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Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

Juba, South Sudan (Dec. 30, 2013) — Thousands of children are likely to have been separated from their families as a result of the latest violence in South Sudan, with many surviving on their own in very remote and hard-to-reach areas. Many have witnessed their parents being killed and their homes looted or destroyed. Save the Children is highly concerned for their safety and welfare.

More than 121,000 people fled their homes when fighting broke out two weeks ago, leading to a chaotic situation in which many families became separated. On 27 December, in one of the UN compounds sheltering civilians in the nation's capital Juba, Save the Children identified more than 20 children who were without their parents or any other adult caregiver. Yet the phenomenon is likely to be much worse in areas such as Jonglei where the fighting has been at its most intense.

Many of the people who fled sought protection in UN bases, while others looked for shelter with host communities in safer areas. Most worryingly, thousands of others, including children, are likely to have fled to the remote bush; vast swampy areas where people will likely have no shelter and will be living under trees, will be forced to drink stagnant water, and where they will have no access to humanitarian support.

"Identifying children who have been separated and reuniting them with their families is a priority for us, and we are working around the clock in displaced camps in Juba to ensure that families have access to their basic needs", said Save the Children's Country Director for South Sudan, Fiona McSheehy. "But we are very concerned that we cannot reach other parts of the country where the fighting has been escalating and where the needs of children are rising sharply."

Save the Children has a vast experience of responding to the needs of families affected by fighting in South Sudan and identifying and reuniting separated children. "During the conflict in Pibor earlier this year, Save the Children registered over 1,150 children who had been separated from their parents as a result of the fighting. This was in just one county of South Sudan," McSheehy said. "The recent violence has extended to over half the country, and we are extremely worried about the high numbers of vulnerable children who urgently need our support, but who we cannot access because of the ongoing fighting."

Save the Children is working in the two UN compounds in Juba where displaced people are currently seeking refuge, to assess and protect vulnerable children, including by ensuring they can access shelter, food and healthcare and to support the provision of emergency relief items. Save the Children has pre-existing programs in many of the states, including Jonglei and Upper Nile, which have been affected by the current conflict and where it is running health, education and nutrition projects. With an extensive presence across South Sudan, the aid agency is preparing to scale up its response in other areas as soon as it is possible to do so.

  • On 24 December Save the Children brought in the first plane-load of emergency aid items to South Sudan. These included jerry cans, kitchen sets, plastic sheeting and water bladders. Through strong collaboration and coordination with other agencies these items have been able to support the affected population in the UN compounds in Juba.
  • Save the Children is planning to bring in more aid supplies over the coming days to provide to displaced people in Juba and to also support other affected areas as security improves.
  • In Juba we are providing vital protection support to vulnerable children, including child-headed households, to ensure they have access to food and healthcare.
  • Save the Children is working to identify children who have been separated from their parents, and reuniting them where possible or providing them with necessary support.
  • We are planning to scale up its child protection work in Juba, providing children with psychosocial support to help them cope with trauma and access to safe play areas.
  • Save the Children remains committed to supporting the population of South Sudan in both its emergency response activities related to the current conflict affected population, and also to support the longer term development needs of the newest country in the world.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153
Wendy Christian, 203.465.8010

 UNMISS peacekeepers have been assisting displaced civilians in South Sudan by providing protection, building sanitation and providing medical support. UN Photo/UNMISS

UNMISS peacekeepers have been assisting displaced civilians in South Sudan by providing protection, building sanitation and providing medical support. UN Photo/UNMISS

WESTPORT, Conn. (Dec. 23, 2013) — A special Save the Children flight will arrive in South Sudan on Tuesday, Dec. 24, carrying supplies for families who have fled their homes due to fighting.

These supplies will be used to help alleviate the conditions of those families seeking safety in United Nations compounds in Juba and include: 150 jerry cans, kitchen sets for 140 families, 140 waterproof sheets, and two large water bladders that each hold 5,000 liters.

The one metric ton of supplies will add to those supplies already warehoused by Save the Children in South Sudan. The flight is taking off from Nairobi and is scheduled to arrive in Juba, South Sudan, Tuesday morning. Save the Children, which has been working in South Sudan for more than three decades, has maintained essential staff there in order to meet the humanitarian needs of children in the country.

(Save the Children's South Sudan country director Fiona McSheehy is available for interview.)

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

Liza, 11 pins her Christmas wish to a Christmas tree at a Save the Children-run Christmas party in Estancia, Philippines, one of the communities hard-hit by Typhoon Haiyan. Photo by Jacob Maentz/Save The Children.
Liza, 11 pins her Christmas wish to a Christmas tree at a Save the Children-run Christmas party in Estancia, Philippines, one of the communities hard-hit by Typhoon Haiyan. Photo by Jacob Maentz/Save The Children.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Dec. 23, 2013) — More than 1,500 Filipino children whose homes and communities were devastated in Typhoon Haiyan are enjoying Christmas parties hosted by Save the Children.

In and around the devastated city of Tacloban, seasonal events have been held at 27 child friendly spaces. While in Estancia — a badly damaged municipality 300 miles away – parties with games like pass the parcel were also arranged for typhoon-affected children.

More than six weeks after one of the fiercest storms ever recorded lashed the country, about 4.1 million people in the Philippines are still displaced. Some of these evacuated families are living in schools.

Romulo, age 11, said: "We live in classrooms. It is not our home. But we have no other option. If we live in our own house I think we would get sick because of the oil spill."

Romulo helps his parents look after his three younger siblings. He would like school materials for Christmas, as everything except his science notebook has been destroyed.

Eugene, age 12, said: "The strong winds blew the roof off my house — I was inside at the time. I was so afraid we would die."

For Christmas, Eugene would like restored nature and hope in the Philippines.

Liza, age 11, said: "My family has tried to rebuild our home and we have put some tarpaulin over the roof, but there are still gaps."

She would like Santa to bring a Christmas tree and lots of presents.

Ned Olney, country director for Save the Children in the Philippines, said: "Christmas will be a somber time in the Philippines this year. It will be especially tough for the children who were made homeless and lost loved ones during typhoon Haiyan."

"We are doing everything we can to give them basics like food and shelter, a chance to learn in temporary schools, and some fun with activities like the Christmas parties."

"Thanks to everyone who gave to Philippines relief appeals and made this possible."

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

A mother with a 3 week old baby in a displacement camp in Bangui which houses thousands of people sheltering from the fighting going on in Bangui, Central African Republic. December 2013. Photo: Greg Funnell / Save the Children
A mother with a 3 week old baby in a displacement camp in Bangui, which is home to thousands of people sheltering from the fighting going on in Central African Republic. December 2013. Photo: Greg Funnell/Save the Children

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Dec. 13, 2013) — Save the Children teams in the Central African Republic are helping to treat children as young as three who have suffered machete and gunshot wounds.

As CAR slides further into anarchy, the number of children conscripted into armed groups has also more than doubled to at least 6,000 in recent months, according to UN figures. Beyond the physical harm, children are increasingly traumatized by what they have witnessed and experienced. Save the Children has spoken to many children who are struggling to cope, including one boy who had seen both his parents killed in the clashes.

"One of the things that will stay with me is seeing young children with machete and gunshot wounds, some of whom had to be amputated. The majority of these injuries will debilitate these children for the rest of their lives," said Dr. Ngezahayo Zephyrin coordinates Merlin and Save the Children's medical activities in Nana-Mambéré.

As fighting and instability continue across the country, the humanitarian situation threatens to spiral out of control. Health posts and hospitals have been looted and destroyed, and the Ministry of Health has only a handful surgeons for a population of 4.6 million people. At present, an estimated half a million people – many of them children - have been forced to flee their homes. They are vulnerable to disease, hunger and attacks by armed groups.

To date, Save the Children has reached nearly 40,000 children, focusing on health, child protection and nutrition. In addition to our ongoing humanitarian programs, we are currently supporting clinics and hospitals and setting up new child protection spaces in the capital, Bangui, to meet the needs of the thousands of people who have been displaced by the violence. But our work has been hampered by continuing insecurity and difficulty accessing many areas, mostly rural, affected by the violence.

Save the Children's CEO in the UK, Justin Forsyth, who just returned from the Central African Republic, said "The situation that I saw in the CAR this week was desperate. I saw a 6 year-old girl, Celine, who had lost her arm after being shot while fleeing an attack – just one of countless children who have been injured and killed in the clashes. We welcome the decision to deploy a larger African Union and French force with a stronger civilian protection mandate. But this UN-mandated force must urgently deploy outside of Bangui, to the remotest regions where so much of the violence goes on unseen."

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

Education Interrupted
Read the full report.

NEW YORK (December 13, 2013) — The decline in education for Syrian children has been the sharpest and most rapid in the history of the region, according to a new paper published today.

"Education Interrupted" highlights that since 2011 nearly 3 million children from Syria have been forced to quit their education as fighting has destroyed classrooms, left children too terrified to go to school, or seen families flee the country. Progress achieved over decades has been reversed in under three years.

The paper is the first attempt to quantify the full extent of the staggering decline in education in a country where primary school attendance rates stood at 97 per cent before the conflict began in 2011.

More than 1,000 days of bloodshed in Syria have seen millions of children lose their education, schools and teachers.

At best, children are getting sporadic education. At worst, they drop out of schools and are forced to work to support their families.

Inside Syria, 1 in every 5 schools cannot be used because they have been damaged, destroyed or are sheltering internally displaced persons, says the paper. In countries hosting Syrian refugees, between 500,000-600,000 Syrian refugee children are out of school.

The worst affected areas inside Syria are those where fierce violence is taking place – including A-Raqqa, Idlib, Aleppo, Deir Ezzour, Hama, Dara’a and Rural Damascus. In some of these areas attendance rates have plummeted to as low as 6 per cent.

Syria was a regional leader in education enrolment before the conflict, yet in less than three years the sharpest regression in education of anywhere in the region occurred with dire consequences for the future.

The paper details some of the factors that have contributed to the rapid emptying of classrooms.

Inside Syria, intensifying violence, large population displacement, the killing and flight of teachers and the destruction and mis-use of schools have all made learning more difficult for children. Many parents report that they have no option but to keep their children at home rather than risk sending them to school.

In neighbouring countries different language and dialect, different curricula, limited or no learning spaces, physical safety, poverty, and community tensions are keeping children away from classes. Meanwhile, children and teachers from host communities are faced with over-crowded classrooms and increased pressure on education systems.

The paper also sets out critical actions that – if taken now – could reverse the slide. These include:

  • Protection of education infrastructure inside Syria – including ending the use of schools for military purposes, declaring schools as zones of peace, and holding accountable those parties to the conflict who violate the protection of schools.
  • Doubling of international investment for education in host countries to expand and improve learning spaces, recruit additional teachers and slash the costs of getting children into classrooms.
  • Innovative approaches to overcome education needs of Syrian refugee children through such as transferrable certification for refugee students.
  • Scaling up proven models such as home-based learning, non-formal learning centres and child-friendly spaces that provide psychosocial support for children.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Dec. 12, 2013) — As cold winter storms hit Lebanon and Jordan, Save the Children staff worked through the night in Za'atari refugee camp in Jordan evacuating families whose tents had flooded due to the snow into our child-friendly spaces and providing them with warm food and blankets. Staff members are distributing children's winter clothing and winter kits for adults as snow continues to fall.

In Lebanon, refugees living in flimsy tented settlements in the Bekaa Valley have found their makeshift homes covered in snow as the start of the brutal winter in northern Lebanon sets in. Conditions are set to get worse over the coming months of winter as the number of refugees arriving in Lebanon continues to rise.

This snow is the first sign of the treacherous winter in the region that will only increase suffering for children and their families until March. Between November and February, temperatures can drop below freezing in the region and with more than two million refugees — one million of them children — the humanitarian crisis will worsen in the coming months.

Save the Children has been distributing kits containing winter clothing, blankets and items to reinforce shelters to help prepare families for the winter in Jordan, Lebanon and Iraq, and will continue to provide support to them over the winter.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Jillian Holzer 202.999.4483
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

To learn about the Right to Learn report view the executive summary or the full report
To learn more about the report, view the executive summary or the full report.

NEW YORK (Dec. 11, 2013) — Parents throughout developing countries are frustrated by the staggering 40 percent of primary-school-age children who are unable to read, write, or do basic math by fourth grade, according to a new report.

Save the Children released the report, "Right to Learn," this afternoon at the United Nations during a presentation co-sponsored by Women Thrive Worldwide, UNICEF, the UN's Global Education First Initiative, UNESCO, ASER Pakistan, and the Center for Universal Education at Brookings Institution. The report's insights come as the global community considers next steps to the UN's Millennium Development Goals – the world's largest anti-poverty effort ever – which expire in December 2015.

The current set of goals have led to record numbers of girls and boys attending school, but learning outcomes in many areas remain grossly inadequate for preparing students to reach their professional aspirations as adults.

Parents and advocates from India to Zimbabwe report high teacher absenteeism, overcrowded classrooms, poor facilities, lack of books and more.

"We are facing a real and global crisis in learning," said Meredy Talbot-Zorn, global development manager at Save the Children and co-author of the report. "Parents are frustrated. Right now, we are failing them, and failing children."

"This is a call to action for anyone who cares about the world's children," said Laura Henderson, director of education policy at Women Thrive Worldwide, and a reviewer of the report. "This report brings parents' concerns directly to the world leaders who will shape education priorities around the world."

The report shows that while parents expect their children to learn basic skills at school, they face many barriers for holding schools, service providers and government accountable. The report also cites several country examples of where parents and stakeholders are working together to improve accountability for children's progress in learning and getting positive results. The findings of the report are based on qualitative research in seven countries, including Brazil, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Nepal, South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe.

"When the current Millennium Development Goals were being created, parents and advocates from developing countries were largely left out from being able to provide input," continued Henderson. "That can't happen again. World leaders need to be accountable to parents for the quality of education that their children receive."

Save the Children has included six recommendations for UN institutions and member states to get education and learning for children right:

  • Ensure that voices from developing countries – especially civil society – inform the post-2015 framework and surrounding policy discussions.
  • Seize the opportunity during the post-2015 negotiations to advance an ambitious equitable learning goal for the next global framework.
  • Improve data collection that allows every country to reliably measure progress on learning outcomes and put systems in place to disaggregate data.
  • Commit to increased funding and target vital educational resources to the most marginalized groups in countries.
  • Improve accountability to local stakeholders by supporting both a global post-2015 equitable learning goal, and participatory, national level decision making to create national targets and indicators.
  • Empower all communities with information and transparency on school performance.

"There's just too much at stake for decision-makers not to listen to parents and advocates in developing countries about what needs to be done to improve education and learning for the world's children," said Talbot-Zorn.

To speak with an expert on global education, please contact Jillian Holzer or 202.999.4483.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact(s)
Jeremy Soulliere 203.341.8203 or 203.295.5842

Volunteer model Karen Werner shows of some of the latest fashions at “A Festive Evening on the Avenue,” a fashion show fundraiser to benefit Save the Children’s emergency-relief efforts in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Photo by Jeremy Soulliere.
Volunteer model Karen Werner shows of some of the latest fashions at "A Festive Evening on the Avenue," a fashion show fundraiser to benefit Save the Children's emergency-relief efforts in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Photo by Jeremy Soulliere.

GREENWICH, Conn. (Dec. 6, 2012) — Volunteer models hit the catwalk Thursday night at Saks Fifth Avenue in Greenwich, exhibiting some of the latest fashions, while also raising funds and awareness for Save the Children's relief efforts in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines.

The holiday benefit, "A Festive Evening on the Avenue," was hosted by Saks Fifth Avenue and Save the Children's Greenwich Leadership Council, which supports Save the Children through awareness, advocacy and fundraising.

Attendees of the annual event also had the chance to get makeovers and do some holiday shopping, with all ticket sales from the event and 10 percent of shopping proceeds going to Save the Children's Typhoon Haiyan relief.

"The Greenwich Leadership Council is so fortunate to have such a strong base in Greenwich to support Save the Children, especially in times of crisis," said Angelique Bell, president of Save the Children's Greenwich Leadership Council. "The evening was a tremendous success once again thanks to Saks and their amazing leadership, and this year's chair, Deanna Bastianich, did an outstanding job, from recruiting stunning local philanthropist models, to creating a wonderful environment, which put people in a festive and generous mood. Gary Shayes from Save the Children also gave an insightful perspective on the depth of the crisis in the Philippines, and why the need there is so great."

Sonia Hedvat and other volunteer models show off some of the latest fashions at “A Festive Evening on the Avenue.” Photo by Jeremy Soulliere.
Sonia Hedvat and other volunteer models show off some of the latest fashions at "A Festive Evening on the Avenue." Photo by Jeremy Soulliere.

Save the Children has worked in the Philippines for 30 years and was one of the first international humanitarian agencies on the ground when the typhoon hit. Within a week of the disaster, the global relief and development organization had flown in more than 100 tons of aid, including shelter, hygiene and health equipment, from three different continents.

Access to people in need was initially severely limited due to damaged roads, fallen trees, debris, and the destruction of airports, but as of Nov. 29, Save the Children had already reached more than 40,000 people with assistance. It also plans to reach more than 760,000 people, including more than 522,000 children, with its efforts focused on the badly hit areas of Leyte, Capiz and Iloilo provinces.

"Save the Children is tremendously grateful to the Greenwich Leadership Council and Saks Fifth Avenue for committing their time to raise funds for our emergency-relief efforts in the Philippines," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children president and CEO. "An estimated 5.6 million children have been affected by Typhoon Haiyan, with many witnessing the devastation first-hand, as their homes, schools and communities were swept away. Local fundraisers like these can go a long way to beginning to help these children and families recover."

Since Typhoon Haiyan, Save the Children has raised $7.2 million toward its typhoon relief efforts.

To support Save the Children's response to ongoing needs following the typhoon, donate to the Typhoon Haiyan Children's Relief Fund by visiting savethechildren.org/haiyan. Or text DONATE to 20222 to donate $10 to the typhoon relief fund from your mobile phone.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Statement from Save the Children CEO Carolyn Miles

Nelson Mandela knew that by investing in children we were investing in our collective future. He has often been quoted as saying that there can be no keener revelation of a society's soul than the way it treats its children and he demonstrated that commitment many times. In 1993 he donated his Nobel Peace prize money to children's charities and in 1995 he gave one-third of his presidential salary to establish the Nelson Mandela Children's Fund in South Africa.

His legacy will live on. Those who seek a voice will borrow his. Those who find themselves in darkness will use his words for light. His fundamental respect for humanity and his love for children will continue to inspire South Africans and people of all nations to know that a better future is always possible. At this sad time, we must reflect on his life and recommit to building a world he would be proud of. A world in which all children, born equal, are given the strength to walk their own road. Today we weep for our loss, but we rejoice in a world deeply transformed by his having been here at all.

Rolihlahla Nelson Mandela (1918 – 2013)



Media Contacts
Jeremy Soulliere 203.295.5842
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171

Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles warms up the students at Side By Side Charter School in Norwalk, Conn., as they get ready to participate in the World Marathon Challenge on Sept. 23, to raise funds and awareness for Save the Children.
Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles warms up the students at Side By Side Charter School in Norwalk, Conn., as they get ready to participate in the World Marathon Challenge on Sept. 23, to raise funds and awareness for Save the Children.

Westport, Conn. (Dec. 2, 2013) — Forty one thousand children have participated in Save the Children's 2013 World Marathon Challenge, a global relay in which teams of children from around the world banded together to complete a full marathon distance of 26.2 miles. The students raced one another to attempt to break the world marathon record of 2 hours, 3 minutes and 23 seconds, while raising funds and awareness for Save the Children's programs focused on child survival and well-being.

"The amount of children who took on the World Marathon Challenge to help other children is truly inspiring," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "I want to congratulate each and every one of them. They have proven to be powerful advocates for their peers, and brought a tremendous amount of energy to our efforts to ensure all kids have a chance to survive and thrive."

In the United States, 124 World Marathon Challenge engagement events were held in 15 States, including Washington, D.C. Participating children laced up their sneakers and raised more than $88,000 to be used by Save the Children to provide child-focused interventions, ranging from offering newborn care advice to diagnosing and treating preventable diseases like diarrhea, pneumonia and malaria.

From left, Hailey, 12, passes the baton to Morgan, 15, a Junior. Both are members of the Connecticut Football Club, who participated in the Save the Children's World Marathon Challenge at Pomperaug High School in Southbury, Conn. on Saturday, Oct. 19, to raise funds and awareness for international relief and development agency Save the Children.
From left, Hailey, 12, passes the baton to Morgan, 15, a Junior. Both are members of the Connecticut Football Club, who participated in the Save the Children's World Marathon Challenge at Pomperaug High School in Southbury, Conn. on Saturday, Oct. 19, to raise funds and awareness for international relief and development agency Save the Children.

The worldwide relay races were held throughout October and early November, and saw hundreds of teams running simultaneously on Oct. 23, a global day of action.

"Well done to all the kids in Mozambique who ran in @SavetheChildren's relay marathon last month. Kids helping kids and staying fit by running. That's a winning combination," posted Save the Children artist ambassador Cristiano Ronaldo to Facebook in early November. The soccer superstar was cheering on more than 400 Mozambican runners who joined the global cause.

In addition to running in the race, students across America were advocates for other kids by urging Congress to protect programs that help children in the United States and around the world survive and thrive. At some relay race events, kids signed their name to a World Marathon Challenge-themed postcard and/or t-shirts, which were collected to be delivered to their respective congressional and senatorial leaders. Advocacy postcards and constituent signatures on t-shirts were collected in a number of districts, including those of U.S. Rep. Kay Granger (R-Texas), U.S. Rep. Jim Himes (D-Conn.), U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), and U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.).

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Save the Children Calls for Improved Care and Prevention of New Infections

Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Nov. 27, 2013) — As we mark World AIDS Day on Dec. 1, Save the Children remembers the millions of lives lost, and reaffirms its commitment to preventing HIV transmission and AIDS-related death. With more than 2.5 million children infected with the virus, according to UNAIDS, it is critical we work to improve care and treatment, while preventing more children from contracting it.

The global theme of World AIDS Day – 'Getting to Zero' – stands for zero new infections, zero AIDS-related death, and zero discrimination.

"An AIDS-free generation is no longer a dream. However, to achieve it, we cannot continue business as usual. Working together in a coordinated global effort guided by science, we must strive to protect children from HIV infection – from when they are yet unborn, through birth to adolescence. Furthermore, we must also keep children who are living with HIV free from AIDS," said Dr. Kechi Achebe, Save the Children's senior director for HIV/AIDS.

Remarkable progress has been made in combatting this deadly disease, but the spread of HIV/AIDS remains a challenge. Save the Children joins governments, including the U.S. government, bilateral agencies and non-governmental organizations, in supporting efforts to prevent and stop the spread of the disease, and supports expanded care and treatment efforts.

In June 2011, United Nations member states committed to a global plan for eliminating new HIV infections in children and keeping their mothers alive, as well as eliminating pediatric deaths from HIV and AIDS by 2015. However, the primary focus has been on prevention of maternal-to-child transmission (PMTCT). Early infant diagnosis and pediatric treatment for those children who will acquire HIV – and the more than 2.5 million children who are already living with HIV – has been neglected.

Studies have shown that children who receive antiretroviral therapy in their first day of life are less likely to contract the virus, yet an estimated 34 percent of infants exposed to HIV don't receive follow-up care, despite WHO guidelines calling for 100 percent treatment for all infected children under the age of 5.

Although prevention of new infections must remain a priority, we must strengthen efforts to improve care and treatment for those currently living with HIV – and those at risk of new infection.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WESTPORT, Conn. (Nov. 25, 2013) — Save the Children welcomes the United Nations’ announcement of Syria peace talks in Geneva on Jan. 22, 2014. Peace cannot come soon enough for Syria’s children, who are dying in their thousands and suffering in their millions because aid cannot reach them.

With the World Health Organization’s confirmation of cases of polio in Syrian children, we are heading towards an epidemic of this devastating disease unless vital vaccines reach the most vulnerable.

As the agenda for the talks is being considered, Save the Children calls on all parties to the conflict to back a three point pledge to protect Syria’s children.

Specifically, we call on all parties:

  1. To ensure aid reaches all children who are in need;
  2. Not to target schools and hospitals, and not to use these as military bases;
  3. Not to use explosive weapons (with wide area impact) in populated areas.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WESTPORT, Conn. (November 21, 2013) — The international aid organization Save the Children is urging mothers affected by Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines to keep breastfeeding their babies to prevent them from contracting illnesses such as diarrhea — which can be life-threatening, especially in an emergency — and to gain the full nutritional benefit of breast milk.

According to the United Nations Population Fund, 25,000 babies are expected to be born within the next month in the areas most affected by the typhoon.

"Breastfeeding is critical for newborn babies, especially following a disaster like Typhoon Haiyan, which has had a devastating impact on the Philippines," said Jesse Hartness, Save the Children's Advisor for Nutrition in Emergencies.

"Not only does it provide infants with a complete form of nutrition, but it reduces the risk of them contracting illnesses like diarrhea, which are common in the aftermath of disasters.

"Breastfeeding is the world's most powerful defense, when it comes to saving children's lives. It actually builds children's immune systems and strengthens their future protection against illnesses and malnutrition.

