starving children on TV, it’s too late. Tens of thousands of deaths could have been prevented had aid groups and governments received funding earlier to scale up programs.”

    Although it is impossible to calculate exactly how many people died as a result of drought, the U.S. government estimates that more than 29,000 children under age 5 died in 90 days from May to July. Today, Somalia remains the most acute food crisis in the world, with hundreds of thousands of people still at risk.

    Some positive action by governments did take place – such as improved early warning systems and social protection schemes that meant families were given some early support. But overall, the scale of crisis outstripped these efforts, and more costly interventions had to be taken at a later stage.

    Trucking a little over a gallon of water per day per person to 80,000 people in Ethiopia costs more than $3 million for five months, compared with $900,000 to prepare water sources in the same area for an oncoming drought. Across East Africa, providing early support to families to keep their animals healthy and markets functioning would have helped prevent soaring malnutrition rates, as hundreds of thousands lost their livelihoods when their livestock was wiped out by drought.

    “We all bear responsibility for this dangerous delay that cost lives in East Africa and need to learn the lessons of the late response,” said Oxfam’s Chief Executive, Barbara Stocking. “It’s shocking that the poorest people are still bearing the brunt of a failure to respond swiftly and decisively. We know that acting early saves lives but collective risk aversion meant aid agencies were reluctant to spend money until they were certain there was a crisis.”

    The report, which comes ahead of global meetings at Davos and the African Union, is a timely reminder that the international community must act fast to avert disaster in West Africa, where a looming food crisis threatens to affect millions of people. A recent Save the Children assessment in Niger shows families in the worst hit areas are already struggling with around one third less food, money and fuel than is necessary to survive.

    Kofi Annan, Chair of the Africa Progress Panel said: “Achieving global food and nutrition security is the challenge of our time, and our success in alleviating widespread hunger will depend, in large part, on our ability to identify the early warning signs of food crises, and respond immediately and effectively.”

    Further reforms to tackle hunger crises like the East Africa emergency are set out in the Charter to End Extreme Hunger, a joint-agency initiative, which urges governments to fulfil their responsibilities and take concrete steps to stop catastrophic food crises from happening again. Read the full report.

    ###

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contact
    Lane Hartill 202.640.6608 (O), 202.294.9700 (M)

    WESTPORT, Conn. (January 13, 2012) — Two years after the Haiti earthquake, a severe funding shortage is threatening recovery programs in the country and putting children's futures at risk, warns Save the Children.

    Save the Children is calling for the international community to fulfill its existing commitments to Haiti and increase long-term funding to build on the significant achievements made since the earthquake, as well as to scale up efforts to address the continuing cholera crisis.

    Since the earthquake, Save the Children has reached 500,000 people through medical services, cholera clinics and hygiene programs. Some 40,000 people were given long-term access to clean water. Save the Children has also rebuilt 38 schools in earthquake-affected areas benefiting 13,575 children.

    But Haiti is a complex environment and large-scale needs remain.

    "While we see signs of change in Haiti, there are still approximately 500,000 people living in makeshift tents," said Gary Shaye, Save the Children's Country Director in Haiti. "Children living in these conditions are extremely vulnerable to events such as hurricanes and outbreaks of diseases. Only six months from the next hurricane season, a long-term solution needs to be found before another emergency occurs."

    Shaye warned that with insufficient long-term funding, Save the Children's support for children and families affected by the earthquake could be in danger. This work, in addition to helping people to prepare for future disasters, is crucial to ensure that Haiti's children can survive their childhoods and develop to their fullest potential.

    "Save the Children has raised almost three-quarters of the total needed but with emergency funds drying up for Haiti, our plan for recovery is being placed in jeopardy," added Shaye. "The challenge now is to continue the momentum. If we stop now, the gains that have been made for Haitian families could be lost."

    Note to Editors:

    A devastating earthquake struck Haiti on January 12, 2010. More than 220,000 people were killed and 2.3 million others were displaced in one of the worse natural disasters the world has ever seen. In October 2010, humanitarian efforts were further challenged by a cholera epidemic which continues today and has claimed over 6,700 lives according to the United Nations.

    In 2010, Save the Children set a fundraising target of $175 million to fund a five-year strategy for recovery in Haiti. To date, we have raised about $128 million, but having spent $100 million responding to the triple crises of the earthquake, cholera outbreak and Hurricane Tomas, we still require need $47 million more over the next three years.

    So far, Save the Children's work has included:

    • Emergency support to more than 270 schools in the first year, enabling more than 45,000 children to return to their studies and complete the 2010-2011 school year.
    • More than 31,500 children have been enrolled in 176 schools reached by Save the Children's Quality Education Initiative, which focuses on teacher and school administrator training, providing teaching and classroom materials and formation of parent support groups.
    • Overall, some 650 schools have been repaired. Some 75 percent of children living in tent camps attend school. And, according to the United Nations, 1.1 million children are receiving a daily meal at school.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    15 Major Global Health Organizations Urge U.S. Government to Focus on Frontline Health Workers as "Best Buy" to Save Lives and Accelerate Progress on Global Health Threats

    Media Contact:
    Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

    WASHINGTON, DC (January 11 , 2012) — Save the Children and partners today launch a new and diverse coalition of 15 major global health organizations calling on the U.S. government for more strategic investment in frontline health workers.