"There are a lot of myths about the benefits of baby formula, but nothing beats breast milk. Often water used to mix baby formula is contaminated following a disaster, and it's incredibly difficult to keep feeding bottles sterilized and safe for babies. And it doesn't have the same protective and nutritional value of breast milk.

"In emergencies, it is the youngest who are at the greatest risk of serious illness. In fact, non-breastfed infants are 50 times more likely to be hospitalized from diarrhea than breastfed babies."

In the Philippines, Save the Children is working to promote and protect breastfeeding practices in the heavily impacted areas around Tacloban on Leyte Island and the northeast of Panay Island, and to improve knowledge around feeding practices.

At the Pontevedra Health Unit on Panay Island, one of the worst hit parts of the Philippines, May-Joy, a mother of three, has taken her two-week-old daughter Ariana – born five days before the typhoon struck – for a routine blood test.

May-Joy believes strongly in the benefits of breast milk, especially following the typhoon, which destroyed her family home and much of the sugarcane crop her husband farms.

"I believe in the power of breastfeeding. It can save our children and has been used throughout my family," she says. "It is natural and much better than formula, which can be dangerous if not mixed properly. Plus, it's more difficult to access and costs money. I could spend that money on my children."

Save the Children is beginning to roll out nine mobile health clinics to support affected communities on Leyte and Panay islands as part of a comprehensive strategy to support breastfeeding mothers in this emergency. The first clinic will open in Palo today, with two more to begin operating in Leyte next week. Six clinics are planned for Panay Island.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (Nov. 19, 2013) — An estimated 4.6 million children have been affected by Typhoon Haiyan, with many witnessing the devastation first hand as their homes were swept away by the typhoon. Many children remain out of school, unattended to and potentially vulnerable to abuse and exploitation.

As millions of families still urgently need essentials such as food, water, and shelter, the psychological needs of the children who survived must also be given priority. Save the Children, in partnership with UNICEF and local communities, will open 11 child-friendly spaces on Leyte to address children's psychological and social needs and to help ensure their welfare. Additional centers are scheduled to open in the coming days on the island of Panay. Teams of local staff and volunteers will receive specialized training in responding to children's needs, and will provide informal education and activities within a safe and structured environment.

The first of the centers is scheduled to open on Leyte Wednesday. Field visits to remote areas also brought home the vulnerability of children in harder-to-reach areas.

"When we travelled south to Dulag today, I was struck by the hundreds of children who are still begging by the roadside" said David Bloomer, Save the Children's Child Protection Regional Advisor. "These villages are in ruins, with children sitting around in what remains with nothing to do and no structure to their day."

Local communities are highlighting the need to re-establish safe spaces for their children. "There is an urgent need to help children recover from this tragic experience. Communities have expressed how extremely anxious they are about their children's well-being," said Bloomer. "Children react to crises in very different ways, and the support they receive in the aftermath of a crisis is crucial to determining how resilient they can be in the longer-term. Evidence suggests that the faster children get back into school and back into normal and regular activities, the faster they will be able to recover."

The centers will allow parents time to focus on re-establishing their homes and livelihoods, while ensuring that the longer-term and more specialized needs of children who survived the typhoon are addressed.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WESTPORT, Conn.(November 16, 2013) — The relief effort is well under way in the Philippines as aid is starting to reach those in most need and more is on the way.

Loading a Ferry with supplies after Typhoon Haiyan

Supplies being loaded onto a ferry that is due to arrive in Tacloban.

    ·
  • On Saturday 16th November Save the Children distributed blankets, family hygiene kits, and household kits to 280 families living in incredibly close quarters in a former school in Tacloban.
  • ·
  • There are seven families crammed into every classroom, with children sleeping on desks, and without any access to electricity or running water. The risk of disease in such conditions is incredibly high and so vital hygiene kits were distributed and Save the Children volunteers delivered important health advice.
  • ·
  • On Sunday 17th November a barge carrying more than 25 tons of aid items and essential household kits will arrive in the afternoon
  • ·
  • On Sunday 17th November a DFID flight carrying over 95 tonnes of aid including water and sanitation equipment, including 20 tonnes of vital supplies of medicine and newborn kits for Save the Children, is scheduled to depart from the East Midlands early in the morning.
  • ·
  • On Monday 18th November a British Airways relief flight carrying vital aid including equipment for Save the Children to provide over 310,000 litres of safe drinking water will depart from London Stansted heading straight for Cebu in the Philippines.

Save the Children is also in the process of setting up 6 mobile health clinics in Tacloban, which will become operational w/c 18th November.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153 (M)

Save the Children aid flight being off loaded in Cebu, Philippines and heading for areas hardest hit by Typhoon Haiyan. Photo by Save the Children.
Save the Children aid flight being off loaded in Cebu, Philippines and heading for areas hardest hit by Typhoon Haiyan. Photo by Save the Children.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Nov. 15, 2013) — On Saturday, Save the Children will distribute desperately-needed supplies to families in Tacloban, one of the worst-affected areas in the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan.

Three trucks carrying household and family hygiene kits set off in convoy from Manila to reach Tacloban, and will benefit 5,000 people. Additional fuel, which has been in very short supply in the area, will also arrive and enable further distributions to take place over the coming days.

"Typhoon Haiyan overturned millions of lives when it hit the Philippines last Friday, causing destruction on a record-breaking scale, and shattering people's homes and livelihoods," said Save the Children's Humanitarian Relief Coordinator Michel Rooijackers. "The conditions in which families are living in right now are extremely difficult, and these items will provide some basic but essential relief."


Dada, 3, sits and waits with his family at Tacloban airport along with hundreds of other families who are trying to escape the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. Dada sustained a head injury during the deadly storm. Photo by Jonathan Hyams/Save the Children.
Dada, 3, sits and waits with his family at Tacloban airport along with hundreds of other families who are trying to escape the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. Dada sustained a head injury during the deadly storm. Photo by Jonathan Hyams/Save the Children.

Further distributions of this kind are planned over the coming days in Tacloban and in other hard-hit areas.

Save the Children staff were in Tacloban before the storm struck, and during the early hours of Nov. 8, assessed the needs of the most vulnerable people in the area. Many people have now taken refuge in makeshift evacuation centers. Careful assessments are carried out to ensure this help reaches vulnerable families in some of the city's worst-affected communities.

For many, it will mean they can finally leave the evacuation centers and start to rebuild their lives.

To help donate to Save the Children's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts, click here.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



"All children deserve the chance to succeed, but right now millions don't get one" says the passionate advocate and mom

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

Save the Children Artist Ambassador Jennifer Garner visits with school children who are participants of a Save the Children reading program at LBJ Elementary School in Kentucky. Photo by David Stephenson
Artist Ambassador Jennifer Garner shares a book with a mother and child who participate in Save the Children's early childhood education program at LBJ Elementary School in Kentucky. Photo by David Stephenson

WASHINGTON, DC. (Nov. 13, 2013) — Drawing on her experience advocating for early education programs across the country, Save the Children Artist Ambassador Jennifer Garner helped launch bipartisan legislation on Capitol Hill Wednesday that would dramatically expand early learning opportunities in America.

"As moms, we all want our children to do the very best they can, in school and in life. But, early education opportunities are out of reach for so many families in this country. As a result, children enter school already behind and at risk of never catching up," said Garner.

"All children deserve the chance to succeed, but right now millions don't get one," she said. "With this legislation, we have an historic opportunity to give the nearly 1 in 4 children living in poverty a chance at a brighter future."

As a Save the Children artist ambassador since 2009, Garner has traveled the country visiting the organization's early education programs in impoverished rural communities. The award-winning actress, mother of three and daughter of a retired West Virginia teacher came to Washington to help announce the introduction of the "Strong Start for America's Children Act."

The bill would build upon President Obama's early education proposal announced in his February State of the Union address by helping states fund preschool for all 4-year-olds of low-income families and by expanding additional early learning opportunities from birth to age 5.

Garner joined Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and the bill's cosponsors, Tom Harkin (D-IA), Rep. George Miller (D-CA), Rep. Richard Hanna (R-NY), to unveil the legislation alongside preschool children, parents, educators, and members of the law enforcement, military, and business communities.

Currently, two out of five American children don't attend preschool before starting Kindergarten. Low-income children are the most likely to fall behind before school starts, with research showing they can lag more affluent peers by 18 months by age 4. A new Stanford University study shows the developmental gap can already be six months by the time a child turns 2.

Preschool and earlier interventions, such as voluntary home visiting programs for the most vulnerable children, level the playing field by helping children of all backgrounds enter school ready to succeed, said Save the Children.

"Once kids fall behind it gets more and more expensive to get them back on track as they get older," said Save the Children Senior Vice President Mark Shriver, who also attended Wednesday's event.

"Why wait until they fall behind in the first place? If we care about our children's future and our nation's economic prospects, there's really no better investment than early education," he said. "Save the Children strongly endorses the Strong Start for America's Children Act."

Earlier this month, Shriver and Sec. Duncan visited a family in Save the Children's Early Steps to School Success program in Eastern Kentucky, and then joined an early learning town hall attended by local and state leaders of both parties.

Learn more at www.savethechildren.org/early.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WESTPORT, Conn. (November 13, 2013) — Save the Children is emptying warehouses of aid from three continents to send to the Philippines to deliver help on the ground to children and their families following the devastation caused by Typhoon Haiyan.

Technical and medical experts have scrambled from around the world to deliver aid arriving by plane to support people across the country, including:

  • More than 100 staff already on the ground in the hardest hit areas;
  • A team of 12 doctors coordinated by Save the Children arriving to offer immediate treatment of the injured and sick;
  • Nine senior logistics experts – from Britain, Australia, and Denmark – making sure help gets through to the people who need it most; and
  • Teams assessing need in Llolio-llolio, Rohas, Tacloban, and two sites on the island of Cebu.

More planes are planned for the coming days which will see aid delivered from warehouses in Europe, Africa and Asia.

Medical support is desperately needed as the full extent of the devastation is realized.

Cat Carter, Save the Children spokesperson speaking from Tacloban, said: "We are talking to doctors in Tacloban who are completely running out of medicine and supplies, finding conditions impossible and unable to do their job. They are desperate to treat children with injuries sustained during the storm and are now seeing young patients coming to them showing symptoms of flu and diarrhea and suffering from fevers.

"The lack of shelter, lack of food and bottled water is only making things worse as children suffer under such brutal conditions.

"There are still dead bodies and carcases of animals also litter the ground. There are major concerns that these could be a health hazard which will heap further pressure on doctors and medical teams.

"We have a strong teams on the ground which are doing all they can in extremely difficult conditions. Aid is on the way and will be distributed as soon as possible."

When our medical teams arrive they will give priority to open wounds, and obstetrics and pediatric care to pregnant mothers, babies and children.

Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles said, "Aid is on its way and we have experts on the ground in the places hit hard by the typhoon to make sure it is delivered to children and families as quickly and safely as possible."

A Save the Children aid plane will arrive in Cebu Thursday.

Supplies and aid on board include:

  • 2,000 sheets of tarpaulin & 7,380 pieces of plastic sheeting
  • 12,000 blankets
  • 4 mobile clinics with all the necessary medical equipment
  • 13,600 Jerry Cans
  • 2,500 Kitchen Sets
  • 500 New Born Kits
  • 100 'Winterized Tents'
  • 5,000 buckets

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WESTPORT, Conn. (Nov. 11, 2013) — Under very difficult conditions, Save the Children has set up operations to provide urgent support to children and their families following the destruction of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines.

The aid agency now has operational bases in Tacloban City and Ormac City on Leyte Island, one of the worst affected areas.

Save the Children Philippine's Deputy Director Ned Olney said staff faced multiple challenges in providing support to communities.

"Our teams on the ground are experiencing very difficult conditions. There is considerable debris on the roads, very few operational vehicles and the airports are closed," Olney said.

"We're currently purchasing pick-up trucks so we can move supplies around and are looking at how we can fly in extra emergency relief items.

"There are also a lot of decomposing bodies in the street and our staff are finding it hard to access clean water and food."

Olney said security was another concern.

"Our teams have seen looting in Tacloban. People are just so desperate to survive right now," he said.

"We are working hard to ensure the emergency relief supplies we bring in are cared for and distributed in an orderly manner in coordination with the communities and local police." To help donate to Save the Children's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts, visit SaveTheChildren.org

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WESTPORT, Conn. (November 10, 2013) — Communities in Vietnam are bracing themselves as Super Typhoon Haiyan heads their way after causing devastation in the Philippines, with an estimated 10,000 people feared killed.

Save the Children Vietnam's Deputy Director Doan Anh Tuan said the most recent reports show the superstorm has slowed as it makes landfall today.

"The good news is the Typhoon has slightly weakened," Tuan Doan said. "But the bad news is the storm has changed direction and is now headed for the north central region of Vietnam where communities are not as prepared as communities in the central region."

"Given the devastation in the Philippines, we are very concerned about children and the elderly people in north central regions who have not been evacuated and who are not prepared for the storm.

"We predict that lots of houses will be damaged by the strong winds and flooding from the rain and storm surges. The rain is getting heavier now and I predict the wind will pick up soon as the storm approaches."

Typhoons at this time of year normally hit the southern and central regions of Vietnam, where communities are prepared. Last year, a typhoon also changed direction at the last minute and hit unprepared communities in the northern Vietnam.

Save the Children has an emergency response team ready to assist communities affected by the superstorm. It has warehouses in Hanoi and Da Nang stocked with 6,000 household, hygiene, and education kits ready for distribution today.

Local governments have spent the past week evacuating more than 800,000 people in the central provinces. Since the storm's last minute change in direction, only some people have been evacuated from the north central and Red River delta regions.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WASHINGTON, D.C.(November 9, 2013) — After pummeling the Philippines on Friday, Typhoon Haiyan is expected to pack winds of up to 125 miles per hour as it makes landfall in Vietnam tomorrow morning local time.

One million people could be affected, including 330,000 children.

"We’re preparing for dangerous winds, flash flooding and significant damage to infrastructure. We’re especially concerned about the thousands of children and their families who live in low-lying areas or in homes that might not be able to withstand the full force of Typhoon Haiyan,” said Tuan Doan, Save the Children’s Deputy Country Director in Vietnam.

Save the Children has been working with communities to prepare for natural disasters like this one, and our teams are on alert, ready and waiting to respond.

The typhoon is expected to make landfall across central Vietnam between 4am and 10am Sunday local time, including provinces that were severely hit by the Wutip and Nari Typhoons last month.

Save the Children’s Emergency Response Team is on standby, and will move to the worst affected areas once the storm has passed to assess what help is needed.

Save the Children has about 2,000 household kits, 1,000 hygiene kits and more than 3,000 education kits ready for distribution should the need arise.

In the Philippines, up to 7,000 schools could have been damaged by super storm Haiyan in the Philippines, according to Save the Children, which is working to reach the hardest hit areas like the city of Tacloban.

"We are very concerned for the poorest and most vulnerable children in some of the hardest hit places like Tacloban where there is likely to be catastrophic damage, especially to the homes of the poorest people who live in buildings made from flimsy materials,” said Save the Children’s Country Director Anna Lindenfors.

"While the immediate focus must be on saving lives, we are also extremely worried that thousands of schools will have been knocked out of action or badly affected by the typhoon. In the worst hit areas this will have a terrible impact on children's education and it will be important that we help them back to school as quickly as possible."

Save the Children has been working in the Philippines since 1981, responding to dozens of emergencies across the country. The aid agency mounted large-scale emergency responses to Typhoon Washi in 2011, as well as Typhoon Bopha and the Manila floods last year.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Aid Workers Deployed to Meet Needs of Children and Their Families

Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WASHINGTON, D.C. (November 7, 2013) — A super typhoon packing winds of up to 155 miles per hour and presently headed for densely populated parts of the Philippines is a threat to life and property, warns Save the Children.

With a history of responding to emergencies in the Philippines, Save the Children has already deployed a rapid response team to meet the needs of children in the city of Tacloban, where the super typhoon is expected to hit hardest.

"Typhoons bring with it strong winds and heavy rain, which can cause flash flooding and extensive damage to infrastructure. Thousands of children and their families could be made homeless as houses are damaged or destroyed," said Save the Children's Lynette Lim, who joins the rapid response team in Tacloban today.

"We're especially concerned about children as they are smaller and more easily swept away in floods, killed by collapsing buildings or hit with flying debris. As the storm is expected to take place during the day but then move across the country during the night, their parents may be out at work so children may not know where to go or what to do."

The super typhoon is expected to make landfall off the coast of Eastern Visayas on Friday as a category five storm packing winds of up to 155 miles per hour along with extremely heavy rainfall and a dangerous storm surge. Category five is the strongest possible typhoon.

Ten million people are estimated to be in the path of path of Typhoon Haiyan. Save the Children has pre-positioned relief material kits for children and families, which will include toiletries, household cleaning items, temporary school tents and learning materials.

The last category five storm to hit the Philippines was Typhoon Bopha, which caused widespread devastation, uprooting trees, destroying thousands of homes and killing at least 1,000 people.

Save the Children has been working in the Philippines since 1981, responding to dozens of emergencies across the country. Save the Children mounted large-scale emergency responses to Typhoon Washi in 2011, Typhoon Bopha and Manila floods last year and most recently to Typhoon Utor in September which pummelled Luzon, ripping roofs off houses and affecting nearly 400,000 people.

 

How You Can Help Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan

Please donate to the Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund to support Save the Children's responses to urgent needs as a result of Typhoon Haiyan and other fierce storms in the Philippines. Donate now

 

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Since 2003, Program has Impacted 10 Million Children and Raised $74 Million

Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171

WESTPORT, Conn. (Nov. 6, 2013) — Save the Children and UNICEF announced today the return of IKEA's annual Soft Toys for Education campaign, which will run from Nov. 10, 2013 to Jan. 4, 2014. For every IKEA soft toy or children's book sold during this period, the IKEA Foundation will donate one euro (approximately $1.34) to UNICEF and Save the Children to give children in developing countries access to a quality education. Launched in 2003, the campaign has impacted 10 million children in 46 countries and donations have totalled $74 million for 90 projects.

Education is the most powerful and effective way to help children escape poverty. The change it can bring to a young life is immense. Education has a direct impact on well-being, from better health to increased opportunities. It gives children knowledge, skills and confidence they need to shape a better future for themselves. When a child begins and stays in school, he or she not only changes the course of their own life, but that of future generations. And that's when small changes pave the way for bigger ones.

The donations from the IKEA Soft Toys for Education Campaign will help train teachers in child-friendly teaching methods, improve child protection systems, supply educational materials like pencils, books, bags, rebuild schools and provide better water and toilet facilities; and increase school attendance rates. More than 10 million children will be educated in eliminating discrimination and stigma.

This year's newcomers to the soft toys family are fairy tale heroes:

  • LUFSIG, the soft toy wolf
  • NOJSIG and GULLGOSSE, a princess and a king
  • KRULLIG, an elf
  • SÅNGTRAST, a fairy with a magic spell

Inspiration to read opens the door to education, which is why, every year, IKEA creates a children's book based on IKEA soft toy characters as part of the annual Soft Toys for Education Campaign. In this year's book, "The Princess and the Happiness," young readers visit the fairy-tale forest and learn that happiness can be just around the corner.

Supporting Education — Together

"Thanks to the unwavering commitment shown by IKEA co-workers and customers, the IKEA Foundation has donated more than $51 million to UNICEF's education programs for children in Africa and Asia," said Caryl Stern, president and CEO of the U.S. Fund for UNICEF. "IKEA's support has enabled UNICEF to get millions of children into the classroom, provide teacher training to improve the quality of education, and help ensure children complete school."

"We are looking forward to our continued holiday tradition of teaming with IKEA Soft Toys for Education. The enthusiasm of IKEA staff and customers brings desperately needed education and teacher training to children in underserved parts of the world and will impact future generations," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "We are honored to be part of this partnership along with UNICEF, and look forward to creating lasting change for children."

"We are incredibly proud to be part of the IKEA Soft Toy for Education campaign. The funding means we can continue our work on changing the lives of children with disabilities and children of minority groups, the most marginalized children, in Eastern Europe and South East Asia. We're providing access to quality education for millions of children, impacting on generations to come." Elisabeth Dahlin, secretary general, Save the Children Sweden, and chairperson Global Lead Agency for the IKEA Foundation Collaboration

"IKEA's soft toys bring smiles to the faces of thousands of children. But many children across the globe have few reasons to smile. They don't have access to basic things most of us take for granted — like clean water, food or education. IKEA's annual Soft Toys for Education campaign makes a real difference — helping thousands of new children every year get an opportunity to receive a quality education," Per Heggenes, CEO IKEA Foundation.

Good Things are Happening All Over

A small contribution can make a big difference. Here are some examples of how the IKEA Foundation donations have impacted children's lives:

Ethiopia: Education is a primary driver for Ethiopia's development. In 2012, UNICEF's Schools for Africa initiative helped 238,000 children – including 25,000 refugees -- stay in school despite living in challenging conditions.

Madagascar: In Madagascar UNICEF distributed more than 57,500 school kits in 114 of the most vulnerable districts, as part of its 'child-friendly schools' program.

Albania: Save the Children – with the support from the Soft Toys for Education campaign in 2010 – helped to ensure that 33,150 children were enrolled in 60 schools around the country in 2012.

Burkina Faso: The Soft Toys for Education campaign helped UNICEF and partners to increase the primary school enrollment rate in Burkina Faso to nearly 80% in 2012, already surpassing the 2015 targets.

Bangladesh: Save the Children has been working with local NGOs since 2010 to improve the lives of children from the indigenous groups in the Chittagong Hill tracts. To date, the project has directly reached more than 25,000 children and 14,500 adults.

About the IKEA Foundation
The IKEA Foundation aims to improve the opportunities for children and youth by funding holistic, long-term programs that can create substantial, lasting change, and enable them to take charge of their own future. We work with strong strategic partners applying innovative approaches to achieve large-scale results in four fundamental areas of a child's life. Currently funded programs benefit an estimated 100 million children. Learn more at www.ikeafoundation.org

About IKEA US
IKEA, the world's largest home furnishings retailer, was founded in 1943 in Sweden. Since that time, IKEA has offered home furnishings of good design, quality and function at low prices so the majority of people can afford them. There are currently more than 340 IKEA stores in 41 countries, including 38 in the U.S. IKEA incorporates sustainability into day-to-day business and supports initiatives that benefit children and the environment. For more information, see www.facebook.com/ikeausa, www.twitter.com/designbyikea, www.youtube.com/ikeausa, www.pinterest.com/ikeausa.

About UNICEF
The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) works in more than 190 countries and territories to save and improve children's lives, providing health care and immunizations, clean water and sanitation, nutrition, education, emergency relief and more. The U.S. Fund for UNICEF supports UNICEF's work through fundraising, advocacy, and education in the United States. Together, we are working toward the day when zero children die from preventable causes and every child has a safe and healthy childhood. ** One euro (approximately $1.34) is split and donated to UNICEF and Save the Children from the sale of each soft toy.

About Save the Children
Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WESTPORT, Conn. (Oct. 29, 2013) — 'Vaccination ceasefires' are needed in Syria to prevent the current polio outbreak turning into an epidemic which threatens children across the Middle East region, Save the Children warned today.

The call from the aid agency came as the World Health Organization and the Syrian government confirmed an outbreak of polio in the eastern province of Syria, the first time the highly contagious disease has been seen in the country for 14 years.

Half a million children under the age of 5 in Syria are at risk of contracting the disease, which is incurable and can result in lifelong paralysis as well as death.

The movement of Syrians to take refuge in neighboring countries means that there is a high risk the virus could spread across the region.

'Vaccination ceasefires' would mean pauses in fighting to allow vaccination campaigns to take place across both sides of the conflict. These ceasefires, also known as days of tranquility, have previously been carried out successfully in Afghanistan, Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The World Health Organization is currently drawing up plans to carry out vaccination campaigns, but Save the Children is concerned that these may not reach all areas of Syria. The international children's charity says it is key that the WHO-coordinated response covers the entirety of Syria, including where necessary, across borders from neighboring countries.

Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles said: "Polio doesn't respect conflict lines or borders, so we need these ceasefires to reach all children with vaccines, no matter where they live. If chemical weapons inspectors can be allowed access across Syria with notebooks, surely aid workers can be allowed in with vaccines.

"The fact that an outbreak of polio has now been confirmed in Syria is another sign of the desperate and spiraling humanitarian situation there. The UN Security Council recently agreed on access for humanitarian relief across Syria. This polio crisis is a clear test of whether all sides of the conflict will respect the Security Council's presidential statement and allow unhindered humanitarian aid."

Save the Children has vaccinated 21,000 children against polio in Syria but wants to reach many more. They are also delivering life-saving aid to thousands across Syria and are helping hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing the war in countries throughout the region.

To learn more about Save the Children's aid efforts surrounding Syrian refugees, or to donate, visit SavetheChildren.org/syria.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Save the Children Urges Stronger Disaster Protections for Kids

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

Hurricane Sandy One Year Progress Report
Hurricane Sandy One Year Progress Report.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Oct. 23, 2013) — One year after Hurricane Sandy upended their lives, many children are still struggling with intense fears and stress brought on by the devastating storm and its aftermath, Save the Children said.

"Sandy was the most terrifying experience in the lives of thousands of children. But the day the storm struck was only the beginning of the upheaval and turmoil many children have experienced since," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children's President & CEO.

"Children are still having nightmares and panicking when they hear the word storm. Others are depressed, acting out at school, or even causing themselves bodily harm as they struggle to cope," she said.


Hurricane Sandy One Year Later
After Sandy destroyed their Brooklyn apartment and all their belongings, Maria and her family slept on other people’s floors for months. Rachel, 3, cried most nights and refused to drink milk without her favorite Dora the Explorer cup. Returning to child care has helped her recover. See Hurricane Sandy’s impact on children and what they need to recover.

As the nation's leading child-focused emergency response organization, Save the Children has helped 500,000 children affected by U.S. disasters since Hurricane Katrina, including 40,000 children affected by Hurricane Sandy. The nonprofit's Westport, Conn. headquarters were seriously damaged by the storm.

"Sandy has underscored what we already know — that children are the most vulnerable when disaster strikes. And yet, our nation continues to under-invest in protecting our kids," Miles said.

Save the Children said mental health services are largely under-resourced or unequipped to meet the unique needs that large numbers of children are facing after Sandy. Additionally, hundreds of damaged child care centers across New York and New Jersey have struggled to rebuild and reopen just when children and their families need them most, the agency said. Most child care centers don't qualify for federal recovery funding.

Save the Children is working to address gaps in both these areas, but said children's needs remain great.

Putting children at even greater risk, the organization warned, investments are remarkably low in measures to protect children before disaster strikes. States have spent less than one tenth of 1 percent of federal disaster preparedness grants on children's needs in recent years, Save the Children said.

Policies to protect children are also woefully inadequate. Save the Children's recently released 2013 disaster report card reveals that most states still fail to meet four basic standards to protect children from disaster in schools and child care. New Jersey is one of only four states that took action this year to meet all four standards.

"Let's hope it doesn't take a disaster like Sandy to wake up the 28 states that still fail to adequately protect children," Miles said.

Save the Children is calling on Americans to take action to protect children – by preparing their own families and by supporting improved policies. Downloadable family and caregiver emergency checklists are available through the organization's Get Ready. Get Safe. initiative. Visitors can also find their state's disaster report card results with an option to write their governor and a video showing Sandy's impact on children.

Visit www.savethechildren.org/GetReady.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Support for Senate Food Aid Reforms Strong

Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

WESTPORT, Conn. (Oct. 22, 2013) — As members from of both houses of Congress prepare to negotiate a final version of the U.S. farm bill, a bipartisan group of more than 50 members of the U.S. House of Representatives sent a letter to the chairs and ranking members of the House and Senate Agriculture Committees expressing strong support for reforms in the Senate version of the bill. The letter urged the conference committee to modernize U.S. international food aid programs by including broadly supported reforms that passed the Senate earlier this year.

Download the letter

The members' letter strongly supports the goals of U.S. international food assistance programs saying they, "play a vital role in preventing famines, reversing acute and chronic child malnutrition, assisting those uprooted by conflict or natural disaster, and enabling vulnerable populations to build resilience against future food price shocks." Achieving these goals requires that, "in a time of constrained budgets and increasing needs, more must be done to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of our food aid system."

Efforts to modernize food aid have been proposed by both parties over the years, including by the Bush and Obama administrations. The letter reveals that there is a strong base of support in the House for the Senate-passed reforms that would increase the amount of food allowed to be purchased closer to where it's needed and reduce reliance on the inefficient practice of monetization, or shipping and selling commodities overseas to fund food security programs.

In response to the letter, a coalition of leading humanitarian and relief organizations, including Save the Children, congratulated the letter's authors, Representative's Ander Crenshaw (R- FL) and Adam Smith (D-WA), for their leadership to gather support for the Senate proposals:

"Reforming our food aid system could enable millions more people to be reached with lifesaving aid without costing taxpayers one extra penny. Representatives Smith and Crenshaw and the dozens of leaders in Congress who are standing up to fight for these common sense reforms deserve our thanks and our support."

Members of the coalition include American Jewish World Service, The Borgen Project, Bread for the World, CARE USA, Church World Service, InterAction, Mercy Corps, Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network, Oxfam America, Save the Children and World Food Program USA.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Read the report.

Media Contact
Phil Carroll 202.640.6823 (O), 202.215.0638 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (Oct. 23, 2013) — One of the world's poorest countries, Niger, ranks highest in a new report by Save the Children which evaluates countries' progress in tackling preventable child deaths in an equitable and sustainable way.

While Niger's under-five child mortality rate remains high in comparison to many other countries, Niger is on track to achieve the fourth UN Millennium Development Goal (MDG 4) to reduce preven'table under-five mortality rates by two-thirds in 2015. But what sets Niger apart from other countries that have reduced their under-five mortality rate by two-thirds is Niger is meeting a critical "triple bottom line"-reducing child mortality and doing it in an equitable and sustainable way. This means that Niger's progress has benefited children across all income groups, boys and girls equally, and in rural areas, as well as urban slums. Moreover, Niger's success has happened in spite of scarce resources and recurring droughts.

In contrast, Save the Children's "Lives on the Line" report reveals that other countries that have made dramatic gains in child health — like Bangladesh and Cambodia — risk seeing this progress stall unless they increase equitable coverage of key health services that save lives. (Download full report or download executive summary)

The report also highlights that progress in reducing malnutrition, an underlying cause of 45 percent of child deaths, and newborn deaths, which account for 44 percent of all under-five child deaths, remain sluggish –critical factors in efforts to further reduce child deaths.

Save the Children's President and CEO Carolyn Miles said: "We just can't get there without addressing newborns, malnutrition and completing the task of preventing and treating the most common causes of child death — pneumonia, diarrhea and malaria — especially in poor communities. Ending preventable child deaths is an achievable goal, but world leaders must put in place policies and programs that ensure that children of all backgrounds have an equal chance to survive. Niger's political commitment and investments in child health have paid off in progress to date, and have set the stage for further reductions in child mortality over the longer-term."

The report introduces a new approach to assessing efforts in 75 developing countries to reduce child deaths. For the first time, the findings show both how quickly progress is being made towards this UN goal, but also whether progress is equitable — across different social and economic groups — and sustainable, measured in terms of political will and stability.

Niger's success in reducing child mortality

Niger has seen impressive increases in immunization and bednet coverage, treatment of pneumonia, and exclusive breastfeeding — made possible in part due to access to free health care for pregnant women and children, nutrition programs and extension of basic health services to hard-to-reach populations. Collectively, these factors have contributed to rapid reduction in its under-five child mortality rate, from 326 deaths for every 1,000 live births in 1990, to 114 deaths per 1,000 in 2012 across the board — a remarkable 65 percent reduction.

In some regions, even as they are making progress overall, inequality is getting worse. In sub-Saharan Africa — an area with half of all child deaths — the gaps between rich and poor children widened between 1998 and 2008. The report also shows that disparities in child mortality with girls experiencing higher rates of mortality than boys are worsening across regions by an average of one percentage point annually.

Evidence suggests that four million additional lives could have been saved over a 10-year period in 40 high-burden countries, if progress had been equal in all income groups.

Save the Children is calling upon national leaders to:

  • Scale up high-impact interventions, such as immunization, treatment of childhood pneumonia, diarrhea and malaria, and greater attention to newborn health and malnutrition
  • Implement national healthcare plans that reach every child, including newborns, with the objective of reaching full coverage by 2030
  • Launch campaign efforts to reduce malnutrition so that every child has the nutrition they need to survive and thrive
  • Increase public spending on health and target high-impact services and practices, and on "reaching the unreached" – those populations most often missed by existing health services

Save the Children is calling on the U.S. government to:

  • Continue to provide global leadership and robust funding for addressing maternal, newborn and child health issues and nutrition
  • Fulfill commitments made to addressing nutrition at the Nutrition for Growth conference, including reducing stunting by 2 million by 2017
  • Increase efforts to ensure that a skilled health worker is within reach of every child, and announce concrete ways the U.S. plans to do this at the Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health in Brazil in November 2013

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Platinum-Selling Recording Artist Teams Up with Kids in Yucca Valley, California for Relay Race

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Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

Bridgit Mendler high-fives Chavelle Fowles, 10, a fifth grader at Onaga Elementary School, on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013 in Yucca Valley, Calif., as Mendler visits to support the children that are running cooperatively the length of a marathon in order to help other children survive and thrive. Photo by Jamie Rector.
Bridgit Mendler high-fives Chavelle Fowles, 10, a fifth grader at Onaga Elementary School, on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013 in Yucca Valley, Calif., as Mendler visits to support the children that are running cooperatively the length of a marathon in order to help other children survive and thrive. Photo by Jamie Rector.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Oct. 21, 2013) — On the high desert plains of Yucca Valley, California, actress and recording artist Bridgit Mendler and 67 elementary school students last week took on Save the Children's World Marathon Challenge.

The World Marathon Challenge is a relay race where teams of kids try to run a full marathon distance of 26.2 miles in less time than Wilson Kipsang's world marathon record of 2 hours, 3 minutes and 23 seconds. The worldwide race, to be held in 21 U.S. states this month, aims to raise awareness and funds for programs focused on child survival and well-being.

Addressing an enthusiastic crowd of youngsters outside the Onaga Elementary School in Yucca Valley before the start of the race on Oct. 16, Bridgit Mendler said, "I am really excited to be here today to kick off Save the Children's World Marathon Challenge for such a great cause. We have come together to have fun, and also to help kids in the U.S. and around the globe get a better and healthier start in life.”

Bridgit Mendler runs with Lexie Tran, a kindergardener at Onaga Elementary School, on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013 in Yucca Valley, Calif. Photo by Jamie Rector.
Bridgit Mendler runs with Lexie Tran, a kindergardener at Onaga Elementary School, on Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013 in Yucca Valley, Calif. Photo by Jamie Rector.

Mendler ran the first lap of the race and then cheered kids on as they passed the baton to their teammates and crossed the finish line. "Whether you break the world record or not, you are all champions. I am so proud of you,” said Mendler. Save the Children's World Marathon Challenge will take place in 67 countries, including the United States, throughout October. More than 50,000 kids, including 12,000 U.S. kids, signed up to participate in the race.

To learn more about the World Marathon Challenge and how you can help, go to WMC.SavetheChildren.org or follow #WMC2013

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Phil Carroll 202.215.0638

WESTPORT, Conn. (October 16, 2013) — Save the Children today launched a star-studded film featuring Isla Fisher, Disney actor Cameron Boyce, Bollywood megastar Kunal Kapoor and former marathon world record holder, Kenyan Patrick Makau, to promote its World Marathon Challenge for kids.

The World Marathon Challenge, a global relay race in which teams of kids come together to complete a full marathon, is taking place globally throughout the month of October, and involves more than 50,000 children in 67 countries. The relay race aims to raise awareness and funds for programs focused on child survival and well-being.

The short film has each of the stars running a leg of the race in different corners of the world. The film kicks off in Kenya with athlete Patrick Makau deftly gliding through the rural countryside. It then cuts to Bollywood's Kunal Kapoor as he charges past ruins on the outskirts of Mumbai, before passing the baton to the safe hands of Isla Fisher in the United States. Cameron Boyce ("Grown Ups," "Grown Ups 2") then takes center stage in Los Angeles, with baton-twirling breakdance moves his fans will love.

The action-packed film also features children, young acrobats, parkourists and free-runners from Los Angeles and around the world.

Isla Fisher said, "I recently visited Save the Children's work in Brazil, and there is nothing more important than making sure every child gets the health and nutrition they need. All children should be able to reach their potential."

Kunal Kapoor said, "This breath-taking film is energetic, exciting and fun. It is a celebration of the power, resilience and ingenuity of children and young people around the world. I have seen first-hand the work done by Save the Children, and ask people to back their global campaign to save children's lives."

Patrick Makau said: "Dramatic progress is being made around the world in saving children's lives from poverty and disease. Change is possible, and I encourage people to join Save the Children's campaign and be part of this movement. Growing up is hard enough. It shouldn't be a race for survival."

Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children, said: "Our global ambassadors have given their support to this critical issue. We want this energetic film to inspire people to take action all around the world. All children must be able to access life-saving care and be given the opportunity to thrive, no matter where they are born."

To view the film, go here. To find out how to take part in the World Marathon Challenge, go to WMC.savethechildren.org or use #WMC2013 on Twitter.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

MANILA — A 7.2 magnitude earthquake rocked the Bohol island of the Philippines on Tuesday. At a depth of 56km in a populated area, the risk for casualties and damage is expected to be high.

"Save the Children aid workers are closely monitoring the situation in Bohol and stand ready to respond to the needs of affected children and their families," said Save the Children Country Director Anna Lindenfors from Manila.

"We are especially concerned about young children as they are always vulnerable in emergency situations, and we are already hearing reports of children being quite scared and in shock. More aftershocks from the earthquake can be expected, so it is hard to know the full extent of damage at this stage."

"Our trained staff are on alert and will mount a response if needed. Our primary concern at this stage is the safety and wellbeing of the children affected."

Save the Children has been working in the Philippines since 1981 and has a long experience responding to emergencies in the Philippines. The aid agency mounted large-scale emergency responses to Typhoon Washi in 2011 and Typhoon Ketsana in 2009, and most recently to last year’s Typhoon Bopha and Manila floods.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
(In Orissa state, India) Devandra Tak, +91 9811168488 and on Twitter: @Devendratak

The first images taken of Cyclone Phailin by Save The Children staff on the ground in Puri, Orissa / Odisha, eastern India. Images show large waves and damage on the eastern coast of India caused by strong winds from the on coming cyclone. Credit: Valay Singh Rai/ Save The Children
Four-year-old Shiboo looks on next to fallen trees on a road in Bhuwaneshwar, Orissa, India as clean up efforts begin the morning after Cyclone Phailin hit. Photo credit: Prasanth Vishwanathan / Save The Children

WESTPORT, Conn. (Oct. 13, 2013) – Save the Children emergency response teams are working with the government and local partners to quickly assess the needs of children as Cyclone Phailin continues to hit Odishia and other parts of eastern India.

"The damage does not look as bad as we thought it could be: telephone poles have been pulled up from the ground, and trees uprooted, but buildings remain for the most part intact. Although it is still early, so it’s difficult to know the full extent of the damage," said Save the Children’s Devendra Tak, referring to the damage in Puri, one of the main areas affected by the cyclone.

"Looking out to the ocean, it’s clear the water is still quite rough. On the ground, people are starting to come out and there are children on the streets. The wind is still quite strong, although the rains have let up," said Tak.

Save the Children has pre-packed emergency supplies, including hygiene kits and food baskets, and is ready to distribute these items to families affected by the storm while the needs assessment is underway.

Additional heavy rain and strong winds are expected to pound cyclone-affected areas in the next 24 hours.

"The wind speed is very high, so we anticipate that there may be delays in being able to reach the most vulnerable families with aid. This also means it could take some time before the full extent of the damage is known, but our teams are working around the clock to coordinate a rapid response and meet the needs of those affected," added Tak.

Donate to the Cyclone Phailin Children in Emergency Fund or visit www.savethechildren.org/india for more information.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

(In Orissa state, India) Devandra Tak, +91 9811168488 and on Twitter: @Devendratak

The first images taken of Cyclone Phailin by Save The Children staff on the ground in Puri, Orissa / Odisha, eastern India. Images show large waves and damage on the eastern coast of India caused by strong winds from the on coming cyclone. Credit: Valay Singh Rai/ Save The Children
The first images taken of Cyclone Phailin by Save The Children staff on the ground in Puri, Orissa / Odisha, eastern India. Images show large waves and damage on the eastern coast of India caused by strong winds from the on coming cyclone. Credit: Valay Singh Rai/ Save The Children

WESTPORT, Conn. (Oct. 12, 2013) – As Cyclone Phailin began pounding the East Coast of India today, Save the Children is preparing to provide much-needed relief supplies, including water, food baskets and hygiene kits to children and families uprooted and affected by the storm.

Save the Children staff arrived in Orissa, one of the areas expected to be hit hard by the cyclone, earlier today. Devendra Tak, national manager of media and communications for Save the Children said, “Our plane took four attempts to land in Bhubaneswar, Orissa, on Saturday morning because conditions were so bad – and as soon as we disembarked they shut the airport. As we drove towards the coast we passed uprooted trees, damaged houses and towns like ghost towns as most people had been evacuated to cyclone shelters. When we got to the coast the waves were extremely high – the sea was like a cauldron of boiling water. It’s getting windier and the rain is increasing hour on hour. The cyclone is about to make landfall anytime now and we will begin to know the extent of its damage overnight.”

Donate to the Cyclone Phailin Children in Emergency Fund or visit www.savethechildren.org/india for more information.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Ajla Grozdanic 202.251.5859

Fifty Thousand Children in 60 Countries Take Part in Save the Children's Global Race

Ben, 9, heads toward the finish line  Photo Credit:
Ben, 9, heads toward the finish line Photo Credit: Suzanna Klaucke

WESTPORT, Conn. (Oct. 5, 2013) – Today marks the launch of Save the Children's World Marathon Challenge, a global relay in which teams of children from around the world will band together throughout the month of October to complete a full marathon distance of 26.2 miles. The events kicked off this Saturday in the United States when Save the Children supporters in Westport, Conn., where the organization is headquartered, raced one another to raise funds and awareness for programs focused on child survival and well-being.

"Every child in the United States and around the globe deserves the very best chance to live a bright future, but not every child gets this chance, the chance to survive and thrive," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "Achieving this vision is not a sprint, but a marathon – a world marathon."

Fifty-thousand kids in more than 60 countries around the world will take the World Marathon Challenge. In the United States alone, nearly 12,000 kids in schools and clubs in 21 states and the District of Columbia will lace up their sneakers and race to the finish line. Relay races will be held throughout this month worldwide, with the grand finale on Oct. 23, when hundreds of teams will run simultaneously.

The cheering squad. Photo Credit: Suzanna Klaucke
The cheering squad. Photo Credit: Suzanna Klaucke

"The World Marathon Challenge gives kids an opportunity to help other kids in the United States and globally, while also having fun," said Miles. "Whether kids run in the race, raise funds or raise their voice to help more children survive the first five years of life, they can be powerful advocates for other kids."

During the kick-off this Saturday, the Westport community raised more than $30,000 toward a combined U.S. fundraising goal of $100,000. The funds raised at each race will be used by Save the Children to provide child-focused interventions, ranging from offering newborn care advice to diagnosing and treating preventable diseases like diarrhea, pneumonia and malaria.

In addition to running in the race, students across America will be advocates for other kids by urging Congress to protect programs that help children in the United States and around the world survive and thrive. Kids can take action online or, at some relay race events, they can sign their name to a World Marathon Challenge-themed postcard or t-shirt, which Save the Children will present on behalf of their school to members of Congress.

To sponsor a school or club, go to WMC.savethechildren.org.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (Oct. 5, 2013) — As Tropical Storm Karen batters the Gulf Coast, bringing heavy rains and flooding, Save the Children’s emergency responders are ready to meet the needs of children and families affected by the storm.

Save the Children has led disaster preparedness and risk reduction programs throughout America in recent years, in order to minimize the devastating impact natural disasters can have on children. The organization has a history of emergency response work in the areas that could be hardest hit by this storm and has helped provide kid-friendly relief supplies and other essential support.

“Save the Children ensures that there are safe places for children in evacuation centers, because we know that in emergency situations like this they are most vulnerable,” said Jeanne-Aimée De Marrais, who has led Save the Children’s responses to Superstorm Sandy and the Oklahoma tornadoes. “We are ready to provide Child-Friendly Space programs and kits, and other critical support programs like child care recovery to help children deal with the aftermath of the storm.”

Save the Children is urging families in potentially affected areas to keep their children’s needs in mind when preparing for the storm. In addition to basic survival items such as water, a flashlight and a battery-powered radio, families with children need to include kid-friendly supplies in their emergency kits. Based upon Save the Children's years of domestic and international experience of coming to the aid of children in emergencies, these tips can be used as a guide for parents to support their loved ones in the event of a crisis. For more information on how to protect kids during emergencies, visit our Get Ready. Get Safe. website.

Save the Children Disaster Checklist for Families

  • Comfort Items: stuffed animal, doll, pacifier or blanket
  • Personal Hygiene: baby wipes, feminine products, diapers, nursing pads
  • Children’s Activities: books, puzzles, games
  • Infant Nutrition: nursing supplies, formula, pre-packaged baby food
  • Medical needs: infant/child fever reducer, rash ointment
  • Family meet-up: Pick a safe spot to meet if separated such as a local school or library
  • Out-of-towner: A family contact who would not be affected by a local disaster
  • ICE: Cell phones should have "ICE" (In Case of Emergency) programmed into their contacts
  • Text: Text messages can often get through, even when a phone call can’t
  • Contact school or day care: Ensure they know what your child is supposed to do in case of an emergency
  • Identification: Write down your child’s name and your contact information on a notecard and keep it with your child

Learn more about how you can help

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Actor Jennifer Garner and PVH's Chairman & CEO Emanuel "Manny" Chirico, among Other Honorees at Event Hosted by NBC's Jenna Bush Hager

Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.0718

Honorees at the early childhood education benefit gala hosted by Save the Children and Calvin Klein in New York City, from left: Tipton Elementary School's Early Childhood Coordinator, Virginia Almeida; PVH Corp.'s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Emanuel
Honorees at the early childhood education benefit gala hosted by Save the Children and Calvin Klein in New York City, from left: Tipton Elementary School's Early Childhood Coordinator, Virginia Almeida; PVH Corp.'s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Emanuel "Manny" Chirico; former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton; Jackie and Mike Bezos of the Bezos Family Foundation; and award-winning actor and Save the Children artist ambassador, Jennifer Garner. Photo by Neil Rasmus/BFAnyc.com

NEW YORK (Oct.2, 2013) — Save the Children and Calvin Klein, Inc. hosted a benefit gala in support of early childhood education last night at Cipriani 42nd Street in New York City. The event honored influential supporters of the organization, including former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton; award-winning actor and Save the Children artist ambassador Jennifer Garner; PVH Corp. chairman and Chief Executive Officer Emanuel "Manny" Chirico; the Bezos Family Foundation; and Tipton Elementary School's early childhood coordinator, Virginia Almeida. This monumental occasion has raised approximately $1.8 million thus far.

Hosted by NBC News correspondent and former first daughter Jenna Bush Hager, the inspiring event served to increase awareness for Save the Children and early childhood education programs in the U.S. The presenters for the evening, including Garner and Bush Hager, New York Giants' Victor Cruz, Victor Garber, Caroline Kennedy and Save the Children board member Anne M. Mulcahy, were all outfitted by the Calvin Klein Collection, as well as Save the Children's senior vice president for Strategic Initiatives, Mark Shriver. Other notable guests in attendance included Whoopi Goldberg and Save the Children's president and CEO, Carolyn Miles.

At the benefit gala, Save the Children bestowed five newly created awards: the National Legacy Award was presented to Clinton by Save the Children board members Thomas S. Murphy and Mulcahy; the National Child Advocate Award was presented to Garner by Garber; the National Responsibility Award was presented to Chirico by Cruz; the National Humanitarian Award was presented to Jackie Bezos by Jack Shonkoff, M.D., on behalf of the Bezos Family Foundation; and the National Child Service Award was presented to Almeida by Kennedy, for Almeida's work on Tipton Elementary School's Early Steps to School Success Program in Tipton, Calif.

Guests at the event enjoyed a special musical performance by multi-platinum and Grammy-nominated recording artist Daughtry. Additionally, a short film produced by Garner, which features a true story of a mother and child who have benefitted from the programs that Save the Children offers, was debuted.

About Calvin Klein, Inc.

Calvin Klein, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of PVH Corp. [NYSE: PVH], is one of the leading fashion design and marketing studios in the world. It designs and markets women's and men's designer collection apparel and a range of other products that are manufactured and marketed through an extensive network of licensing agreements and other arrangements worldwide. Product lines under the various Calvin Klein brands include women's dresses and suits, men's dress furnishings and tailored clothing, men's and women's sportswear and bridge and collection apparel, golf apparel, jeanswear, underwear, fragrances, eyewear, women's performance apparel, hosiery, socks, footwear, swimwear, jewelry, watches, outerwear, handbags, small leather goods, and home furnishings (including furniture). For more information, please visit calvinklein.com.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (October 2, 2013) — The United Nations Security Council agreement on access for humanitarian relief across Syria could save the lives of thousands of innocent children trapped by fighting and who have been denied access to aid, Save the Children said today.

The aid agency welcomed the UN Security Council presidential statement calling on all parties to strictly respect their obligation to facilitate "unhindered humanitarian access" — including through cross-border assistance — throughout Syria.

The charity called for detailed reporting back into the Security Council from teams on the ground on relief delivery to ensure the agreement translates to aid reaching more than seven million people inside Syria who desperately need it.

"We welcome the UN Security Council statement as an important first step but we know from past conflicts how easy it is for agreements to be made on paper but no action to be delivered on the ground," said Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles.

"The fight to save Syria's children is not yet won. The serious work begins now; following this agreement we need the international community to commit to a concrete delivery plan to provide millions inside Syria with food, medicine and shelter."