    The Frontline Health Workers Coalition — whose membership also includes The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Partners in Health and World Vision — says investments in frontline health workers in the developing world is the most cost-effective way to save the lives of mothers and children, address AIDS and other global health threats, and help advance U.S. economic and strategic interests.

    The coalition launched today with the release of a new report focusing on the need for frontline health workers, and is calling on the U.S. administration to train and support an additional 250,000 new frontline health workers — and to better support the capacity and impact of existing workers where the need is greatest.

    Frontline health workers are often the only link to health care for millions of children and their families in the developing world who live beyond the reach of hospitals and clinics. These workers — mostly community health workers and midwives, but also doctors and nurses who may be serving at the community level — can provide families with a range of proven, life-saving services including maternal and newborn care, child health, and management of chronic and communicable diseases, such as tuberculosis, AIDS and diabetes. Yet according to the World Health Organization, there is a global shortage of at least one million frontline health workers.

    "The world has experienced dramatic declines in deaths thanks largely to the care provided by these local health heroes," says Save the Children's Mary Beth Powers, who is chair of the new coalition. "But despite this progress, nearly 21,000 children still die every day, most from preventable causes, and 1,000 girls and women die each day in pregnancy and childbirth. Investing in the technologies and medicines to prevent and treat diseases is important, but insufficient. Simply put, without health workers to deliver the lifesaving medicines and information, there is no pathway to good health."

    New Report Lays Out Case for Investment in Frontline Health Workers

    The new Coalition report documents why frontline health workers are a good investment, including:

    • Frontline health workers are the backbone of effective health systems and the only way to serve millions of families who live beyond the reach of hospitals and clinics;
    • Frontline health workers are relatively inexpensive to train and support. It can cost as little as $300 to train a frontline health worker in crucial lifesaving skills;
    • Frontline health workers are less likely to migrate from their communities to search for higher-paying jobs;
    • Frontline health workers are trusted in their community and deliver services in sync with local needs and cultural beliefs, and can help ensure care reaches those who need it most;
    • In countries — such as Ethiopia, Bangladesh and Nepal – where public and private investments to strengthen frontline health workers have been made, deaths due to preventable causes have decreased and populations are healthier and population growth rates are slowing; and
    • Investing in health in developing countries can also help advance U.S. strategic interests by building more stable, prosperous communities.

    Additionally, eight corporations are coordinating with the new Frontline Health Workers Coalition to bolster the private sector's ongoing work to increase the number of trained health workers, improve retention rates among existing health workers, and enhance the capacity of existing health workers.

    Current members of the Frontline Health Workers Coalition include Abt Associates, AMREF, Family Care International, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, GAPPS (Global Alliance to Prevent Prematurity and Stillbirth), IAPAC (International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care), IntraHealth International, Jhpiego, Partners In Health, PSI, Public Health Institute, RESULTS, Save the Children, White Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood, and World Vision. For more information, visit the coalition's new website www.frontlinehealthworkers.com.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



    Media Contacts
    Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
    Hannah Brencher 203.216.7417

    A new IKEA grant will provide much-needed teacher training and learning materials for teachers and children in Haiti. Photo credit: Susan Warner
    A new IKEA grant will provide much-needed teacher training and learning materials for teachers and children in Haiti. Photo credit: Susan Warner

    WESTPORT, CONN. (Jan. 11, 2012) — Two years following the devastating Haiti quake, Save the Children has received a $400,000 donation from the IKEA Foundation for a literacy program for Haitian children. The donation will help improve children's literacy in Haiti by providing learning kits and teaching aids to new teachers, and supplying basic school materials like books, pens and pencils to schoolchildren.

    When the earthquake struck Haiti on Jan. 12, 2010, it damaged or destroyed 90% of the schools in Port-au-Prince and Leogane, and more than 60% of schools in the South and West departments. Even before the Haiti disaster, children's hopes of receiving a quality education were grim. Many classrooms had over 60 students, and half of the children aged six to 12 attended school.

    "Our aim in Haiti has been to help kids recover from the quake," explains Per Heggenes, CEO of the IKEA Foundation, "but also to improve their reading and writing skills by supporting innovative new educational programs."

    "We appreciate the IKEA Foundation's support for education of Haitian children," said Carolyn Miles, CEO & president of Save the Children. "Since the quake, hundreds of schools have been repaired, more teachers have been trained and many kids are back in school. But, this is just a small fraction of what is needed to get education back on track after the quake. This IKEA Foundation donation will help us train teachers and provide much-needed teaching and school supplies."

    Better Access and Quality

    Save the Children works closely with schools, Parent-Teacher Associations (PTAs) and Haiti's Ministry of Education to improve girls' and boys' access to a quality education.

    The program has set ambitious goals for the upcoming year. By training 120 teachers, 20 school principals and 10 school inspectors, as many as 4,000 children will benefit from this approach to improving quality. The program also focuses on getting parents involved in the schools, with plans to motivate 200 parents to join PTAs and become advocates for education in their communities.

    Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

    The IKEA Foundation aims to improve the opportunities for children and youth by funding holistic, long-term programs that can create substantial, lasting change, and enable them to take charge of their own future. We work with strong strategic partners applying innovative approaches to achieve large-scale results in four fundamental areas of a child's life: home, health, education and family income. Currently funded programs benefit an estimated 100 million children.


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