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Ajla Grozdanic 202.251.5859

WESTPORT, Conn. (Sept. 27, 2013) — In conjunction with this month's UN Global Compact Leaders Summit, Save the Children and the IKEA Foundation have announced that they have signed a $1.75 million (1.3 million euros) global humanitarian partnership agreement for 24-hour emergency response, focusing on the most vulnerable children affected by a humanitarian crisis.

Through this innovative program, the IKEA Foundation ensures a speedy 24-hour approval of humanitarian response funding to Save the Children at the very onset of an emergency. This enables rapid deployment of humanitarian experts to the field, whereby Save the Children can enhance and strengthen its capacity to respond when disaster strikes and will be able to save lives, alleviate suffering and restore dignity of affected children and their families, at a scope and scale appropriate to the need in emergencies around the world.

"There is always a challenge to find initial and flexible funding at the very onset of an emergency or when a complex humanitarian situation deteriorates," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children's president and CEO. "Save the Children's humanitarian partnership with the IKEA Foundation will increase capacity to respond to the needs of the most vulnerable children, not least in view of the ongoing crisis in Syria."

"This innovative funding approach means that Save the Children will be able to act within hours of a natural or manmade disaster, sending a team to ensure children's rights are protected just when they are most vulnerable after having been exposed to traumatizing events," explained Per Heggenes, CEO IKEA Foundation.

At the onset of an emergency, the IKEA Foundation guarantees a decision 24 hours after receiving a funding application from Save the Children, whereby Save the Children can immediately allocate the funds to the response.This will enable Save the Children to be fast, flexible and efficient at the very onset of an emergency, whilst simultaneously making the most effective use of the funding donated by the IKEA Foundation.

About the IKEA Foundation

The IKEA Foundation aims to improve opportunities for children and youth in the world's poorest communities by funding holistic, long-term programs that can create substantial, lasting change. The Foundation works with strong strategic partners applying innovative approaches to achieve large-scale results in four fundamental areas of a child's life: a place to call home; a healthy start in life; a quality education; and sustainable family income. Currently-funded programs benefit an estimated 100 million children by 2015. Learn more at www.ikeafoundation.org and www.facebook.com/IKEAFoundation

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Wendy Christian 203.465.8010 (M)

Read the report.
Getting to Zero, Save the Children's report on ending extreme poverty by 2030.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Sept. 25, 2013) — New research shows it is possible to end extreme poverty by 2030, but only if income inequality is tackled head on.

As world leaders gather at the UN to discuss poverty eradication, Save the Children's Getting to Zero report shows that in just 17 years it is possible to eradicate critical elements of extreme poverty, saving at least 1.8 million children's lives every year.

By analyzing country-level data through a new statistical model, Save the Children analysts found that by 2030 it is possible to ensure that no child dies of preventable causes, all children finish primary school, and everyone has access to safe water and sanitation. However, the data also shows that this is not possible under a "business as usual" scenario.

On current trajectories, by 2030, 1.8 million children will still die every year from preventable causes, nearly 400 million people will lack access to safe water, and a massive 1.4 billion will lack adequate sanitation — far short of the goal of getting to zero.

Only by factoring in reductions in income inequality and improvements in governance can we hit the 'zero targets' under discussion at the UN.

Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles said: "This is both a remarkable and sobering finding. We can now prove that this can be the generation that ends extreme poverty, but only if the world is willing to tackle income inequality head on.

"This is a key challenge to the current development model and requires a willingness to tackle the thorny subject of inequality, an issue too many politicians shy away from. We now know that even with high rates of growth, developing countries will only hit zero poverty if they reduce income inequality and improve governance at the same time.

"Save the Children urges leaders meeting in New York this week not to fall into the trap of willing the ends of poverty eradication without embracing the necessary means. Commitments to end poverty without accompanying pledges to tackle inequality will increasingly ring hollow."

Note to Editors

  • Preventable child deaths is defined as child mortality rates that fall below an upper threshold of 20/1000. Unfortunately, there will always be children who die of congenital health problems, but 20/1000 deaths is the internationally agreed level if children and parents had access to basic health care.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Global leaders convene in New York, call for immediate action to ensure education for all #EducationCannotWait

Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Ajla Grozdanic 202.251.5859

"I like school. We sit together and learn together," said Nilofar, 11, who attends a school for girls in Kabul, Afghanistan. Nilofar is lucky not to be among the 28 million children in conflict zones around the world who are denied the right to an education—more than half of whom are girls. Photo by Zubair Shairzay/Save the Children.

NEW YORK, (Sept. 23, 2013) — Global leaders from governments, international organizations and civil society today warned that more than 28 million children in countries affected by conflict are still being denied access to learning – and that they must not be made to wait any longer for an education. More than half of the world's 57 million primary-school-age children who are out of school live in countries scarred by war and conflict and are denied the right to an education, compared to 42 percent in 2008.

According to data from Save the Children, conflicts, fighting and displacement in countries such as Syria, the Central African Republic, Mali, and in the Democratic Republic of Congo have largely contributed to this increase.

Tens of thousands of schools have been attacked or are occupied by armed forces, heightening the risk that children caught up in these crises will never go to school or will drop out.

Today's Education Cannot Wait event, held for the second consecutive year during the United Nations General Assembly, was chaired by Gordon Brown, the United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education. It was convened in support of the Secretary-General's Global Education First Initiative, launched one year ago.

"We must make an intentional and deliberate turn from past policy responses to humanitarian crises where education has typically been underfunded," said Gordon Brown, United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education. "Today, with nearly one million Syrian refugee children, we have the opportunity to take immediate action and demonstrate that we can not only prioritize but deliver on the promise of education for all - education without borders - providing hope and opportunity even in the most dire circumstances."

Attacks against schools, students and teachers are a gross violation of human rights and international humanitarian law, amounting to war crimes. Yet, schools continue to be bombed, looted and occupied, used for political purposes and inhabited by displaced families.

"We're here today because education should never be a casualty of crisis…or a cost of conflict," said Anthony Lake, UNICEF Executive Director. "Education cannot wait for battles to end…or disasters to be averted… or funding to be available. Education cannot wait…because children cannot wait."

"Education in emergency situations is severely underfunded, accounting for merely 1.4 per cent of humanitarian aid," said Alice Albright, Chief Executive Officer of the Global Partnership for Education. "We should at least double this amount, make it more effective, and improve coordination among governments, donors and humanitarian agencies."

A Push to Plan, Prioritize and Protect

Quality education requires investment and planning to give children living in some of the toughest parts of the world hope and a chance to shape their futures.

Recognizing this, leaders at the Education Cannot Wait event made a united call for action including:

  • More planning for emergency prevention and integration of emergency preparedness and recovery in education sector plans and national budgets
  • Prioritizing education in emergencies by increasing humanitarian aid to education and improving the way it is delivered on the ground
  • Protection of children, teachers and education facilities from attacks

Education should not be interrupted as children who miss out on school are often unable to catch up and experience cumulative disadvantage throughout their lives.

"In emergency situations, parents and caregivers ask for education for their children; it's one of the first things they talk about. They know education's value," said Lori Heninger, Director of the International Network for Education in Emergencies. "If we are not providing education in emergencies, we are not being accountable to those people we are serving, those who have already lost so much."

"Education cannot and must not wait. We all have a duty to the children of the world to deliver good quality education regardless of the hostile conditions under which they live," said Tove Wang, Chief Executive Officer of Save the Children Norway.

The leaders agreed that education must play a central role in any post-2015 development plans.

"Education must be built into peace building – not bolted on – and it must be tied with longer-term development," said the Director-General of UNESCO, Irina Bokova. "This is essential in the push to 2015 and in the global agenda that follows."

The full list of participating organizations includes UNICEF, Save the Children, Global Partnership for Education, Office of the United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education, International Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE), Education Cluster, UNESCO, UNESCO-IIEP, Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack, UNHCR and Plan International.

Read a copy of the Call to Action.

Read Save the Children’s Attacks on Education report, which includes new research from UNESCO's Education for All Global Monitoring Report (EFAGMR).

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153 (M)

Syrian refugee children team up in the Domiz refugee camp, which is in the Kurdish part of Iraq. The living conditions in the camp are tough for the around 55,000 Syrian refugees who are staying there. Photo by Rob Holden.
Syrian refugee children team up in the Domiz refugee camp, which is in the Kurdish part of Iraq. The living conditions in the camp are tough for the around 55,000 Syrian refugees who are staying there. Photo by Rob Holden.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Sept. 23, 2013) — A lack of access to food, soaring prices and a collapse in food production has left the children of Syria at risk of malnutrition, Save the Children warned today.

The aid agency has gathered testimonies from refugees in neighboring countries, as well as residents trapped by fighting and enduring siege-like conditions, who detailed families' desperate struggle to feed their children.

Read the report: Hunger in a War Zone

More than four million Syrians — more than two million of them children — are unable to produce or buy enough food, with many thousands living under fire and with no access to all but the bare minimum foodstuffs needed to survive. Save the Children is already seeing reports that one in 20 children in rural Damascus is severely malnourished.

Save the Children has heard refugee accounts of children forced to subsist off nothing more than lentils or bread for days on end, with one family trapped in their basement by explosions eating just half a piece of bread each over the course of four days.

In a briefing on the state of hunger in Syria, released today, Save the Children also details how severe food shortages are being compounded by an explosion in food prices. The cost of even the most basic food items has spiralled out of control with the cost of the most basic supplies increasing 100 percent.

Among the testimonies Save the Children has gathered:

  • It was very dangerous for me and my children — we had no food and were always hungry. When this hunger had continued for two months and we were very weak, that is when we decided to flee. We realized we would starve if we stayed in Syria. – Roula, mother
  • The price of food doubled in my village and we couldn't afford to eat at all. Milk, bread, everything — doubled. The children became very hungry all the time. And with no nutrients, they also became sick. – Jinan, mother of Siba, 3
  • Because of a lack of food, my children didn't grow as they should. They started losing weight, and it was all we could do to keep them alive. – Maryam, mother of two

The war has shattered Syria's economy, and the United Nations now estimates close to seven million inhabitants have been plunged into poverty since fighting began. In addition, Syria's agriculture and infrastructure are collapsing, with grain production falling to less than half of what was typical before the war.

"The world has stood and watched as the children of Syria have been shot, shelled and traumatized by the horror of war. The conflict has already left thousands of children dead, and is now threatening their means of staying alive," said Roger Hearn, Save the Children's regional director for the Middle East.

"That some children are going to bed trapped amid fighting — terrified, alone, vulnerable — and with empty stomachs ought to be a stain on all our consciences.

"We understand there is a political debate over what to do next in Syria, but we believe everyone can agree on the critical need for safe humanitarian access across the entire country. There is no room for delay or argument: Syria's children must not be allowed to go hungry."

A lack of security makes gathering data on child malnutrition rates extremely difficult throughout Syria. However, all available evidence — including spiralling food costs, a collapse of infrastructure and food production, and testimonies of individuals' experiences with hunger — suggests Syria's children are facing a mounting struggle to feed themselves.

To donate to Save the Children's response to the Syria crisis or for more information, go to www.savethechildren.org/syria

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Second Annual Awards Program to Recognize Health Worker Honorees in the United States and Around the World

Media Contact
Phil Carroll 202.640.6823 (O) 202.215.0638 (M)

Watch Save the Children's Mary Beth Powers discuss the REAL awards on Good Morning America.

The 2013 REAL Award honorees. Save the Children photo.
The 2013 REAL Award honorees. Save the Children photo.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Sept. 23, 2013) — The day after honors were conferred to stars of the small screen, Save the Children and the Frontline Health Workers Coalition are launching the second annual REAL Awards, a unique global awards program designed to develop greater respect and appreciation for health workers and the lifesaving care they provide globally, as well as in the United States.

Starting today, the American public is encouraged to nominate an inspiring health worker in their own backyard from the following categories:

  • Nurse Practitioner
  • Nurse
  • Doctor
  • Hospice Worker
  • Midwife
  • Physician's Assistant
  • Community Health Worker
  • Pharmacist
  • Public Health Officer
  • General Health or Other

"Last night, many of us tuned in to see which of our favorite television personalities took home an Emmy," said Mary Beth Powers, campaign chief for Save the Children's Newborn and Child Survival Campaign. "While we appreciate the men and women who entertain and enlighten us, it's high time we recognize and celebrate the people who save our lives— health workers."

By some estimates, the world is short more than 5 million health workers, including 1 million frontline health workers. In the developing world, where well-equipped doctors and hospitals are scarce and distant for many people, frontline health workers are the first and often only point of contact to the health-care system for millions of people.

"Being part of the inaugural class of the REAL award recipients was a tremendous honor," said 2013 winner Dr. Beth DuPree, a breast cancer surgeon from Pennsylvania. "The common thread that we all possess is a passion for our individual purposes and a burning desire to make a difference with every breath we take."

The public can nominate a health worker in the United States at www.theREALawards.com until Oct. 25, 2013. Winners will be announced on Jan. 12, 2014, during a time when much of the American public is tuning in to traditional entertainment awards shows, such as the Golden Globes and the Academy Awards.

About The REAL Awards

The REAL Awards was created by Save the Children and the Frontline Health Workers Coalition, with the help of presenting sponsors Merck Company Foundation and Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation, and Competition in Healthcare. The REAL Awards is also supported by a number of national health-worker organizations, including the Association of Women's Health, Obstetrics and Neonatal Nurses (AWOHNN), American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM), American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), National Physician's Alliance (NPA), American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN), the Catholic Health Association of the USA (CHA), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

About Save the Children

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Organizations Work Together to Meet the Emotional Needs of Children Recovering from Disaster

Media Contacts
Sarita Fritzler (In Colorado) 203.253.8649
Eileen Burke, Save the Children 203.216.0718

Joshua is nothing but smiles while his grandpa paints his face during Family Fun Night at his shelter in Greely, Colorado on Sept. 21, 2013.  Photo Credit:  American Red Cross staff
Joshua is nothing but smiles while his grandpa paints his face during Family Fun Night at his shelter in Greely, Colorado on Sept. 21, 2013. Photo Credit: American Red Cross staff

Denver, Colo, (September 22, 2013) – The American Red Cross and national partner Save the Children have teamed up to help ease the trauma and impact of the recent floods on local children.

In the initial days following the Colorado floods, the Red Cross worked with Save the Children to provide the "Child-Friendly Spaces" program in evacuation shelters to make the shelters more welcoming for child evacuees and families. The program includes pre-packaged kits that contain equipment to mark off a special area for children, activity supplies (such as art materials, books, games and toys), and other materials to help ensure children’s safety and protection in shelters.

"Emergency shelters, while providing a safe haven from the elements, often place children in unfamiliar places, and typically they lack toys, safe places to play and structured activities for children," said Eric Jones, Assistant Director of Direct Services for the Red Cross disaster response to the Colorado floods. "Through this partnership, children in shelters are allowed to play, learn, socialize and express themselves under the supervision of a caring adult, giving them a sense of normalcy which can help them recover from the experience of weathering a disaster such as the recent floods."

These safe play areas allow children to play, socialize, and begin to recover from emotional distress and offer hundreds of children the chance to be kids again. The kid-friendly activities create a safe and supportive place for children to play with their peers and caring adults in the midst of the turmoil that surrounds them.

"The terrifying floods of the past week have been hard on adults, let alone the children. The stress of fleeing homes amid raging floodwaters can take a heavy toll on children’s emotional well-being," said Jeanne-Aimee De Marrais, Senior Director of U.S. Emergencies for Save the Children. "The structured play areas at the shelters allow kids to be kids again. Children can make new friends, play and begin to recover and heal after their lives were turned upside down."

Save the Children has operated the Child-Friendly Spaces program in five shelters and will be working with the Red Cross in upcoming days to provide additional support for kids affected by the flooding.

Additionally, Save the Children hosted a family fun night for shelter residents and Red Cross volunteers at the City of Greeley Recreation Center on Saturday evening, Sept. 21. Fifty children and their parents took part in a night of food, fun activities and entertainment. Local businesses donated face paints, bouncy castles, toys, a cotton candy machine and popcorn. Save the Children has worked with the families at the shelter for the past week, and the event was held to highlight the strong sense of community that has developed during that time.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

The American Red Cross provides disaster assistance free of charge and is supported by public donations. Donations can be made by calling 1-800-RED CROSS, visiting www.redcross.org, contacting your local Red Cross chapter, or texting the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. All donations are tax deductible.



Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, Actor Jennifer Garner, and PVH's Chairman & CEO Emanuel Chirico, Among Others to be Honored at Event Hosted by NBC's Jenna Bush Hager

Media Contacts
Wendy Christian 203.221.3767
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

Jennifer Garner and Mark Shriver read with a child participating in Save the Children's early education program in the actor's and Save the Children Artist Ambassador's home state of West Virginia.
Jennifer Garner and Mark Shriver read with a child participating in Save the Children's early education program in the actor's and Save the Children Artist Ambassador's home state of West Virginia.

NEW YORK CITY, N.Y. (Sept. 18, 2013) — Save the Children and Calvin Klein, Inc. will host a benefit gala on Tuesday, October 1st at Cipriani 42nd Street in New York City. The event will honor influential supporters of the organization, including Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton; award-winning actor and Save the Children Artist Ambassador, Jennifer Garner; PVH Corp.'s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Emanuel (Manny) Chirico; the Bezos Family Foundation; and, Tipton Elementary School's Early Childhood Coordinator, Virginia Almeida.

Hosted by NBC News Correspondent and former First Daughter, Jenna Bush Hager, the inspiring event will serve to increase awareness for Save the Children and early childhood education programs in the U.S. In honor of the occasion, Save the Children will bestow five newly created awards, including: National Legacy Award to Secretary Clinton; National Child Advocate Award to Ms. Garner; National Responsibility Award to Mr. Chirico; National Humanitarian Award to the Bezos Family Foundation, which will be accepted by Co-founder Jackie Bezos; and, the National Child Service Award to Ms. Almeida for her work on Tipton Elementary School's "Early Steps to School Success Program" in Tipton, California.

Guests at the event will enjoy a special musical performance by Multi-Platinum and Grammy-nominated recording artist, Daughtry. Additionally, debuting that night will be a short film produced by Ms. Garner, which features a true story of a mother and child who have benefitted from the programs that Save the Children offers.

"Our philanthropic mission is championing causes that advocate women and children, so we are thrilled to be furthering our long-standing relationship with Save the Children," said Mr. Chirico. "Over the past eight years, our organization and associates have raised over $3 million dollars in support of Save the Children, and so I am especially honored to be recognized by this impactful organization and among such distinguished company. The fact that our Calvin Klein division is hosting Save the Children's first major fundraising event in New York City creates a wonderful synergy and makes it especially meaningful."

"Save the Children is incredibly grateful for the support of Calvin Klein," said Mark Shriver, Senior Vice President of Strategic Initiatives of Save the Children. "We know from more than 80 years of experience, that early childhood education can ensure a brighter future for a child living in poverty. With nearly 1 in 4 children in the United States living in poverty today, there is an even greater urgency for increased investments in high-quality early learning programs. The gala will shine a spotlight on this need and, we hope, inspire Americans from all walks of life to take action."

Save the Children is the leading independent organization creating lasting change in the lives of children in need around the world. In the United States, we strive to ensure that the most underserved children start school ready for success, thrive academically and developmentally, and are healthy and active; we also work to ensure that all children are safe and protected when disaster strikes. Through our early childhood development, literacy, health, and emergency preparedness and response programs, we are giving 240,000 children in 20 states and the District of Columbia a chance at a brighter future. For more information, please visit savethechildren.org.

Calvin Klein, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of PVH Corp. [NYSE: PVH], is one of the leading fashion design and marketing studios in the world. It designs and markets women's and men's designer collection apparel and a range of other products that are manufactured and marketed through an extensive network of licensing agreements and other arrangements worldwide. Product lines under the various Calvin Klein brands include women's dresses and suits, men's dress furnishings and tailored clothing, men's and women's sportswear and bridge and collection apparel, golf apparel, jeanswear, underwear, fragrances, eyewear, women's performance apparel, hosiery, socks, footwear, swimwear, jewelry, watches, outerwear, handbags, small leather goods, and home furnishings (including furniture). For more information, please visit calvinklein.com.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)
Philip Carroll 202.640.6823 (O), 202.215.0638 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (Sept. 12, 2013) — The United Nations has today published its annual statistics on child mortality around the world. The data reveals that the number of children dying every year has halved in a generation – down from 12 million in 1990 to 6.6 million in 2012.

"Dramatic global progress is being made in saving children's lives and we are now at an historic point where ending preventable child deaths lies within our grasp," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "This demonstrates that widespread efforts to improve access to life-saving healthcare for some of the world's most vulnerable children are working. But these efforts need to be stepped up in order to prevent millions more children from dying."

The new data reveals that this historic opportunity is at risk because two main challenges remain: the poorest children are being excluded and too many children are still not surviving the first month of life. Governments need to take urgent action to deliver health care and nutrition to every child if we are going to see sustainable progress in coming years, and give special attention to newborns and the most excluded. Every child has the right to survive, no matter where they are born. Donor countries and international organisations should also make sure no child dies for lack of resources.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



New research reveals that in Pakistan, Zimbabwe and five other countries, out-of-school support is key to improving reading skills among girls, children living in poverty and those with few books or readers at home.

Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.5859

Kids are learning to read outside of school hours through Literacy Boost, and the results show that it works. Read more in our new Save the Children report, Beyond Classroom Walls: A Boost for Readers
Kids are learning to read outside of school hours through Literacy Boost, and the results show that it works. Read more in our new Save the Children report
Beyond Classroom Walls: A Boost for Readers.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Sept. 6, 2013) — More than a third of all primary-school age children around the world still cannot read or write, whether they attend school or not. The good news: Save the Children's new report shows that teaching children early on how to read not only in school but also through activities outside the classroom effectively boosts reading ability.

"Worldwide, 250 million children of primary school age cannot read or write. Going to school isn't enough to guarantee learning," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO for Save the Children. "The gap in reading ability between strong and struggling readers widens with age, which is why it's critically important that children learn to read early on."

In its report, Beyond School Walls: A Boost for Readers, Save the Children reviewed results from the first year of its Literacy Boost program in seven participating countries. The program helps improve children's reading ability by measuring their skill level, training teachers and engaging communities.

The new study focuses on the most struggling readers in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Nepal, Pakistan and Zimbabwe: children living in poverty, girls and children with few books or readers at home. The findings show that, across the board, Literacy Boost program participants demonstrated significantly greater growth in reading ability than students not enrolled in the program. Additionally, Literacy Boost students were much more likely to stay in school than their peers who do not attend the program.

Here is a peek at some of the results:

  • Getting an A for Attendance: Children living in extreme poverty who participate in Literacy Boost were 91.6 percent more likely in Pakistan, 73.5 percent more likely in Zimbabwe and 30 percent more likely in Bangladesh to stay in school than their peers who do not participate in the program.
  • Learning the ABCs: Girls attending Literacy Boost learned 6.5 times more letters of the alphabet in Pakistan, and 2.5 times more letters in Nepal, than female students who did not enroll in the program.
  • Reading it Right: In Zimbabwe and Pakistan, female students participating in Literacy Boost made nearly twice as much progress in reading words and sentences correctly than girls not enrolled in the program.
  • Becoming a Word Whiz: In Ethiopia and Zimbabwe, Literacy Boost students from homes with the fewest books more than doubled their word-reading ability over the course of the year.
  • Connecting the Dots: In Pakistan and Malawi, Literacy Boost students from homes with the fewest books made three times as much progress in understanding what they read as their peers not enrolled in the program.

The report's release leads up to this month's meeting of world leaders at the United Nations headquarters to review the progress made toward the global goal of getting and keeping more children in school.

"The new research shows that now is the time to think of creative ways to foster in all children a lifelong love of learning that extends beyond school," said Miles. "We urge the decision-makers to think outside the box and take a closer look at Save the Children's approach to learning in and out of the classroom, which in just one year has proven effective in seven countries."

To read the full report and watch a short video, visit: www.savethechildren.org/literacy-boost

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



28 states still lack basic measures to safeguard children in child care and schools, Save the Children disaster report card finds

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.247.6610

Didi, 4, at a Save the Children Child-Friendly Space in an Atlantic City shelter after Superstorm Sandy last year. Photo by Susan Warner.
Didi, 4, at a Save the Children Child-Friendly Space in an Atlantic City shelter after Superstorm Sandy last year. Photo by Susan Warner.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Sept. 4, 2013) — Despite a record disaster year and high-profile school tragedies, most states still fail to meet basic child-safety measures endorsed by a national commission after Hurricane Katrina, Save the Children reported Wednesday.

Upon the release of its annual disaster report card, Save the Children congratulated four states that took action to protect children over the past year: New Jersey, Tennessee, Nebraska and Utah.

But the nation's leading child-focused emergency response organization faulted 28 states and the District of Columbia for failing to meet minimum standards to protect children in child care and schools.

"Since we released our last report card, our nation has experienced the second costliest disaster year on record and hundreds of thousands of children have faced enormous risks. They've lost their homes, schools, child care centers and even their lives," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children.

"The devastation left by Hurricanes Sandy and Isaac, the Oklahoma tornadoes and the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School should be a wake-up call, but too many states won't budge. It's like they're stuck in a pre-Katrina world where the gaps in protecting children weren't so clear," Miles said.

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina showed the United States how unprepared the nation was for major disaster. Children were extremely vulnerable, often unprotected, and it took six months to reunite the last child with her family. Out of that experience, a presidentially-appointed National Commission on Children and Disaster led by Save the Children recommended minimum standards to protect children.

Save the Children's disaster report card tracks progress on four critical standards: that states require all child care centers to have 1) an evacuation plan, 2) a family reunification plan, and 3) a plan for children with special needs, and 4) that states require all schools to have disaster plans that account for multiple types of hazards.

Since Save the Children issued its first disaster report card in 2008, the number of states to meet all standards has risen from four to 22. But most states and the nation's capital still fall short.

"Every workday, 68 million children are separated from their parents," Miles said. "We owe it to these children to protect them before the next disaster strikes."

Save the Children's new report, "Unaccounted For: A National Report Card on Protecting Children in Disaster," outlines glaring gaps in emergency preparedness, response and recovery, underscored by a remarkable year of domestic disaster. Too often, the unique needs of children remain unaccounted for around emergencies, the report says.

In response, Save the Children is calling on Americans to urge their governors to either meet the report card standards or make sure child-focused emergency plans are in place and practiced once required. The agency is also launching a new preparedness initiative called "Get Ready. Get Safe." to help families and communities protect children at times of disaster.

See the full report and take action at www.savethechildren.org/Get-Ready.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (September 3, 2013) – Two million Syrians – including more than one million children – have fled the country as the violence drags into a third year. In neighboring countries, the number of refugees has risen sharply this year and shows no signs of abating.

As discussions over military intervention in Syria continue, we must not lose sight of the fact that this is one of the worst humanitarian crises of our generation.

An estimated 6.8 million people - including more than three million children - need urgent assistance. Families, who have been forced to flee their homes, are struggling to find shelter in makeshift camps or half-ruined buildings. Medicine, food and water are running out. Hospitals have been bombed, schools are closed and children have reported that the shelling is constant and terrifying.

We have already taken steps to prepare for a major increase in refugee numbers across the region – which may occur if a military intervention takes place – and we are getting supplies and additional staff ready.

Whatever course of action is agreed over the next few days over the alleged use of chemical weapons, the international community must not avert its gaze from the humanitarian catastrophe.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.  



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (August 23, 2012) — Children caught in fighting in Syria are being killed, maimed, and denied access to food and medicine as the number of child refugees fleeing the civil war tops one million, Save the Children said today.

Save the Children has spoken to families trapped by some of the worst violence yet seen in the two-and-a-half year conflict. They tell of a desperate struggle to survive, living under bombardment, the threat of violence and ever-dwindling supplies as the war chokes Syrian cities.

Outside Syria, the number of refugees forced to abandon their homes and livelihoods and settle in neighboring countries has increased sharply in 2013 — there has been a tenfold increase since the same day in 2012.

"It is appalling that the world has stood and watched as one million children have been forced from their country, terrified, traumatized and in some cases orphaned," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children.

"This is not a crisis we can sit out; it is not going away. The refugee disaster the war in Syria has created is getting far worse, far faster than the world can cope with. It is now critically important world leaders secure humanitarian access across Syria.

"More than 7,000 children are dead and one million have been exiled as a result of this war. How many more grim milestones must the world witness before we put a stop to these horrors?"

Countries with large refugee populations are struggling to cope with the influx, and close to two-thirds of funding pledged to help countries deal with the refugee crisis has yet to materialize. In just the past week, close to 30,000 refugees have fled Syria for northern Iraq.

More than half of all refugees affected by the war are children. They remain the most vulnerable group, even after their families have escaped the imminent threat of death inside Syria.

The United Nations estimates more than 7,000 children have been killed in the war so far — a number likely to be far higher as most of Syria's dead are registered without their age.

Without immediate humanitarian access to Syria, Save the Children is gravely concerned the numbers of child refugees will continue to rise as conditions worsen.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Jeremy Soulliere 203.341.8203 (O) 203.295.5842 (M)

Dan Hobbs stands on top of Matterhorn Peak in Colorado in 2011. The father of two is setting out Thursday, Aug. 22, to climb 57 Colorado mountains in under 30 days to raise funds for Save the Children. Photo credit: Forrest Hobbs.
Dan Hobbs stands on top of Matterhorn Peak in Colorado in 2011. The father of two is setting out Thursday, Aug. 22, to climb 57 Colorado mountains in under 30 days to raise funds for Save the Children. Photo credit: Forrest Hobbs.

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (Aug. 22, 2013) — Going to the top of the mountain to help Save the Children is not enough for Dan Hobbs.

Today, the Minneapolis resident will set out to climb 57 mountains — the Colorado "fourteeners" — in under 30 days to raise funds for the international relief and development organization. Each mountain stretches above 14,000 feet.

"Climbing the 57 Colorado 'fourteens' was a lofty goal, and will be harder than just about anything else I've done up to this point," said Hobbs, 28, who is president of HSL Rentals, a rental real-estate company in the greater Minneapolis-St. Paul area. "The sheer physical and mental difficulty of it also serves as a great way to get people's attention to a higher cause — afflicted and oppressed people and children."

A father of two young kids, Hobbs says being a parent has helped spark "his motivations for helping other children," and led him to his decision to take on this mountainous feat to raise funds for Save the Children.

"Realizing that the millions of persecuted and afflicted kids around the globe are no different than my kids — but are subject to the terrors of war and famine — this makes me even more motivated to help," said Hobbs. "Save the Children works in a variety of ways across the globe, protecting and saving kids. They are also developing a better future for children, so these kids and their eventual children won't need to live in the current conditions and be afflicted by such great hardships.

Hobbs — who began mountain climbing with his father, who will be joining him for portions of the trek — says he will be averaging roughly 7,000 vertical feet and nearly 20 miles of ground per day.

"Using this to raise awareness and money for afflicted kids was a pretty easy decision. Carrying it out is going to be quite a bit more difficult," he said. "I am a climber and a runner, so this was a great combination of the two, and probably about as extreme of an endeavor as I could have chosen."

Robin Van Etten, Senior Director of Individual Giving at Save the Children, said the organization is very thankful Hobbs has decided to take on this lofty challenge to benefit Save the Children.

"We're grateful to Mr. Hobbs and his efforts on behalf of Save the Children. Donations like these help us to be as effective as possible in improving the lives of children here in the U.S. and around the world," she said.

To learn more about Hobbs' fundraising venture, visit www.rundanrun.org or www.facebook.com/danisrunning.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WASHINGTON, D.C. (August 20, 2013) — Save the Children is ready to respond to the needs of 60,000 displaced people after floods triggered by heavy monsoon rain - and enhanced by Tropical Storm Trami - swept through the Filipino capital and five nearby regions.

At least three people have been killed in the floods, including a five-year-old boy. Schools, government offices, businesses and even the stock exchange were shut today. Heavy rain is expected to continue until the storm exits the Philippines on Wednesday. According to the Philippines' disaster agency, about 320 areas in 44 municipalities/cities have been flooded.

"Children are always most vulnerable in these situations," said Anna Lindenfors, country director for Save the Children in the Philippines. "We are especially worried about children who may have been separated from their parents during the flooding. Children are also less likely to be able to cope with torrents of floodwater. They would have been absolutely terrified, some would have panicked and as rains continue to fall it will place them in greater danger."

"Save the Children teams are already on standby in Manila, National Capital Region, to respond to the needs of the affected population. Our teams are currently monitoring the situation, and we are in the process of contacting our local partners in the affected areas, so that we can provide relief as necessary. We have pre-made relief packages in our warehouses ready to be mobilzed."

Save the Children has worked in the Philippines for the past 30 years and quickly delivers humanitarian relief after the nation's frequent typhoons and other disasters. Save the Children is currently responding to the needs of affected communities in Typhoon Bopha and Typhoon Utor. The Philippines experiences an average of 20 tropical storms a year and is located in a major earthquake zone housing a number of active volcanoes.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

Thousands of refugees are still stranded on the border waiting to be transported to emergency reception centres further in country.  Photo Credit: Tue Jakobsen/Save the Children
Thousands of refugees are still stranded on the border waiting to be transported to emergency reception centers further in country.
Photo Credit: Tue Jakobsen/Save the Children

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Aug. 18, 2013) —Thousands of Syrian refugees are stranded on the Iraqi border after more than 10,000 people, mainly women, children and the elderly, crossed in just two days, Save the Children says.

The influx follows a sharp deterioration in the security situation in northeastern parts of Syria, with thousands of people seeking safety in Iraq’s Kurdish region, overwhelming the aid effort there.

Around 7,000 refugees have been taken to an emergency camp, but thousands are still waiting to be registered at the border, and the influx is showing no signs of slowing down.

Save the Children has launched an emergency response to deal with the stranded refugees, distributing basic supplies to families waiting to be registered. Over the next few days, the aid agency will distribute more than 40,000 liters of water at the border crossing.

"This is an unprecedented influx of refugees, and the main concern is that so many of them are stuck out in the open at the border or in emergency reception areas with limited, if any, access to basic services," Alan Paul, Save the Children’s Emergency Team Leader said. "The refugee response in Iraq is already thinly stretched, and close to half of the refugees are children who have experienced things no child should. We urgently need to cover their basic needs: food, water and shelter."

With the Syrian conflict in its third year the Kurdistan region of Iraq already hosts more than 150,000 Syrian refugees, a figure UN expects will rise to as much as 350,000 by the end of the year.

It is still unclear how long the border will be kept open, but Save the Children will continue to coordinate closely with organizations and UN agencies to meet the needs of the new arrivals.

Save the Children is working in refugee camps across Iraq, including in the Kurdish region, as part of its Syria crisis response. It is also delivering aid in Lebanon, Jordan and Syria itself.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

BANGUI, Central African Republic (August 12, 2013) — More than 100,000 children forced to flee their homes since the rebel takeover of the Central African Republic last March are facing the threat of sexual abuse, disease and recruitment into armed groups, says Save the Children.

Save the Children, announcing details of its emergency response in the Central African Republic, is also concerned about rising rates of malnutrition and malaria among displaced populations.

"Thousands of children's lives are at risk. Families are running out of food, and many are still hiding in the bush, afraid to return home. When they are not direct victims of violence, children have often witnessed their homes and schools being looted and their parents threatened or beaten", said Maria Wangechi, Save the Children's CAR Country Director.

"Moreover, healthcare workers have had to flee as hospitals and health centers have been ransacked. Children and their families need urgent humanitarian assistance. It is imperative that the international community allocates adequate resources and funding to a humanitarian crisis that in many respects has been largely ignored and that continues to escalate."

Save the Children teams are already on the ground providing lifesaving health and nutritional support to medical facilities in some of the areas worst affected by the crisis, as well as in the capital Bangui. As unrest continues, Save the Children has started providing psychosocial support to children through its child-friendly spaces, distributing much needed drugs and medical equipment to looted health centers, setting up mobile clinics to reach vulnerable families in remote villages, and launching healthcare programs for both new mothers and victims of sexual violence.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153 (M)

Manila, Philippines (August 11, 2013) — As the Philippines braces for the imminent arrival of Typhoon Utor, aid workers from Save the Children are on high alert and stand ready to meet the needs of children affected by the storm, if there is a need for a humanitarian response.

The typhoon is expected to pound the country's northern Luzon region on Monday morning, bringing high winds, heavy rains and possible landslides. Already families living in vulnerable locations have been advised to evacuate, clearing low-lying and mountainous area where the typhoon is expected to hit.

Save the Children's Anna Lindenfors in the nation's capital Manila said, "The entire Luzon region is braced for heavy winds and rains as the typhoon draws closer. Save the Children is monitoring the situation closely. We have trained staff and partners on the ground ready to mount a response, and pre-made aid packages to distribute if needed. Save the Children knows from experience that children are always the most vulnerable in a disaster and we stand ready to respond to their needs."

Save the Children has been working in the Philippines since 1981 and has a long experience responding to emergencies in the Philippines. The aid agency mounted large-scale emergency responses to Typhoon Washi in 2011 and Typhoon Ketsana in 2009, and most recently to last year's Typhoon Bopha and Manila floods.

Donate to Save the Children's Philippines monsoon and typhoon emergency fund.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (O)
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709(O), 202.262.7171(M)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 26, 2013) — Save the Children thanks Congress for introducing new legislation that would help boost early learning opportunities in developing countries and prevent 57 million of the most vulnerable, marginalized children, including those in conflict zones, from missing out on school.

The Education for All Act, H.R. 2780, introduced by Representatives Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Dave Reichert (R-WA), acknowledges that without basic, quality education we will lose yet another generation of children to poverty, war and disease, according to a statement by Congresswoman Lowey.

"Education offers children in some of the toughest parts of the world a chance at a brighter future. Yet millions of children living in poverty and conflict zones are robbed of the opportunity to learn and fulfill their potential," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO for Save the Children. "Save the Children applauds Representatives Lowey and Reichert for being a vital voice for these often forgotten children and calling for an investment in their futures."

If passed, this legislation would help millions more children in developing countries realize their dreams of getting an education and create a positive ripple effect on families, communities and nations overall.

More than half of the children today who are being denied the chance to go to school live in conflict-affected countries, according to Attacks on Education, a new report released this month by Save the Children in partnership with UNESCO. The new legislation would help make sure that children are still able to learn and thrive in times of crises. What's more, the bill would ensure that the youngest and most disadvantaged children, including girls living in impoverished, rural areas, as well as the disabled, orphaned, those affected by HIV/AIDS, and victims of forced labor and trafficking, are not only in school, but learning.

"As this bill implies, access to education alone is not enough," said Miles. "We need to make sure that kids in school are learning – this can make a big difference in children's lives and offer the U.S. government some of the best returns on investment."

Save the Children commends Congressional leaders for prioritizing education through this bill, just as the world's leaders are beginning to shape the next set of global development goals to be launched in 2015.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

The wall in a classroom at El Jeel Eljaded School in Libya is riddled with bullet holes. Nearly 50 million children living in conflict-affected countries are unable to attend school. Jenn Warren/Save the Children
The wall in a classroom at El Jeel Eljaded School in Libya is riddled with bullet holes. Nearly 50 million children living in conflict-affected countries are unable to attend school. Jenn Warren/Save the Children

Read the Report

WESTPORT, Conn. (July 11, 2013) — Almost 50 million children living in conflict-affected countries are being denied the chance to go to school, while the number of reported attacks on education is rising, Save the Children has said.

The number of reported incidents of children being stopped from accessing education, physically attacked or recruited by armed groups has increased sharply over the past year, after monitoring efforts were stepped up in the face of the deteriorating situation in Syria and concerns over girls' access to education in parts of South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.

In a new report published today, Save the Children documents the impact of conflict on education, and includes new research done for Save the Children by UNESCO's Education for All Global Monitoring Report (EFAGMR) that finds 48.5 million children living in conflict areas are currently out of school, more than half of them at primary school age.

The conflict in Syria has contributed to the sharp increase in the number of reported incidents, according to Save the Children. Of more than 3,600 incidents recorded in 2012, more than 70 percent were in Syria.

The new research comes as Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai addresses the UN General Assembly on July 12 in her first public speech since she was attacked by gunmen on her way to school in Pakistan last October.

The report finds:

  • Of the nearly 50 million children aged between six and 15 out of school in conflict-affected countries in 2011, 28.5 million were primary school children, more than half of them girls.
  • In 2012, there were 3,600 documented attacks on education, including violence, torture and intimidation against children and teachers, resulting in death or grave injuries, the shelling and bombing of schools and the recruitment of school-aged children by armed groups.
  • Since the start of the Syria conflict, 3,900 schools have either been destroyed, damaged or are being occupied for purposes other than education.

In addition to the research, Save the Children has gathered first-hand testimonies of children caught up in attacks on education:

  • I am in ninth grade but this war stopped me from graduating. I should have graduated and gone to high school, to start building my future but no… my future is destroyed. – Motassem, 13, Syria
  • The day the rebels came, they destroyed the school. They went into the headmaster's office and destroyed everything; they destroyed the students' papers. – Salif, 13, Mali
  • Young people in the village are approached by guerrillas to recruit them. My cousin was tricked into going with them four months ago and I haven't heard from her in a month. – Paula, 15, Colombia

"Education offers children in some of the toughest parts of the world the chance at a brighter future. The attacks highlighted in our report are an attack on that future, robbing children of the chance to learn and fulfill their potential. The classroom should be a place of safety and security, not a battleground where children suffer the most appalling crimes. Children who are targeted in this way will pay the price for the rest of their lives," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children.

"Conflict is holding back progress, preventing millions of children from going to school every year. Our new analysis shows that children out of school in conflict-affected countries are being forgotten. Many of the affected children will never resume their education, and will be scarred physically and psychologically for life," said Pauline Rose, Director of the Global Monitoring Report.

Despite the high levels of children out of school and the sharp increase in attacks, levels of funding for education in humanitarian emergencies remain shockingly low. Education funding has continued to fall from 2 percent of overall humanitarian funding in 2011 to only 1.4 percent of overall humanitarian funding in 2012, below the 4 percent that the global community has been calling for since 2010.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Notes to editors:

  • In 2011 there were 28.5 million children aged between 6 and 11 out of school in conflict areas, compared to 28 million in 2008. The report for the first time includes the number of teenagers between ages 12 and 15 out of secondary school in conflict areas, totaling 20 million, giving a combined total of 48.5 million.
  • The Education For All Global Monitoring Report (EFAGMR) is developed annually by an independent team and published by UNESCO.
  • The analysis provided by the EFA GMR for this partnership with Save the Children is an update of calculations found in the 2011 EFA GMR, The hidden crisis: armed conflict and education.
  • In 2012, the UN Secretary General presented an annual report "Children and Armed Conflict" to the UN Security Council. Save the Children referenced this report and counted 3,643 attacks on education.
  • Since the start of the Syria conflict, 3,900 schools have either been destroyed, damaged or are being occupied for purposes other than in education. This number is based on figures reported by UNICEF in January 2013, which includes revised figures provided by the Syrian Ministry of Education in December 2012 and new figures obtained through ongoing education needs assessments carried out by UNICEF and partners in various parts of the country.


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Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171
Laura Peterson 802.488.2459

Isabella, 4, feeds a goat at the newly opened goat-raising center in the Mayan village of Aldea El Paraiso in the Guatemalan Quiché highlands on July 11, 2013. Photo credit: Susan Warner for Save the Children.
Isabella, 4, feeds a goat at the newly opened goat-raising center in the Mayan village of Aldea El Paraiso in the Guatemalan Quiché highlands on July 11, 2013. Photo credit: Susan Warner for Save the Children.

GUATEMALA CITY (July 11, 2013) — The sleepy Mayan village of Aldea El Paraiso in the Guatemalan Quiché highlands was buzzing with action today during an opening ceremony of a new goat-raising center, hosted by the non-profit organization Save the Children in partnership with Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (GMCR) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). The center is part of a goat milk program designed to help chronically malnourished children get the key nutrients they need to be healthy and grow.

"One of the worst places in the world for chronic child malnutrition is not found in the brown deserts of Africa, but in the green mountains of Latin America," said Carlos Carrazana, Save the Children's Chief Operating Officer. "In Guatemala, nearly one in two children under the age of 5 is chronically malnourished, meaning they don't get enough of the right kinds of food each day to fuel their growing brains and bodies."[i]

Among indigenous populations in rural parts of El Quiché, the situation is even worse. The region's lush, rolling hills mask a hidden hunger crisis affecting 72 percent of its children under 5.[ii] That's why Save the Children, with support from GMCR and USAID, has opened the goat-raising center to offer milk as a source of protein for malnourished children in the region.

"Chronic malnutrition in El Quiché coffee-growing communities has kept many young children from reaching their cognitive and physical potential in life, a potential so necessary to move their communities from extreme levels of poverty," said Rick Peyser, Director of Social Advocacy and Supply Chain Community Outreach for GMCR. "Good nutrition is fundamental to the strength of our supply chain. The new Save the Children Goat Center in El Quiché will lead to healthier, more productive lives in communities that many coffee companies, including GMCR, depend on for their fine coffees."

"For over ten years, USAID Guatemala has supported Save the Children's innovative food security and nutrition programs for families living in extreme poverty and with very high rates of chronic malnutrition in Guatemala's Quiché department. Over the years, Save the Children has championed this exemplary 'family goat model.' Today it is our pleasure to join Save the Children and other important partners in this inauguration of The Goat Center which is the culmination of their laudable work to generate income and food security among the extreme poor in Guatemala's Western Highlands," said USAID Mission Director Kevin Kelly.

The center currently houses 85 goats (it has capacity for 300) and will serve 115 surrounding communities. Over the next three to five years, 2,200 families and more than 3,500 children will benefit from the goat center. In addition to providing milk for children, the program teaches families how to generate income year-round by raising goats and other farm animals, selling surplus milk, and making cheese and yogurt.

A Brewing Partnership

GMCR first partnered with Save the Children in 2009 to improve food security for coffee-producing families in Nicaragua. Since then, the company has contributed more than $7 million to Save the Children to provide similar programs in Indonesia, El Salvador, Bolivia, Honduras and Guatemala.

About Save the Children
Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

About Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (NASDAQ: GMCR)
As a leader in specialty coffee and coffee makers, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. (NASDAQ: GMCR) is recognized for its award-winning coffees, innovative brewing technology, and socially responsible business practices. GMCR supports local and global communities by investing in sustainably-grown coffee and allocating a portion of its pre-tax profits to socially and environmentally responsible initiatives. For more information, please visit www.GMCR.com, www.greenmountaincoffee.com, or www.keurig.com.

[i]National Survey of Maternal and Child Health 2008-2009
[ii]Ibid



Thousands of children and their families have been left stranded in mountains by heavy monsoon rains that swept through the northern Indian state of Uttarakhand, Save the Children reported today.

Two children stand next to their washed-away home. Their family received relief supplies at Rudraprayag. Photo by Save the Children

Help us respond to this disaster by contributing to our India Floods Children in Crisis Fund:

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Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 1, 2013) — The death toll from the devastating floods that hit India's northern state of Uttarakhand nearly two weeks ago could be as high as 10,000, the state's assembly speaker Govind Singh Kunjwal said this weekend. The official death toll has now passed 1,000.

An estimated 150,000 people, including 65,000 children, are thought to have been displaced by the floods. Save the Children has carried out assessments in two areas and has begun to distribute food and hygiene kits to more than 100 families. Save the Children expects to support 5,000 families.

Local villagers have told Save the Children that thousands of bodies are still lying out in the open, unattended. Decomposition has set in and because the bodies cannot be moved, cremation needs to be carried out on the spot. But there is not enough wood to carry out this task, creating public health concerns in parts of the region.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171

WESTPORT, Conn. (June 20, 2013) — Following a U.S. House vote to defeat a food aid reform amendment yesterday, Save the Children and 14 other organizations* issued this statement:

We are deeply disappointed that the House of Representatives rejected a bipartisan amendment to reform America's food aid system as part of H.R. 1947, the Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management (FARRM) Act. The common-sense amendment, offered by House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce (R-CA) and Ranking Member Eliot Engel (D-NY), would have modernized our Eisenhower-era food aid program and extended it to as many as four million more people per year while reducing the deficit and enabled an end to inefficient practices currently mandated by law.

In failing to pass the Royce-Engel Amendment, Congress rejected a pragmatic approach to food aid that promotes long-term self-sufficiency in poor countries while maintaining a central role for American farmers in helping to feed the world. Failure to pass this measure means that when the next food crisis strikes in Syria, Somalia, or elsewhere, the U.S. will continue to lack the flexibility to respond in the most effective way.

The reforms offered in the Royce-Engel amendment were not new concepts: similar reforms were proposed by the Bush Administration, and the Obama Administration requested many of the same changes as part of its Fiscal Year 2014 budget.

We thank Chairman Royce and Ranking Member Engel for their bold leadership. The effort to reform food aid is not over. Today's vote, the first time significant reforms have been debated and voted on the House floor, is the first step in a continued movement for more effective and efficient food aid. In only a few short months, food aid emerged as a top Congressional priority, and 203 Members of Congress supported bipartisan, common sense reform. Such progress is both unprecedented and encouraging. We look forward to continuing to work with the Chairman and Ranking Member, as well as the Administration, to reduce hunger around the world.

*Other organizations endorsing this statement include: American Jewish World Service; Bread for the World, CARE USA, Catholic Relief Services, Church World Service, InterAction, Lutheran World Relief, Mercy Corps, Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network, National Family Farm Coalition, ONE, Oxfam America, Partners in Health and World Food Program USA.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

Syrian children waking up inside their tent in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley. Photo: Moises Saman/Magnum for Save the Children
Syrian children waking up inside their tent in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley. Photo: Moises Saman/Magnum for Save the Children

WASHINGTON, D.C. (June 20, 2013) — Children have died by the roadside as growing numbers of desperate families flee Syria's bloody civil war, refugees told Save the Children.

Save the Children spoke to civilians who have recently fled the country who told of a "death journey" on which some children were separated from their parents, with at least one 12-year-old boy being left behind to die on his own after his mother was killed and he became too weak to continue the journey due to shrapnel wounds.

Another family reported the death of a baby who died in the heat after being separated from her mother as they fled across the border. Save the Children also received reports of children being targeted by sniper fire, forced to take flight under heavy shelling and driven to licking moisture from leaves in a desperate attempt to stave off thirst in the searing heat.

The reports, gathered by Save the Children ahead of World Refugee Day, paint a disturbing picture of the desperation and horror faced by Syrian children as they seek to escape the violence in the country. Some of the most graphic reports include:

  • A 12 year-old boy — whose mother had been shot — being left to bleed to death with insect-eaten shrapnel wounds as the group he was with were forced to abandon him and run for their lives
  • A baby separated from her mother dying in the heat due to a lack of milk
  • Children being trampled underfoot as desperate civilians run for their lives under shell fire
  • A 13 year-old girl being shot through her thigh during an escape attempt
  • A 16-year-old beaten with sticks and displaying signs of physical torture after 15 days' detention and interrogation
  • A 12-year-old boy having his throat cut by personnel manning a checkpoint

There are currently 1.6 million people from Syria in need of refugee assistance in Jordan, Turkey, Lebanon, Iraq and Egypt. The number of registered refugees has increased 17-fold in the past 12 months and the number is expected to reach 2 million this summer.

The number of people in need of refugee assistance from Syria has increased on average by close to a third each month for the past year. Were that trend to continue, Syria would be emptied of civilians by as early as April 2014.

"The horrific stories we've gathered from refugees over the past few days show how children are bearing the brunt of the Syrian conflict. Children in Syria are being killed, tortured, recruited as soldiers and abused in horrifying numbers. Children are being separated from their parents, and some are dying alone at the roadside from their wounds," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children.

"Meanwhile conditions are proving too much for the weakest and most vulnerable babies. Millions of children are beyond the reach of humanitarian aid and have no option but to flee. Over half of all Syrian refugees are children and behind the terrifying statistics of civilians fleeing their country are millions of individual tragedies.

"Ultimately the only solution to this crisis is an end to the violence in Syria, but in the meantime, we urgently need to be able to reach those trapped inside Syria. Unless we can, I am afraid we will hear more horrifying stories of children forced into ever more desperate circumstances."

Children inside Syria are especially vulnerable to the worst atrocities of the crisis. Those who manage to escape often lack access to schools and safe places to play and are frequently living in cramped, overcrowded conditions.

As well as working with refugee communities in Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq, Save the Children is working across Syria to bring vital humanitarian aid to the most vulnerable communities. However, due to restrictions posed by a lack of access, it is currently only reaching 10 percent of those people they aim to reach inside the country itself.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



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Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

Syria's children are in desperate need of help, both inside their country and in neighbouring countries where thousands have fled. Photo credit: Jonathan Hyams

WESTPORT, Conn. (June 18, 2013) — "The G8 statement on Syria offers welcome funding to help tackle the enormous humanitarian crisis, but does not go far enough in securing the access so badly needed to deliver this aid. The hard fact remains that millions of Syrians are beyond the reach of aid agencies like Save the Children, and the G8 now needs to increase pressure on all parties to allow unhindered access to the whole country. This new funding can save lives, but the clock is ticking for those trapped beyond the reach of aid agencies, and unless we can secure the access needed to reach them, children and their families will continue to suffer as long as this conflict continues."

- Statement from Save the Children

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (June 10, 2013) — Save the Children is pleased to announce its support for S. 1086, the Child Care Development and Block Grant Act of 2013, which would greatly improve the safety of children in child care facilities in the event of a disaster.

The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the main source of federal funding that provides assistance to child care programs and families. For the last several years, Save the Children, along with numerous other organizations (including the former National Commission on Children and Disasters), has been advocating for quality preparedness planning at child care facilities. During a normal work week, nearly 68 million children are in school or child care settings, and most parents assume that when they drop their kids off for the day, they will be safe if disaster strikes.

"Two-thirds of our nation's states do not require basic emergency preparedness regulations for child care facilities," said Kathy Spangler, Vice President of Save the Children's U.S. Programs. "With the beginning of the hurricane season, as well as the recent devastation in Oklahoma, it is more important than ever to focus on meeting this essential need for children."

Save the Children applauds Senators Barbara Mikulski (D-MD), Richard Burr (R-NC), Tom Harkin (D-IA), and Lamar Alexander (R-TN) for producing this bi-partisan measure and we urge their colleagues to support it. Not only would this legislation help child care centers prepare for emergencies, but it would also improve the overall quality of child care services including new workforce training standards and more comprehensive early learning and development guidelines.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Eileen Burke, 203-216-0718
(In London) Michael Klosson, Save the Children's Vice President of Policy and Humanitarian Response, 202-413-1016

WESTPORT, Conn (June 8, 2013) — Reacting to the outcome of today's global Nutrition for Growth event hosted in London by the UK government, the Brazilian government and the Children's Investment Fund Foundation ahead of the G8, Save the Children's president and CEO Carolyn Miles said:

"Today's event is a historic breakthrough in tackling under nutrition – by far the biggest cause of under-five child deaths worldwide.

"U.S. leadership gave young children a seat at the grown-up table and dished out a strong, commendable commitment to combatting child malnutrition.

"Save the Children applauds the Obama administration's pledge to reduce stunting among 2 million children through its Feed the Future program as a down payment to a broader stunting target. In addition, we are pleased to see a U.S. commitment of more than $1 billion in funding for global maternal and child nutrition programs. This new funding baseline is a positive step forward, and can make a real difference in children's lives around the world. But with malnutrition causing nearly 3.1 million child deaths each year and diminishing children's ability to learn and earn, an even greater investment is needed to wipe out this great scourge.

"We recognize that we are in a budget-constrained environment, and that Americans demand that their tax dollars be spent in the most efficient way possible. For that reason, we applaud the Obama administration's bold leadership to reform U.S. food assistance, which would help nutrition programs reach millions more children and their families around the world at no additional cost to American taxpayers. We will work with the Congress and Administration to improve efficiencies and maintain and grow funding over the long-term until every child gets the nutrition they need to fulfill their potential.

Today is an impressive start to the G8 period and the commitments made will change millions of lives. We now need to ensure that all global leaders, including the U.S. government, quickly deliver on the promises made. Hungry children can't wait."

Notes to Editors: Total funds mobilized for nutrition during today’s event included over $1 billion each from the UK and US governments and €3.5 billion from the European Commission.

 

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WASHINGTON, D.C. (June 7, 2013) — Gaining access to the millions of children trapped in Syria and at acute risk must become the international community's priority, Save the Children said today, as UN launched the largest emergency funding call in its history.

"What the UN announced today was the price tag of our collective political failure to end this conflict," said Carolyn S. Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "But money alone will not be enough: the international community must make securing better access for aid agencies to the worst-affected areas of Syria an urgent priority. It is the children of Syria who are bearing the real cost of this war. Growing numbers are being killed and maimed, denied education and forced to flee their homes."

According to the latest UN report, massacres are now happening inside Syria at the rate of one a week. Nothing can undo the horrors that children in Syria have faced, but we must ensure that full access is granted to humanitarian organisations to get aid to those most desperately in need.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Wendy Christian 203.465.8010
Jeanne-Aimee De Marrais 203.919.2219

WASHINGTON (May 31, 2013) — Save the Children's U.S. emergency response team is on the ground in Moore, Okla., where a new tornado emergency warning has been issued. The latest tornadoes have sent thousands in search of shelter in Moore and nearby towns. Our staff are prepared to meet the needs of children in the event of further damage from the latest round of twisters.

Since the devastating tornado swept through the area on May 20, we’ve opened four child-friendly spaces where children can play and regain a sense of normalcy, as well as summer camps for children displaced by tornadoes. Save the Children is also focused on the long-term recovery, supporting the reopening of schools, providing “Journey of Hope” psychosocial recovery programs and helping strengthen community preparedness to protect children.

To support our Oklahoma Tornadoes Children in Emergencies Fund, visit www.savethechildren.org/tornado.

Text TWISTER to 20222 to donate $10 to Save the Children and help the response effort. Standard rates apply. Read the the fine print.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need—access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Mobile Giving Details: The Fine Print

Msg and Data Rates May Apply. A one-time donation of $10.00 will be added to your mobile phone bill or deducted from your prepaid balance. All donations must be authorized by the account holder. All charges are billed by and payable to your mobile service provider. Service is available on most carriers. Donations are collected for the benefit of Save the Children by the Mobile Giving Foundation and subject to the terms found at www.hmgf.org/t. Messaging and Data Rates May Apply. You can unsubscribe at any time by texting STOP to short code 20222; text HELP to 20222 for help.



Statement by Carolyn S. Miles, President & CEO

Media Contact: Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (May 31, 2013) —  Today’s report offers a blueprint for eliminating extreme poverty within a generation. The report envisages a world in which no child is born to die, no child goes to bed hungry, every child learns in school and every child grows up to a sustainable and more prosperous future. This may sound too good to be true, but by building on recent progress and with the right political commitment it’s entirely achievable.

It is now up to all UN Member States to drive this agenda forward and avoid subordinating the central ideas to narrow interests. Critically, we must sustain the ambition, human focus and attention to the hardest to reach captured in the Panel’s report.

President Obama laid out a bold vision for ending extreme poverty and preventable child deaths in his State of the Union Address, and we see those same powerful themes reflected in the High Level Panel report. We hope that the President will make an ambitious post2015 development framework part of his legacy as these ideas get debated between now and 2015.

Save the Children particularly welcomes four key elements within the report:

  • The clear focus on eradicating extreme poverty and ending preventable child deaths by 2030.
  • The focus on the needs of those left behind by economic growth and development. In particular the commitments to ‘zero goals’ (for example in poverty and child mortality) and the recommendation to only consider a target reached if it is achieved within all key economic and social groups. 
  • The integration of key elements missing from the MDGs, especially inequality, sustainability, accountability and conflict.
  • A focus on eliminating all forms of violence against children.

As the process of consultation goes forward, Save the Children will seek to strengthen the commitments on universal access to high quality health services and stronger attempts to address income inequality.

Save the Children is a member of Beyond 2015, which is a global campaign with more than 600 participating organizations in nearly 100 countries. Beyond 2015 is calling for an ambitious post-2015 agenda in line with our vision of a more equitable and sustainable world. The High-Level Panel report must deliver recommendations that are fit for purpose and in line with this vision.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



These Precautionary Measures will Keep Kids Safe and Calm in the Event of an Emergency

Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171

Felicia Owen's grandmother's house in the Highland neighborhood of Moore, Oklahoma was totally destroyed when the tornado hit on May 20, 2013. Felicia and her friend Jamie Johnson are working to salvage what they can from the house. Pictured here are Jamie's children (Randa, 14, Shelby, 16, and Brett, 10) and Felicia's 9-year-old daughter Mykayla.
Felicia Owen's grandmother's house in the Highland neighborhood of Moore, Oklahoma was totally destroyed when the tornado hit on May 20, 2013. Felicia and her friend Jamie Johnson are working to salvage what they can from the house. Pictured here are Jamie's children (Randa, 14, Shelby, 16, and Brett, 10) and Felicia's 9-year-old daughter Mykayla.

WASHINGTON, D.C.(May 29, 2013) — As tornado-ravaged Oklahoma and other states across the Midwest brace for more severe storms, the East Coast is getting ready for hurricane season. In light of National Hurricane Preparedness week, now through June 1, Save the Children is releasing its disaster preparedness tips to help parents across America keep their children safe when disasters like hurricanes or tornadoes strike.

"Disasters can cause fear, anxiety and stress in children that can last long after the initial impact," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "That's why we have to do everything we can to minimize the emotional effect of such traumatizing events on children, who are the most vulnerable during emergencies, and provide the support they need."

In addition to basic survival items such as water, a flashlight and a battery-powered radio, families with children need to include kid-friendly supplies in their emergency kits. Based upon Save the Children's years of domestic and international experience of coming to the aid of children in emergencies, these tips can be used as a guide for parents to support their loved ones in the event of a crisis.

Save the Children Disaster Checklist for Families

  • Comfort Items:Stuffed animal, doll, pacifier or blanket
  • Personal Hygiene:Baby wipes, feminine products, diapers, nursing pads
  • Children's Activities:Books, puzzles, games
  • Infant Nutrition:Nursing supplies, formula, pre-packaged baby food
  • Medical Needs:Infant/child fever reducer, rash ointment
  • Family meet-up:Pick a safe spot to meet if separated such as a local school or library
  • Out-of-towner:A family contact who would not be affected by a local disaster
  • ICE:Cell phones should have "ICE" (In Case of Emergency) programmed into their contacts
  • Text:Text messages can often get through, even when a phone call can't
  • Contact school or day care:Ensure they know what your child is supposed to do in case of an emergency
  • Identification:Write down your child's name and your contact information on a notecard and keep it with your child

Save the Children's U.S. emergency response team is making sure the needs of children in tornado-affected Oklahoma are prioritized during the recovery process. The organization is working with the community to open safe play areas in shelters and help restore child care services so parents and children can begin rebuilding their lives. In addition, Save the Children is helping lead the creation of a task force with federal, state and local partners in Oklahoma to address children's needs through summer programs and when school resumes.

You can text TWISTER to 20222 to donate $10 to Save the Children and help the response effort. Standard rates apply. Read the the fine print.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Mobile Giving Details: The Fine Print

Msg and Data Rates May Apply. A one-time donation of $10.00 will be added to your mobile phone bill or deducted from your prepaid balance. All donations must be authorized by the account holder. All charges are billed by and payable to your mobile service provider. Service is available on most carriers. Donations are collected for the benefit of Save the Children by the Mobile Giving Foundation and subject to the terms found at www.hmgf.org/t. Messaging and Data Rates May Apply. You can unsubscribe at any time by texting STOP to short code 20222; text HELP to 20222 for help.



Media Contact
Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)
Jeremy Soulliere 203.341.8203 (O) 203.295.5842 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (May 29, 2013) — Save the Children announced today the appointment of Robert Thompson as vice president, resource development, effective June 17.

In this position, Thompson will oversee all private fundraising efforts for the global humanitarian agency, headquartered in Westport, Conn. He will lead a team of more than 100 to build a diverse and strong mix of funding sources, including corporate and foundation partners and major individual gifts, to help Save the Children better fulfill its mission of creating lasting change for children. He will also serve as a member of the senior leadership team for the organization.

Thompson comes to Save the Children with more than 30 years of fundraising experience, most recently as senior vice president, development, for the U.S. Fund for UNICEF in New York City. Prior to that, Thompson held senior development positions at Columbia University Medical Center and the Institute for Cancer Prevention.

"Robert has an impressive record of high-net-worth individual stewardship and board cultivation," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "I am confident he has the expertise to help us meet our ambitious goals for children and take this organization to the next level of excellence."

Thompson is a graduate of Wake Forest University. He and his family live in Summit, N.J.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709(O), 202.262.7171(M)

May 22, 2013 Candace Phillips and her 7 day old baby Connor. Their house is across the street from Briarwood School. Photo Credit: Justin Clemons
May 22, 2013 Candace Phillips and her 7 day old baby Connor. Their house is across the street from Briarwood School. Photo Credit: Justin Clemons

WASHINGTON (May 28, 2013) — The Toys"R"Us Children's Fund announced a $100,000 donation to Save the Children to provide immediate and longer-term recovery programs for communities in Moore, Oklahoma following this week's devastating tornado.

To provide urgent assistance to families in shelters, Toys"R"Us, Inc. has made local product donations to help children impacted by the tornado. The company is also encouraging its customers to join in helping the littlest victims of this disaster by donating products through the official Save the Children registry at www.Babiesrus.com/SavetheChildren.

As a national leader in child-focused disaster response and recovery programs, Save the Children is deploying Child Friendly Space kits in shelters, creating safe play areas for kids impacted by the tornado. Its efforts will also include a review of the impact on child care centers, long term psycho-social support programs and assessing the status of local summer programs for children which may have been affected due to destruction of facilities and supplies.

Toys"R"Us, Inc. has more than 200 employees across seven stores in Oklahoma. The company is providing support to employees who may have been affected by the disaster through the Geoffrey Fund, which offers financial assistance to its team members in times of hardship.

Toys"R"Us, Inc. and the Toys"R"Us Children's Fund have an ongoing partnership with Save the Children to provide children and families with needed assistance in the wake of large-scale disasters in the U.S. and around the world.

About the Toys"R"Us Children's Fund

The Toys"R"Us Children's Fund is a public charity affiliated with Toys"R"Us, Inc., a company that unabashedly declares "We love kids!" The core mission of the Toys"R"Us Children's Fund is to keep children safe and help them in times of need. Since it was founded in 1992, the Toys"R"Us Children's Fund has contributed millions of dollars to qualified organizations that support that mission, including those providing disaster relief to children and families who are victims of large-scale crises. The Toys"R"Us Children's Fund also provides grants to leading organizations that assist children with special needs.

Primary fundraising activities include the annual Toys"R"Us Children's Fund Gala, a private, invitation-only event that showcases the work of the Fund and raises money to support its many beneficiaries. This annual benefit has raised $100 million since its inception in 1985 and is one of the largest single-night fundraising events held in New York City.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



New Research Shines Spotlight on Far-Reaching Effects of Chronic Child Hunger Ahead of G8 Global Nutrition Summit

Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

Poor nutrition limits children's ability to learn and to earn, says Save the Children report.
Poor nutrition limits children's ability to learn and to earn, says Save the Children report.

WESTPORT, Conn. (May 27, 2013) — Chronically malnourished children are on average nearly 20 percent less literate than those who have a nutritious diet, according to ground-breaking new research released today by Save the Children.

In the study, Save the Children sheds new light on how missing out on nutritious food can impact a child's cognitive development, and its far-reaching effects on economic growth. Recent findings suggest that the global economic impact of malnutrition could be up to $125 billion.

The Food for Thought report comes just 10 days before the Nutrition for Growth summit in London in advance of this year's G8, where world leaders from both developing and donor countries are called upon to commit to more leadership and funding to transform the lives of millions of malnourished children. Despite enormous progress in other areas - such as halving the number of child deaths over the last two decades – Save the Children says malnutrition is acting as an Achilles heel to development and that momentum will stall if the world fails to tackle the condition. The U.S. government is expected to come to London with robust funding for nutrition and a concrete, measurable plan to tackle the problem, including efforts to reform U.S. food aid policy that would feed 2-4 million more children at no extra cost.

Poor nutrition reduces children's ability to learn and to earn

The research shows that not having a nutritious diet can severely impair a child's ability to read and write a simple sentence and answer basic math questions correctly – regardless of the amount and quality of schooling they received.

"A quarter of the world's children are suffering the effects of chronic malnutrition. Poor nutrition in the early years is driving a literacy and numeracy crisis in developing countries and is also a huge barrier to further progress in tackling child deaths," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children CEO and President.

"Improving the nutritional status of children and women in the crucial 1,000-day window – from the start of a woman's pregnancy until her child's second birthday – could greatly increase a children's ability to learn and to earn," said Miles. "World leaders gathering in London on June 8th must commit to concrete actions to tackle malnutrition in those critical 1,000 days, and invest in the future of our children."

The research was based on studies of thousands of children in four countries (Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam), and found that at the age of eight, children who are stunted due to chronic malnutrition are 19 percent more likely to make a mistake reading a simple sentence like "I like dogs" or "The sun is hot" than they would have been expected to do had they not been stunted.

Stunted children are 12.5 percent more likely to make a mistake writing a simple sentence and do 7 percent worse answering simple math questions like "What is 8 minus 3?" than they would have been expected to do had they not been stunted.

Undernourished children could earn up to 20 percent less as adults

Save the Children's report also highlights the huge economic cost of chronic malnutrition. Malnourished children could earn as much as 20 percent less in adulthood.

Despite being one of the most cost effective forms of development assistance, spending on nutrition programs currently amounts to just 0.3 per cent of global development spending. Any investment now, the report says, would be a down payment on future prosperity.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Organization Establishes Safe Play Area for Displaced Children; Assesses Child Care Facility Damage; and Works with Community to Help Families Rebuild Lives.

Felicia Owen's grandmother's house in the Highland neighborhood of Moore, Okla., was totally destroyed when the tornado hit on May 20. Owen and her friend Jamie Johnson are working to salvage what they can from the house. Pictured here are Johnson's children, Randa, 14, Shelby, 16, and Brett, 10, as well as Owen's 9-year-old daughter, Mykayla. Justin Clemons/Getty images for Save the Children.
Felicia's grandmother's house in the Highland neighborhood of Moore, Okla., was totally destroyed when the tornado hit on May 20. Felicia and her friend Jamie are working to salvage what they can from the house. Pictured here are Jamie's children, Randa, 14, Shelby, 16, and Brett, 10, as well as Felicia's 9-year-old daughter, Mykayla. Justin Clemons/Getty images for Save the Children.

Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171

WASHINGTON (May 24, 2013) — Save the Children's U.S. emergency response team is making sure the needs of children in tornado-affected Oklahoma are prioritized as the recovery process begins. The organization has already established a safe play area, called a Child-Friendly Space, at the Moore Community Center, and will be creating these safe spaces at additional shelters where displaced families continue to arrive.

"Living through a major disaster often has a long-lasting emotional impact on children, especially the youngest ones, who need to regain a sense of normalcy and routine in order to begin to recover," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "That's why Save the Children is working with the community to open safe play areas in shelters and help restore child-care services so parents and children can begin rebuilding their lives."

In addition, Save the Children is helping lead the creation of a task force with federal, state and local partners in Oklahoma to address children's needs through summer programs and when school resumes.

"I feel like I just came out of a daze and realized I'm homeless," said a mom named Kristi, whose family has lost everything during the tornado. "So many things go through your mind. You reach for a toothbrush and you don't have it. You reach for a comb and you don't have it. There's nothing left."

Save the Children is meeting family after family in Oklahoma who have suffered unimaginable loss. Children's lives have been turned upside down, their day care centers, schools and life as they knew it are all gone. Children, like Kristi's 3-year-old daughter, are now homeless and their futures uncertain.

To support our Oklahoma Tornadoes Children in Emergencies Fund, visit www.savethechildren.org/tornado.

Text TWISTER to 20222 to donate $10 to Save the Children and help the response effort. Standard rates apply. Read the the fine print.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need—access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Mobile Giving Details: The Fine Print

Msg and Data Rates May Apply. A one-time donation of $10.00 will be added to your mobile phone bill or deducted from your prepaid balance. All donations must be authorized by the account holder. All charges are billed by and payable to your mobile service provider. Service is available on most carriers. Donations are collected for the benefit of Save the Children by the Mobile Giving Foundation and subject to the terms found at www.hmgf.org/t. Messaging and Data Rates May Apply. You can unsubscribe at any time by texting STOP to short code 20222; text HELP to 20222 for help.



Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709(W), 202.262.7171(M)

WASHINGTON (May 21, 2013) — "Disasters such as the Oklahoma tornadoes can cause fear, anxiety and stress in children, which can last long after the initial impact," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO for Save the Children. "That's why we have to do everything we can to minimize the emotional effect of such traumatizing events on children and provide the support they need."

Based upon Save the Children's years of domestic and international experience of coming to the aid of children in emergencies, these tips can be used as a guide for parents to support their loved ones in the event of a crisis.

10 Tips to Help Kids Cope with Disasters

  1. Limit TV time. Watching television reports on disasters can overwhelm younger children who may not understand an event is being replayed and instead think the disaster is happening over and over again. Overexposure to coverage of the events affects teenagers and adults as well.
  2. Listen to your children carefully. Emotional stress results in part when a child cannot give meaning to dangerous experiences. Begin a dialog to help them gain a basic understanding that is appropriate for their age and responds to their underlying concerns.
  3. Give children reassurance. Let them know that if any emergency or crisis should occur, your primary concern will be their safety. Make sure they know they are being protected.
  4. Be alert for significant changes. Be aware of changes in sleeping patterns, eating habits, concentration, wide emotional swings or frequent physical complaints without apparent illness. They will likely subside within a short time but if prolonged, we encourage you to seek professional support and counseling.
  5. Expect the unexpected. As children develop, their intellectual, physical and emotional capacities change. Younger children will depend largely on their parents to interpret events, while older children and teenagers will get information from a variety of sources that may not be as reliable. While teenagers seem to have more adult capacities to recover, they still need extra love, understanding and support to process these events.
  6. Give your children extra time and attention. They need your close, personal involvement to comprehend that they are safe and secure. Talk, play and listen to them. Find time to engage in special activities for children of all ages.
  7. Be a model for your child. Your child will learn how to deal with these events by seeing how you deal with them. Base the amount of self-disclosure on the age and developmental level of each of your children. Explain your feelings but remember to do so calmly.
  8. Watch your own behavior. Make a point of showing sensitivity toward those impacted by the disaster. This is an opportunity to teach your children that we all need to help each other.
  9. Help your children return to normal activities. Children almost always benefit from activity,goal orientation and sociability. Ensure that your child's school environment is also returning to normal patterns and not spending great amounts of time discussing the crisis.
  10. Encourage your child to do volunteer work. Helping others can give your child a sense of control, security and empathy. In the midst of crisis, adolescents and youth can emerge as active agents of positive change.

Save the Children's U.S. emergency response team is mobilizing staff and essential supplies to provide support, relief and recovery services to communities and families in Oklahoma.

You can text TWISTER to 20222 to donate $10 to Save the Children and help the response effort. Standard rates apply. Read the the fine print.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need—access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Mobile Giving Details: The Fine Print

Msg and Data Rates May Apply. A one-time donation of $10.00 will be added to your mobile phone bill or deducted from your prepaid balance. All donations must be authorized by the account holder. All charges are billed by and payable to your mobile service provider. Service is available on most carriers. Donations are collected for the benefit of Save the Children by the Mobile Giving Foundation and subject to the terms found at www.hmgf.org/t. Messaging and Data Rates May Apply. You can unsubscribe at any time by texting STOP to short code 20222; text HELP to 20222 for help.



Organization Mobilizes Efforts to Assess Children’s Needs and Provide Support in The Wake of the Tornado Devastation

Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 21, 2013) — Save the Children's U.S. emergency response team is mobilizing staff and essential supplies to provide support, relief and recovery services to communities and families in Oklahoma.  

"We know from experience that children are always the most vulnerable during emergencies," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "Children and families in and around Moore, Okla., have experienced destruction and loss and need our support to help them recover."

As a national leader in child-focused disaster response and recovery programs, Save the Children is prepared to quickly deploy our Child Friendly Space kits in shelters, creating safe play areas where kids can be kids again. We are also ready to deploy infant and toddler hygiene materials to support young children's well-being while they are displaced from their homes.

Save the Children's disaster-tested programs have served thousands of children in major U.S. emergencies, including hurricane Katrina and the tornado outbreaks in 2011 that devastated areas of Tuscaloosa, Ala., and Joplin, Mo.

Save the Children has led and supported child-focused community resilience building programs in Oklahoma over the last five years.  We will seek, not only to support the immediate needs of children in the tornado-affected communities, but also to partner with communities to strengthen their ability to protect children and help them recover when a disaster strikes.

You can also text TWISTER to 20222 to donate $10 to Save the Children and help the response effort. Standard rates apply. Read the the fine print.

About Save the Children
Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

In the United States, Save the Children’s early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 185,000 children last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Mobile Giving Details: The Fine Print

Msg and Data Rates May Apply. A one-time donation of $10.00 will be added to your mobile phone bill or deducted from your prepaid balance. All donations must be authorized by the account holder. All charges are billed by and payable to your mobile service provider. Service is available on most carriers. Donations are collected for the benefit of Save the Children by the Mobile Giving Foundation and subject to the terms found at www.hmgf.org/t. Messaging and Data Rates May Apply. You can unsubscribe at any time by texting STOP to short code 20222; text HELP to 20222 for help.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 14, 2013) — Save the Children's field offices are on high alert as Tropical Cyclone Mahasen crosses the Bay of Bengal towards the Bangladesh-Myanmar coast.

The Category 1 storm packs wind of up to 75 mph and is expected to make landfall in Chittagong, Bangladesh, on Thursday morning.

Bangladeshi authorities have sent out warnings to the coastal population in the southeastern area of the country, and advised fishermen not to venture out to sea. In Myanmar, authorities have started evacuating people in Rakhine State, the same area where Cyclone Giri struck in 2010, killing about 45 people and destroying over 20,000 homes.

"The storm is potentially dangerous but it is still too early to say for sure," said Michael McGrath, country director for Save the Children in Bangladesh. "But strong winds and heavy rains could destroy homes and flatten crops at a time where the boro rice in Bangladesh is just ready for harvest. This could affect the source of income for many families, which could have devastating implications for their children such as dropping out of school to work."

Save the Children has responded to cyclones in both Bangladesh and Myanmar, most recently in Cyclone Giri that struck Rakhine State, Myanmar, in 2010.

"We have been informing children in our vulnerable program areas in Rakhine State about what to do during a cyclone including, staying close to their parents or guardians and seeking a safe, protected place with their families during the storm," said Kelland Stevenson, country director for Save the Children in Myanmar.

"Save the Children responded quickly and effectively to the needs of children and their families in the aftermath of Cyclone Giri in 2010, reaching over 135,000 people in our relief work. We have prepared emergency relief supplies so that our field offices in Sittwe and Chittagong will be able to respond swiftly to the needs of affected children and their families."

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

Making Change for Girls
After participating in the pilot project, boys exhibited greater support for girls to make their own decisions about marriage, participate in sports and go to school. Photo credit: Save the Children staff.

WASHINGTON, DC (May 13, 2013) — Boys who were presented alternative views of traditional roles of girls and women through a Save the Children pilot project in rural Egypt developed a more positive outlook on the role of girls. Research showed that boys at the end of the pilot had a lower tolerance for accepting violence against women and girls, and exhibited greater support for girls to make their own decisions about marriage, participate in sports, go out with their brothers outside the home and go to school.

"Boys can help shape how their families and communities view the role of girls in society," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children, who spoke at the "Making Change for Girls" #ChangeforGirls event in Washington, DC, where the research findings were presented. "As our research shows, by engaging boys at an early age, girls gain a strong advocate at home. Brothers can empower their sisters to plan their future and achieve their dreams. In years to come, we hope these boys will also do the same for their wives and daughters."

The pilot project, called Choices, was sponsored by the Nike Foundation. The research, gathered at the start and at the end of the pilot, measured changes in attitudes and behavior among adolescents who participated in the activities. The study was conducted among 100 girls and boys, ages 10 to 14, in four villages in Assiut and Beni Suef governorates.

Some of the key findings are:

  • Boys and girls who agree that a girl should have a say as to whom she chooses to marry have significantly increased from 84% to 92%. The percentage of boys who had no reaction to girls marrying young and to men chosen by their family has decreased from 18% to 2%.
  • Children are now more convinced that it's suitable for girls to do sports. The percentage of boys and girls who support girls doing sports activities increased from 34% to 49%.
  • In situations where parents oppose their daughter traveling outside the home unaccompanied, brothers became very supportive. Almost 60% of boys said they can accompany their sisters to where they need to go, compared to 44% of boys who supported this at the start of the activity. The percentage of boys willing to accompany their sisters to travel outside their home increased by 30%.
  • Boys and girls who agree that a brother can help his sister do household chores increased from 59% to 86%.
  • Boys and girls who agree that a brother can hit his sister has decreased from 51% to 27%.
  • Boys and girls who agree that a husband can hit his wife has decreased from 49% to 31%.
  • While children may agree that fathers have the right to hit their daughters, this attitude among boys and girls significantly decreased by 35 percent.

"Girls in rural area of Upper Egypt are extremely poor and feel isolated. They have restricted mobility, have had little to no schooling and marry young. This cycle has gone on for generations," said Basant Montaser, gender manager for Save the Children in Egypt who presented the Choices project at today's event. "Girls tell us they want their brothers to acknowledge their presence, ask how they are doing, joke with them and take them on errands. These seemingly small changes in behavior can make girls feel more valued at home, and can transform how girls see themselves and how others see them."

Montaser added, "We are already seeing small changes in deep-rooted attitudes and behavior among young adolescent boys within a short time. Boys now support their sisters with homework and chores, and take them out on errands. This gives us hope that we can help girls break social barriers and have a brighter future."

The Choices curriculum was first tested by Save the Children in Nepal in 2009. The curriculum engages parents, community members and children in a dialogue on various topics, such as how boys can be respected even if they treat girls as equals, how treating girls equally begins with small actions, and how boys and girls can express emotions and realize their hopes and dreams. Choices is being applied in other areas of Egypt, and being replicated in Ethiopia and Bolivia this year.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



The Bar on Food Aid Reform has been Raised. The Senate and House Must Act.

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Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

WASHINGTON, DC (May 10, 2013) — Save the Children, American Jewish World Service, Bread for the World, CARE, The Modernizing Assistance Network and Oxfam America released the following statement today in advance of the Senate and House committee mark-ups of the 2013 Farm Bill:

"With more than 870 million people suffering from hunger worldwide and Congress looking to ensure wise use of taxpayer funds at home, the 2013 Farm Bill represents a crucial opportunity to make our international food aid programs both more efficient and more cost-effective.

Unfortunately, the current Senate draft Farm Bill, due to be marked up next week, includes the same incremental steps toward reform as last year, but fails to address the fundamental changes that are so badly needed. We urge Senate leaders to work with the Administration to achieve stronger reforms in food aid programs so that American tax dollars can go farther and American compassion can reach more people in need. On the House side, we remain disappointed that the House Agriculture Committee draft once again fails to incorporate any reforms.

In his 2014 budget request, President Obama proposed common sense reforms that would feed millions more people and save lives by delivering aid faster with no additional cost to the taxpayer. This proposal sets an important precedent in building a more modern food aid program. Proposed reforms include allowing for greater flexibility in how the U.S. delivers food to hungry people overseas and ending the inefficient method of having aid groups sell food aid overseas to fund development programs, a practice known as "monetization." This increased flexibility is a part of a package that would allow food aid to go farther, feeding 2-4 million additional people. These reforms have been greeted with interest by members on both sides of the aisle.

While we are supporting the Administration's request that the FY 14 Appropriations bills be the vehicle for food aid reform, we recognize that there are several potential paths forward for Congress to achieve these much needed improvements to our international food aid program, and we are fully committed to working with leaders in Congress, including members of the House Foreign Affairs and Senate Foreign Relations Committees, to get it done this year."

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Celebrity Mom to Focus on Children's Needs in Crises

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Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

Photo by Justin Coit.
Photo by Justin Coit.

WESTPORT, Conn. (May 10, 2013) — Stylist and designer Rachel Zoe joins Save the Children as Artist Ambassador. In her new role, Zoe will raise awareness, mobilize funds and advocate for Save the Children's humanitarian response work in the United States and around the globe.

"We're delighted that Rachel is sharing the same contagious energy and passion she brings to fashion to helping children affected by natural disasters and conflict," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "Besides rallying supporters to do more, Rachel will work with Save the Children to help communities prepare to meet children's needs when another crisis like Superstorm Sandy hits."

"Save the Children has been helping children in need for nearly a hundred years, and I am extremely honored to be involved in their ongoing efforts and their commitment to disaster relief." said Zoe, mother of two-year-old son, Skyler.

Protecting Those Most Vulnerable During a Crisis: Moms and Newborns

The announcement comes just before Mother's Day and is part of Save the Children week-long effort to raise awareness about the inextricable link between the health and well-being of mothers and their newborns, and the silent global crisis of newborn deaths.

The first global analysis of newborn day-of-death data in the State of the World's Mothers report, released by Save the Children today, estimates that more than 1 million babies die the day they are born every year. Babies born in areas of conflict or natural disaster have a greater chance of not surviving their first day of life. The report also states that four underutilized health measures such as resuscitation devices to help babies breathe and injectable antibiotics to treat infections, costing between 13 cents and $6 each, could save one million newborns a year.

Rachel Zoe Joins Other Celebrities to Speak Up for Moms Everywhere

To celebrate the day a baby is born, Save the Children debuted a video featuring celebrity moms — Rachel Zoe, Jennifer Garner, Jennifer Connelly and Alyson Hannigan -- as well as everyday moms rejoicing in the magical first moments with their babies and wishing the same for all moms. View the video.

Recalling her own pregnancy and son's birth in Save the Children's First Moments video, Zoe said, "The process of any human being pushing another human being out of their body is a frightening thought. Let's be serious. But it's also the most extraordinary, incredible, beautiful thing that's ever happened [to me]."

Zoe added, "It's unfathomable that [newborn deaths] still exists today. We have to really unite and do everything we can to make this better."

To read the report and see the video, go to www.savethechildren.org/mothers

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)
Phil Carroll 202.640.6823 (O), 202.215.0638 (M)

LONDON (May 8, 2013) — An ambitious new partnership to save the lives of a million of the poorest children in the world has been launched by GSK and Save the Children. This unique collaboration will see the two organizations work together in a very different way, sharing expertise, resources, reach and influence to tackle some of the leading causes of childhood deaths.

Amongst the key initiatives are the transformation of an antiseptic used in mouthwash into a life-saving product for new-borns and the roll-out of a powder-form of an antibiotic in child friendly doses to help fight pneumonia - one of the main killers of children under five.

For the first time, Save the Children will be involved in helping GSK to research and develop medicines for children, with a seat on a new pediatric R&D board to accelerate progress on innovative life-saving interventions for under- fives, and to identify ways to ensure the widest possible access in the developing world. GSK will be able to leverage Save the Children's child health expertise and on-the- ground experience to reach children in the most remote and marginalized communities with basic healthcare.

The GSK-Save the Children partnership will also focus on widening vaccine coverage to the poorest children, increasing investment in health workers, as well as developing a low-cost nutritional product to help combat child malnutrition.

Flagship programs will run initially in Democratic Republic of Congo and Kenya. These will be closely monitored and the evidence on how to save children's lives at scale will be used to replicate programs in other countries within Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America.

While good progress has been made in recent years, almost seven million children died in 2011 through lack of access to basic healthcare, vaccines or nutritious food. Through these and other initiatives, the partnership aims to help save the lives of one million children in the next five years.

Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children U.S., said: "This ground breaking partnership involves both organizations working in genuinely new ways to save the lives of a million children. In the past Save the Children may not have embarked on a collaboration with a pharmaceutical company like GSK. But we believe we can make huge gains for children if we harness the power of GSK's innovation, research and global reach."

Sir Andrew Witty, CEO of GSK said: "A partnership of this scale gives us an opportunity to do something amazing – to save the lives of one million children and to transform the lives of millions more. At GSK we are motivated by developing innovative life-saving medicines and getting them to the people that need them. By joining forces with Save the Children, we can amplify these efforts to create a new momentum for change and stop children dying from preventable diseases. I hope this partnership inspires GSK employees and sets a new standard for how companies and NGOs can work together towards a shared goal."

Key features of the partnership are:

  • Reformulating the antiseptic chlorhexidine – found in GSK's Corsodyl mouth-wash – for cleansing the umbilical cord stump of new-borns to prevent serious infection, a major cause of newborn death in poor countries. Studies from South Asia suggest this simple intervention could prevent up to 1 in 6 new-born deaths in low resource settings.
  • Seeking the accelerated registration and roll-out of a child-friendly antibiotic, used to treat pneumonia – which currently kills 1.4 million under-fives, in countries with a high-incidence of the illness. This will be developed in dose packs suitable for small babies and young infants. GSK will also work with Save the Children to explore the reformulation of an alternative child-friendly version in places where access to water and milk is not easy.
  • Seeking to widen vaccination coverage to the hardest to reach communities: for example, through greater use of mobile technology solutions, sending SMS messages to remind parents to take up vaccination services and providing health workers and health facilities with smartphones to allow them to record and schedule vaccinations.
  • Researching a new affordable nutrition product combatting the scourge of malnutrition - the underlying cause of one in three deaths in under-fives. A joint GSK-Save the Children project team in Kenya is investigating the development of a low-cost nutritional product for the poorest families.
  • Investing in healthcare workers in the poorest communities, building on an existing GSK-Save the Children collaboration to help address the estimated shortfall of at least 3.5 million trained healthcare workers, who can deliver vaccines and essential medicines to babies and young children, provide health advice and treat malnutrition.
  • Building flagship country programs initially in Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Kenya to include these interventions, which will be closely monitored and evaluated to determine how the partnership is saving lives before scale-up and replication of the programs in other developing countries.
  • Developing a blueprint for how businesses can deliver better social outcomes by engaging with health and development issues and pursuing joint advocacy efforts to ensure a focus on children's health and wellbeing are maintained in global health policy discussions.
  • Inspiring and engaging GSK's global workforce to help raise awareness through volunteering and fundraising, with the ambition to encourage employees to raise £1 million a year, which will be matched by GSK. Through this and other charitable donations to Save the Children, GSK has committed to donate at least £15 million over the course of the partnership. Additional contributions will be made through specific research and development programs.

Save the Children and GSK have been working together for eight years on a number of public health projects, including GSK's initiative to reinvest 20 percent of the profits it makes in least-developed-countries in community programs to strengthen healthcare infrastructure, primarily through the training of community health workers.

GlaxoSmithKlineone of the world's leading research-based pharmaceutical and healthcare companies – is committed to improving the quality of human life by enabling people to do more, feel better and live longer. For further information please visit www.gsk.com.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Net Proceeds from Album Sales will Benefit Save the Children's HEART Program

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Eileen Burke 203.216.0718

World-renowned cellist Lynn Harrell and opera singer Jessye Norman, who recently collaborated with other artists to produce an album titled,
World-renowned cellist Lynn Harrell and opera singer Jessye Norman, who recently collaborated with other artists to produce an album titled, "We'll Paint You a Rainbow," with proceeds going to the HEARTbeats Foundation and Save the Children's HEART program.

WESTPORT, Conn. (May 9, 2013) — World-renowned cellist Lynn Harrell and his wife, violinist Helen Nightengale, have assembled an unprecedented group of celebrated music stars to record the recently released album titled, We'll Paint You a Rainbow, to benefit Save the Children's art education and therapy programs. Paul Simon, Joan Baez, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Jessye Norman, Christine Brewer, John Williams, the Blind Boys of Alabama, and Harrell are just a few of the musicians who have given their time and talents to record for the album.

Serving as artist ambassadors for the international nonprofit Save the Children's Healing and Education through the Arts, or HEART program, Harrell and Nightengale were determined to do something that would give hope and the promise of a future to at-risk children everywhere.

"The beautiful collection of classics and new songs that are on We'll Paint You a Rainbow were recorded by some of the most revered names in classical and contemporary music," said Lynn Harrell.

"All of these great artists donated their time and talent, in order to help transform the lives of at-risk children through music," said Helen Nightengale. "And we are so grateful to them and their ability to inspire all of us to make change."

Produced by the HEARTbeats Foundation and Nightengale Records, We'll Paint You a Rainbow's 13 tracks offer songs about children and peace. INgrooves Fontana is distributing the digital album, at a variety of online vendors including iTunes and Amazon.com for $9.99 with separate tracks at 99 cents each. A physical CD is available for purchase at www.HeartbeatsForChildren.org. The CD is accompanied by a 20-page full color informational booklet that includes photos and lyrics.

Net proceeds from We'll Paint You a Rainbow will be donated to the HEARTbeats Foundation and to Save the Children's HEART program, which brings the proven power of artistic expression through drawing, painting, music, drama, dance and more to some of the world's most vulnerable children. Save the Children has HEART programs in Haiti, Malawi, Mozambique and Nepal, and is slated to start programs in Ethiopia, Jordan and the West Bank in 2013. To learn more, go here.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Presents Key Findings from 2013 State of the World's Mothers Report

Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children and Dr. Joy Lawn, Senior Newborn Health Advisor at Save the Children together at Mom+Social.
Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children and Dr. Joy Lawn, Senior Newborn Health Advisor at Save the Children together at Mom+Social.

Media Contact
Phil Carroll 202.215.0638 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (May 8, 2013) — Save the Children's president and CEO, Carolyn Miles, delivered the keynote address today at the first annual Mom+Social conference, where she presented the findings of the agency's 2013 State of the World's Mothers report. Leading bloggers, celebrities and activists gathered at the 92YTribeca in New York City for this all-day event focused on motherhood and the role of social media, technology and philanthropy to improve the health of moms and children everywhere.

"Digital media and technology are becoming increasingly powerful tools to improve the health of moms and their babies," Miles said. "I'm thrilled that Mom+Social gives us all a platform to do just that."

Miles shared the stage with such luminaries as Jennifer Lopez, Christy Turlington, Ann Curry and Mrs. Ban Soon-Taek, spouse of the UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon.

Miles participated in Mom+Social the day after the launch of Save the Children's 14th annual State of the World's Mothers Report. The report, "Surviving the First Day," estimates that every year more than 1 million babies die on the day they are born, making a baby's birth day the most dangerous day of life—in the United States and almost every country in the world.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



From left, Save the Children President & CEO Carolyn Miles, H.E. Dr. Mwaba Kasese-Bota, a UN representative from Zambia, and Dr. Joy Lawn, lead author of SOWM report, at the launch briefing of Save the Children's State of the World's Mothers Report at the United Nations.
From left, Save the Children President & CEO Carolyn Miles, H.E. Dr. Mwaba Kasese-Bota, a UN representative from Zambia, and Dr. Joy Lawn, lead author of SOWM report, at the launch briefing of Save the Children's State of the World's Mothers Report at the United Nations.

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

NEW YORK (May 7, 2013) — The launch of Save the Children's 14th annual State of the World's Mothers report at the United Nations today marked a growing global focus on newborn babies. The morning event was cohosted by the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Zambia to the United Nations.

According to the new report, themed "Surviving the First Day," every year more than 1 million babies die on the day they are born, making a baby's birth day the most dangerous day of life—in the United States and almost every country in the world.

"It was here at the U.N. that all countries agreed to the Millennium Development Goal to reduce child mortality by two thirds," said Carolyn Miles , President & CEO of Save the Children. "We've come a long way, but we won't get there without new focus on saving the youngest lives. This report presents the growing evidence that the world today has the low-cost tools to prevent millions of newborn deaths once considered inevitable."

The report includes a new Birth Day Risk Index that ranks 186 countries by the chances a baby will die on the first day of life. The United States is a riskier place to be born than 68 other countries, according to the new analysis.

In addition, the report also features Save the Children's Mothers' Index. This year, it ranks Finland as the best place in the world to be a mother, and Democratic Republic of the Congo as the toughest. The United States ranks as the 30th best place to be a mother.





Speakers included:

  • Carolyn Miles, President & CEO, Save the Children
  • Professor Joy Lawn, Director, MARCH Centre, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; Senior Health Advisor to Save the Children
  • Ambassador Dr. Mwaba Kasese-Bota, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Zambia to the UN
  • Dr. Kim Eva Dickson, Senior Adviser, Maternal and Newborn Health, UNICEF
  • Catherine Ojo, Chief Nursing Officer (Registered Nurse, Registered Midwife and Paediatric Nurse), Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Kaduna State, Nigeria

Learn more and take action at www.savethechildren.org/mothers.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



More U.S. babies die on birth day than in rest of industrialized world

Harriet, from Uganda, holds her 6-day-old baby, Pius, who was not breathing when he was born. Photo by Suzanna Klaucke.
Harriet, from Uganda, holds her 6-day-old baby, Pius, who was not breathing when he was born. Photo by Suzanna Klaucke.
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

 

WESTPORT, Conn. (May 7, 2013) —A baby's birth day is the most dangerous day of life—in the United States and almost every country in the world—according Save the Children's State of the World's Mothers report, released today.

More than 1 million babies die the day they are born yearly, according to the first global analysis of newborn day-of-death data.

In addition to new findings on newborn survival, the report also features Save the Children's Mothers' Index, released annually in the run-up to Mother's Day. This year it ranks Finland as the best place in the world to be a mother, and Democratic Republic of the Congo as the toughest.

The United States ranks as the 30th best place to be a mother, just above Japan and South Korea—but below all of Western Europe, Australia, Slovenia, Singapore, New Zealand, Estonia, Canada, Czech Republic, Israel, Belarus, Lithuania and Poland. The Mothers' Index rankings are determined by five indicators on education, income, women's political representation and the chances a mother and her baby will survive.

Surviving the First Day

The 2013 State of the World's Mothers report focuses in on newborn health and the theme "Surviving the First Day." A new Birth Day Risk Index ranks 186 countries by the chances a baby will die on the first day of life.

The United States is a riskier place to be born than 68 other countries, according to the new analysis conducted by Save the Children and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

In the industrialized world, the United States has 60 percent of all first-day deaths, but only 38 percent of live births. Approximately 11,300 U.S. babies died on the first day of life in 2011, the report says. Some U.S. counties have first-day death rates common in the developing world, where 98 percent of all first-day deaths occur.

"It's hard to imagine the depth of one mother's pain in losing her baby the very day she gives birth, let alone a million times over," said Carolyn Miles , President & CEO of Save the Children. "Yet, this report is full of hope. It shows there is a growing movement to save newborn lives and growing evidence that we can do it—saving up to 75 percent of them with no intensive care whatsoever."

As Child Mortality Drops, Newborns Left Behind

Since 1990, overall child mortality has dropped dramatically around the world, from 12 million annual deaths to less than 7 million. But the report shows that lack of global attention on newborns has translated into a much slower decline in newborn mortality. In sub-Saharan Africa, as many newborns die now as two decades ago.

Globally, a rising share of child deaths—43 percent—now occur in the newborn period, or first month of life. The new report finds that more than a third of newborn deaths, or 15 percent of all child deaths, occur on the same day—the first.

The three leading causes of newborn death are prematurity, birth complications and severe infections. Among wealthier countries, higher U.S. rates of prematurity contribute to higher newborn mortality. Whether in the United States or the developing world, the poorest mothers are more likely to lose a newborn baby, the report finds.

The largest numbers of first-day deaths occur in India (more than 300,000 a year) and Nigeria (almost 90,000). The report identifies Somalia as the country with the highest first-day death rate (18 per 1,000 live births), while Luxemburg, Singapore and Sweden have among the lowest (less than 0.5 per 1,000).

New Hope for Newborns

A new Save the Children analysis shows that four underutilized products costing between 13 cents and $6 each could save 1 million newborns a year—many on the first day of life. They are: resuscitation devices to help babies breathe; the antiseptic chlorhexidine to prevent umbilical cord infections; injectable antibiotics to treat infections; and antenatal steroid injections to help preterm babies' lungs develop.

Other factors the report says will save more newborns are: early and exclusive breastfeeding, "kangaroo mother care" to keep preterm babies warm against their mothers' skin, and skilled attendance at birth (40 million women a year now go without). Addressing the global health worker crisis is key, as is investing in girls and women. Their improved nutrition and empowerment to attend school, delay marriage and plan and space births all lead to healthier mothers and babies.

Celebrities Speak up for Moms Everywhere

Save the Children also debuted a video of celebrity and everyday moms celebrating the magical first moments with their babies and wishing the same for all moms.

"I'm grateful for the midwives who delivered my three children," Save the Children Artist Ambassador Jennifer Connelly says in the video. "I hope that pregnant women everywhere are given the opportunity to give birth safely."

Save the Children Artist Ambassador Jennifer Garner says, "Even with all of the care I had, even with monitoring the babies all the way through, I still had fears. So it's hard not to think about women who don't have all of that care, and how scared they must be."

The State of the World's Mothers report highlights several very poor countries making great strides to save newborns—including Nepal, Bangladesh, Malawi and Ethiopia—and calls on all nations to act for mothers and babies.

See the full rankings, learn more and take action at www.savethechildren.org/mothers .

Media can find Save the Children's multimedia release on the State of the World’s Mothers report here .

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Jeremy Soulliere 203.341.8203 (O) 203.295.5842 (M)

Neighbors peruse through goods for sale at the annual Daum family tag sale. Without all the generously donated goods from neighbors and members of the community, we wouldn't have a sale, said Michelle Daum. It's an amazing community effort. Photo by Michelle Daum.
Neighbors peruse through goods for sale at the annual Daum family tag sale. "Without all the generously donated goods from neighbors and members of the community, we wouldn't have a sale," said Michelle Daum. "It's an amazing community effort." Photo by Michelle Daum.

LARCHMONT, N.Y. (May 6, 2013) — From used tires to a backyard ice rink, one local family has been selling one tag sale item at a time since 2000 to change children's lives around the world.

The Daum family of Larchmont is set to put on its annual community tag sale for Save the Children on Saturday, May 11, and over the years has raised more than $125,000 for the global relief and development organization.

"We are incredibly grateful to the Daum family's commitment over the years to making the world a better place for children," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "They have come up with the perfect combination. Tag sale lovers can get a good find and do good at the same time."

According to Michelle Daum, it all began 15 years ago when her daughter Carly, then 13 years old, generously donated to Save the Children all the gifts she received for her bat mitzvah (about $15,000) — and then the family took a trip to see Carly's donation at work. So moved by what they experienced — watching little children from remote coal-mining communities deep in Appalachia benefitting from Save the Children's education programs — the family decided to do more. And they did.

The following year, the Daums organized the first of many community tag sales in their hometown, raising $3,000 which they donated to Save the Children. Growing steadily over the years, the Daum family tag sale has become a huge annual event, and the family was able to donate $17,000 after last year's sale to help change children's lives.

"Without all the generously donated goods from neighbors and members of the community, we wouldn't have a sale," said Michelle Daum. "It's an amazing community effort. I feel moved by it."

Michelle Daum, left, talks with a mother and child as she visits Save the Children programming in Ethiopia. The programs we have seen in the field have been deeply inspiring. They reach the children in need with the provision of basic tools, such as a loan of $150 to a mother to begin a weaving business so that she can support her children, said Daum. Over the years, the Daum family has raised more than $125,000 for Save the Children programs. Photo by Save the Children
Michelle Daum, left, talks with a mother and child as she visits Save the Children programming in Ethiopia. "The programs we have seen in the field have been deeply inspiring. They reach the children in need with the provision of basic tools, such as a loan of $150 to a mother to begin a weaving business so that she can support her children," said Daum. Over the years, the Daum family has raised more than $125,000 for Save the Children programs. Photo by Save the Children.

Over the past 15 years, the Daum family has had the opportunity to work with the staff at Save the Children, both at the Westport Offices and in the field, as far away as Ethiopia and Vietnam.

"The programs we have seen in the field have been deeply inspiring. They reach the children in need with the provision of basic tools, such as a loan of $150 to a mother to begin a weaving business so that she can support her children," said Michelle Daum. "We have observed the work of community health workers who have been taught to assess the health of newborns and alert medical staff when a baby or child is in critical need of care. The Save the Children staff in the field and the families who are reached by Save the Children welcomed us into their communities and homes. Save the Children continually devises new, thoughtful, smart and simple solutions that greatly benefit the lives of children everywhere."

Proceeds from this year's tag sale — which runs from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on May 11 at 54 Beach Ave. in Larchmont — will be donated to Save the Children's emergency relief programming in the U.S.

"Each year, Save the Children allows us the opportunity to choose which programs will receive the tag sale funds," said Michelle Daum. "In years past, we have designated both domestic and international programs, including Appalachia, Katrina recovery, micro-finance in Latin America, and most recently, Every Beat Matters, an international program to lower maternal and infant mortality. This year, due to the overwhelming events so close to home and the immediate support from Save the Children in both Newtown, Connecticut and during Hurricane Sandy, we have chosen to designate the tag sale funds for domestic emergency relief."

Very appreciative of the fund designation for this year's tag sale, Carolyn Miles said the proceeds will go toward critical Save the Children programming. "As we saw this past year with Superstorm Sandy and the tragedy in Newtown, children are especially vulnerable during times of crisis. The funds raised from this year's tag sale will help us work with communities, schools and parents to respond quickly and immediately to children's specific needs during future emergencies," she said.

For further information on the tag sale, email Michelle Daum at mdaum5@gmail.com or go to www.savethechildren.org/daum-tagsale , where visitors can help contribute donations to the Daum Family Tag Sale and Save the Children.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contact(s)
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WASHINGTON, D.C. (May 2, 2013) — As new figures reveal that 130,000 children under the age of five died in 2011's Somali famine and its aftermath, Save the Children has warned that the humanitarian situation for children in the country remains extremely serious.

Despite an improvement in food security since the peak of the famine, children continue to die because they don't have enough to eat. Save the Children is calling on the international community to maintain focus on combatting hunger in the war-torn country.

"These figures clearly show how children bear brunt of hunger crises. 130,000 children under the age of five lost their lives in a crisis that was predicted months in advance. We must never let that happen again, and we must recommit to helping the 2.7 million Somalis who remain in crisis," said Carolyn Miles, president & CEO of Save the Children. "While conditions in Somalia have improved in recent months, the country still has one of the highest rates of child malnutrition and infant mortality in the world."

"With next week's London Conference on Somalia, this is a timely reminder to the international community of the urgent need to refocus on the humanitarian situation in Somalia."

Last year, Save the Children and Oxfam launched A Dangerous Delay, a report that showed how the international community's slow response to the famine cost tens of thousands of lives. Save the Children continues to work across Somalia, providing life-saving assistance to the most vulnerable and helping families to strengthen their resistance to future shocks.

How You Can Help

Your generous donation to our East Africa Food Crisis Relief Fund will help us provide food, water, education, child care and so much more for children and families affected by the food crisis.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Save the Children Teams Up with Leading Children’s Apparel Manufacturer to Help Mothers Better Prepare Their Children to Learn in School

Media Contacts
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171
Tanya Coventry-Strader 404.576.7518

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 26, 2013) — In celebration of Mother’s Day, Save the Children has joined forces with Carter’s to help less fortunate Moms in America give their babies a better start in life.

From April 27-May 12, through its 100,000 Ways to Celebrate Moms Campaign, launched in partnership with Save the Children’s Early Steps to School Success Program, Carter’s stores and carters.com will be accepting monetary donations to give Moms the best Mother’s Day gift of all, the support they need to prepare their children to succeed in school. Carter’s will match all customer donations during this time up to $100,000.
 
Carter’s believes that childhood should be a celebration and looks for opportunities to help nurture and protect children and build communities in which children can thrive.  Whether providing clean and comfortable clothing, sending volunteers into classrooms, or empowering others to help children in need, Carter’s works to make children's lives easier so they can be free to do what they do best – enjoy childhood.

Statistics on Early Childhood Education

Through innovative partnerships with government entities and local schools coupled with generous support from corporations such as Carter’s, Save the Children helps give infants, toddlers and preschoolers in underserved, poverty-stricken communities across 17 states an equal chance to rise above their challenging circumstances.

  • Experts tell us 90% of brain development occurs before the age of 5, laying the groundwork for future learning potential[1]
  • Children without access to quality early education programs start school with an 18-month disadvantage and that gap continues to widen[2]
  • Every $1 invested in early childhood education can save $7 in the long term[3]
  • 83 percent of disadvantaged 3-year-olds in Save the Children programs, who were at risk of falling behind their peers, now score at or above the normal range for vocabulary acquisition and will enter school ready to learn

About Save the Children

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

About Carter's, Inc.

Carter's, Inc. is the largest branded marketer in the United States of apparel and related products exclusively for babies and young children. The Company owns the Carter's and OshKosh B'gosh brands, two of the most recognized brands in the marketplace. These brands are sold in leading department stores, national chains, and specialty retailers domestically and internationally. They are also sold through more than 600 Company-operated stores in the United States, Canada, and Japan and on-line at www.carters.com and www.oshkoshbgosh.com. The Company's Just One You, Precious Firsts, and Genuine Kids brands are available at Target, and its Child of Mine brand is available at Walmart. Carter's is headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia. Additional information may be found at www.carters.com.

[1] 'Teaching with the Brain in Mind', Eric Jensen and the Early Childhood Initiative Foundation of Miami
[2] Starting School at a Disadvantage: The School Readiness of Poor Children, Center on Children and Families at the Brookings Institute
[3] Age 21 Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Title I Chicago Child-Parent Center Program, Dr. Arthur Reynolds of the University of Wisconsin



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153 (M)

Save the Children is already responding to the Sichuan earthquake. Here a truck has just been loaded with plastic sheeting and hygiene kits. Photo Credi: Save the Children

Save the Children is already responding to the Sichuan earthquake. Here a truck has just been loaded with plastic sheeting and hygiene kits. Photo Credit: Save the Children

Voices From the Field
"Children most vulnerable in the aftermath of Sichuan earthquake" by Fan Xiaowen Read the blog.

"I hope to have a space to play with other children here" by Fan Xiaowen Read the blog.

China Earthquake 2013 Children in Emergency Fund

BEIJING (Apr. 21, 2013) — A 7.0 magnitude earthquake rocked the Sichuan province of China on Saturday morning, killing 186 and leaving thousands injured.

Many buildings in the area have toppled and roads blocked due to debris and landslides. The government has sent in search and rescue crew as well as medical officers to help those injured in the temblor. The epicenter is close to the devastating quake in 2008 that killed nearly 70,000 people and left 4.8 million people homeless.

"Save the Children responded to the 2008 earthquake in Sichuan, providing life-saving aid and building baby care centers and classrooms for kindergarten children. A year later, we started a disaster preparedness and risk reduction program for families in Sichuan, working with teachers, students and communities to prepare for and reduce the impact of future disasters such as these," said Pia MacRae, country director for Save the Children in China.

"Save the Children"s field office in Chengdu will assess the situation in Ya’an Prefecture where most of the damage has been recorded and will respond to the needs of affected children and their families accordingly. We are especially concerned about young children as they are always vulnerable in emergency situations with the possibility of being separated from their parents as they may not know where to go or what to do. Many aftershocks have been recorded and we are expecting more to come."

Save the Children has been working in China for two decades, responding to over 17 disasters in that time, such as the 2010 Yushu earthquake and 2008 Sichuan earthquake; and more recently the 2012 twin earthquakes in Yiliang and Zhaoyang Counties (Yunnan Province).

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Jeremy Soulliere 203.341.8203 (O) 203.295.5842 (M)
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

U.S. Rep. James McGovern (D-MA), right, receives Save the Children's Congressional Champion for Real and Lasting Change Award from Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. Photo by Susan Warner.
U.S. Rep. James McGovern (D-MA), right, receives Save the Children's Congressional Champion for Real and Lasting Change Award from Carolyn Miles, President and CEO of Save the Children. Photo by Susan Warner.

WASHINGTON, DC (April 12, 2013) — Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Congressmen James McGovern (D-MA) and Steny Hoyer (D-MD) were applauded this week for their leadership and extraordinary commitment to children around the world, as Save the Children honored each of the three legislators with its 2013 Congressional Champion for Real and Lasting Change Award.

"Sen. Graham and Congressmen McGovern and Hoyer have shown unwavering support and leadership in shaping a world where children have an opportunity to fulfill their full potential and improve the future," said Carolyn Miles, Save the Children president and CEO.

Graham, McGovern and Hoyer were presented with their awards during Save the Children's Advocacy Summit on Capitol Hill, which, for more than 10 years, has mobilized individuals from across the country to lend their voice on behalf of children in need in the U.S. and around the world.

Graham has supported an international affairs budget that helps to ensure children are safe, healthy and educated, and live in economically and food secure households. He has also been dedicated to the issue of global health and highlighting the importance of frontline health workers, who are the first and often the only point of contact to the health-care system for millions of people in the developing world.

U.S. Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD), left, receives Save the Children's Congressional Champion for Real and Lasting Change Award from Mark Shriver, senior vice president for Strategic Initiatives at Save the Children.
U.S. Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD), left, receives Save the Children's Congressional Champion for Real and Lasting Change Award from Mark Shriver, Senior Vice President for Strategic Initiatives at Save the Children. Photo by Susan Warner.

McGovern's work on the reauthorization of the U.S. child nutrition bill, as well as on the development and implementation of the "Roadmap to End Global Hunger" has been instrumental in reducing hunger and increasing food security. He also has been a consistent champion in obtaining funding for the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program, helping to support education, child development, and food security for some of the world's poorest children.

"I believe that many of the problems facing children in need in the U.S. and around the world — especially hunger — are the result of a lack of political will to find a solution," said McGovern. "Save the Children does remarkable work advocating for children whose voices often go unheard, and I am incredibly humbled by this award."

For more than 30 years, Hoyer has demonstrated a profound commitment to supporting child-focused programs, including Head Start, the Child Care and Development Block Grant, and the Children's Health Insurance Program. Additionally, in the wake of the tragedy in Newtown, Conn., he provided sound leadership on the need for the country to prioritize the safety of children.

"I am honored to receive the Congressional Champion for Real and Lasting Change Award from Save the Children, an organization leading the effort to improve and protect children's lives around the world," said Hoyer. "Children are our future, and I have been proud to support programs and funding critical to youth development and especially early childhood education. It is our responsibility to invest in our children's health, education, well-being and safety, so that even the most vulnerable families and children have the opportunity to thrive. I will continue to work in Congress to ensure that all children have the resources and support they need to lead healthy, full and prosperous lives."

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Philip Carroll 202.640.6823 (O), 202.215.0638 (M)

WASHINGTON, DC (April 11, 2013) — Nine outstanding health workers were honored today in Washington, DC for their extraordinary service in healthcare. The REAL Awards presentation, which took place on Capitol Hill, featured Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Ambassador Jimmy Kolker, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Global Affairs at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The nine U.S.-based honorees named below include a home healthcare worker who sprang into action after a tornado devastated her Kentucky community, a heart surgeon who travels the world to perform lifesaving surgery on children and an obstetrician who's delivered more than 6,000 babies.

  • Kathryn M. Tschiegg (General health care), Orrville, OH
  • Dr. Beth Dupree (Chronic disease care), Southampton, PA
  • Dr. William Novick (Pediatric care), Memphis, TN
  • Dr. Robert Clifford (Pediatric care), Charleston, SC
  • Carri Butcher (Hospice care), Flippin, AR
  • Melissa Courtney (Newborn and mother care), Lexington, KY
  • Dr. Joseph Tate (Newborn and mother care), Norcross, GA
  • Donn Kropp (Emergency care), Redding, CA
  • Rhonda Dixon (At-home care), West Liberty, KY

These recipients join 10 global honorees from Africa and Asia who are being honored in their home countries over the next several weeks. Two of the global winners — Dr. Ashish Satav and and Rekha Bangarwawere — celebrated in India today as part of that country's Safe Motherhood Day.

"I am honored to be here today to celebrate the inspiring work of these inaugural REAL Award winners," said Mary Beth Powers, chief of the newborn and child survival campaign at Save the Children. "Their exceptional service to others deserves to be recognized not just today, but every day."

The awards presentation coincides with World Health Worker Week, which aims to mobilize communities, partners and policymakers in support of health workers all across the globe.

By some estimates, the world is short more than 5 million health workers, including one million frontline health workers. The U.S. alone is estimated to be short about 16,000 primary care doctors, a number that is expected to swell to 45,000 by 2020.

The public can read the inspirational stories of the international and domestic REAL Awards honorees at www.theREALawards.com.

About the REAL Awards

The REAL Awards, created by Save the Children in partnership with the Frontline Health Workers Coalition, is a first-of-its-kind global awards program designed to develop greater respect and appreciation for health workers and the lifesaving care they provide globally, as well as in the United States. The REAL Awards is made possible by the support of presenting sponsors Medtronic Foundation, Merck Foundation, and Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation and Competition in Healthcare.

About Save the Children

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Statement by Mark Shriver, Senior Vice President, Save the Children

Media Contact
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 9, 2013) — President Obama has rightly put a stake in the ground on the issue of early childhood education. In his State of the Union Address, the President called on Congress to "make high-quality preschool available to every single child in America."

In his fiscal year 2014 budget, scheduled to be released tomorrow, the President is expected to back up his call by proposing to expand grants to states to help impoverished children gain access to early childhood education. To pay for this initiative, the President will propose to increase the federal taxes on tobacco products.

This is sound policy.

We know that tobacco harms health. The science is clear.

We know that an investment in early childhood education is a critical means of breaking the cycle of poverty. The economics are clear. What we need now is the will to move this initiative.

Save the Children believes that an investment in early childhood education is one of the few areas in which we have bipartisan, cross-sector support for a clear method of alleviating poverty in America.

We stand by President Obama's administration on this initiative. The time to act is now.

About Save the Children

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

You can be a voice for children. Join the #SaveKids conversation and learn about Save the Children's 2013 Advocacy Summit: savethechildren.org/advocacy



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (April 9, 2013) — Children make up the majority of victims of sexual violence in many conflict and post-conflict zones, according to a new report released by Save the Children ahead of a crucial G8 meeting in London aimed at tackling the issue.

In the new report Unspeakable Crimes Against Children, Save the Children has collated figures and testimonies from a range of countries affected by conflict over the past decade, including Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia and Colombia.

Reliable data on the issue is limited, as much sexual abuse goes unreported, but taken together, the figures collated in the report indicate that children frequently make up the majority of sexual abuse victims in war and its aftermath.

For example, a study in Liberia – still recovering from a vicious civil war that ended a decade ago – found that more than 80 percent of victims of gender-based violence in 2011-12 were younger than 17. Almost all of them were raped.

Among testimonies gathered from victims and witnesses for the report, Save the Children heard of children being killed after being raped, both girls and boys kidnapped and abused by armed forces and groups, and children as young as two-years-old being attacked by opportunistic sexual predators, including teachers, religious leaders, peacekeepers, and family members.

Despite this, programs to prevent children falling victim to sexual violence and help them recover from attacks remain chronically underfunded. The most recent complete global figures show that less than a quarter of the budget needed to protect children and women in emergencies was available.

"It is shocking that in conflict zones around the world, children — especially young girls — are being raped and abused at such an appalling rate. Sexual violence is one of the hidden horrors of war and the damage it wreaks ruins lives," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children.

"Even if they recover from the physical effects of their experiences, many victims carry the psychological scars of their ordeal for the rest of their lives, and are often cast out from society. Despite all this, there are huge gaps in funding for the work needed to protect children from these atrocious crimes and to respond to their needs."

Testimonies of witnesses and victims of sexual violence in conflict and post-conflict settings around the world reveal the devastating impact such incidents have on children's lives:

  • "Rebels were raping women, they took two girls: one was 13 and the other was 14. Then they took a 15-year-old. There were 15 or 16 [men]. The one who was 13 died because they beat her so badly." Barakissa, aged 29, describing the abduction and rape of young girls in Mali, 2012
  • "I still remember the day when I was raped the first time. I was raped three times that night. I wanted to escape from them but didn't get a chance." Aditya, remembering the 3 years she spent (from the age of 13) captive of the Maoist militias in Nepal
  • "It was horrible. My daughter got sick because she had been injured by what the man had done when he molested her." Maria, recounting the medical effects after the rape of her five–year-old daughter Diana in Colombia.

During its leadership of the G8, the UK government has vowed to prioritize the issue of sexual violence in conflict. Save the Children is calling on G8 leaders to take the following concrete actions to help children who are affected:

  • Fund child protection in emergencies to make sure that vulnerable children are kept safe and given help to recover from their experiences.
  • Ensure that programs aimed at dealing with sexual violence in conflict zones are focused on children, who often make up the majority of survivors.
  • End impunity for sexual violence against children, making sure that those responsible are brought to account.
  • Ensure that the UN has the resources and mandate to put measures in place to effectively protect children in conflicts.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

You can be a voice for children. Join the #SaveKids conversation and learn about Save the Children's 2013 Advocacy Summit: savethechildren.org/advocacy



Agency Teams Up with Other NGOs In Support of Reform Efforts

Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (April 9, 2013) — Save the Children welcomes President Obama's proposal to reform U.S. international food assistance programs and urges U.S. lawmakers to ensure that these programs continue to reach the world's poorest and most vulnerable children.

President Barack Obama is expected to include elements of food assistance reform in his budget request for fiscal year 2014 on Wednesday. In anticipation of this announcement, leading NGOs that help carry out U.S. food assistance around the world, including Save the Children, have agreed on a set of principles to help guide efforts to reform U.S. food assistance programs.

"For nearly 60 years, the U.S. government has been a world leader in helping millions of hungry and malnourished children in the face of crisis and chronic food insecurity," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "We are confident that will not change. The President's proposed food aid reforms have the potential to help us reach even more children in need by making U.S. international food assistance programs more flexible, timely and cost-effective."

"These reforms must ensure that people who suffer from acute and chronic hunger are still the focal point of any U.S. food assistance programs," said Samuel A. Worthington, president and CEO of InterAction, a coalition of more than 180 U.S.-based humanitarian and aid organizations. "An estimated one in seven people are hungry at any time — while about 100 million people endure severe hunger crises each year. Any reforms should have their best interests at heart."

The principles call for an increase in the number of people helped by U.S. food assistance, which has declined significantly in recent years due to decreases in funding and higher commodity prices and distribution costs. In order to reach more hungry people, food assistance programs must also allow for more flexible use of tools such as cash transfers, food vouchers and the local procurement of goods alongside provision of U.S. commodities and direct program funding.

"InterAction member NGOs, with support from generous American donors, are on the frontlines of tackling hunger. It is critical to involve civil society in the reform process, to ensure these programs are as effective as they can be in reaching the most poor and vulnerable," Worthington said.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



As Budget Debate Continues, Organization Urges Congress to Invest in, Not Cut, Programs Benefitting Children at Home and Around the World

Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

WASHINGTON, D.C (April 10, 2013) — Save the Children welcomes President Obama's budget, which balances strategic investments with fiscal discipline and key reforms. This approach will be essential as the budget process moves forward, the development and humanitarian organization said.

"There are some real bright spots in the president's budget. We see smart investments in early learning for kids in America and in health for kids around the world that will pay off in the long term. But there's a real risk that the budget cuts of the last three years — if they continue — will erode the overall safety net for kids and families. And quite frankly, as the budget debate moves to Congress, we're concerned," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children.

"As Americans, we need to speak up more for these programs. We need to be the voice for kids and protect effective, proven programs that will give children everywhere a brighter future and pay for themselves in the long run," she said.

International Affairs

Save the Children, while applauding the request, expressed grave concern that as the budget process moves forward, sequestration could bring continued cuts to lifesaving programs around the world. This would essentially balancing the budget on the backs of poor children, Save the Children warned. International affairs funding represents only about 1 percent of the federal budget.

But, the organization noted, these critical investments in a more stable and prosperous world have already been cut by 19 percent from Fiscal Year 2010 levels, when excluding war-related expenses.

The Fiscal Year 2014 budget flat lines this spending from current year's enacted levels. Further cuts would jeopardize a number of important investments the president has put forth in his budget request.

Save the Children applauds the President's consistent commitment to maintaining robust investments in Global Health overall, and specifically for Maternal and Child Health, which are essential to meeting his bold goal from the State of the Union of ending preventable child deaths within a generation. In one of the greatest global health success stories, the world has lowered child mortality by more than 40 percent since 1990. But nearly 20,000 children under 5 still die every day, mostly of preventable causes. Investments in global maternal and child health and nutrition programs directly impact the most vulnerable victims of poverty and instability.

Save the Children also commended the President's continued commitment to tackle global hunger and malnutrition through Feed the Future, the 1,000 Days initiative and other programs. The organization welcomed the President's bold efforts to reform international food assistance.

"Especially in these tight times, we need to ensure that we're reaching as many vulnerable kids as possible with effective programs that fight hunger and malnutrition," said Miles. "The President's proposed food aid reforms have the potential to help us reach even more children in need by making U.S. international food assistance more flexible, timely and cost-effective."

"U.S. humanitarian and development programs have a huge impact on kids' lives around the world, but a negligible impact on the overall budget. We need to protect these small but essential investments", said Miles.

Save the Children was encouraged by the US Government's continuing commitment to the Syria crisis and the vital contribution of $385 million to humanitarian assistance. "The US Government's leadership of international efforts to bring an end to the suffering of children and their families during the Syrian crisis greatly appreciated," said Miles.

The investments in the president's budget clearly recognize the important role foreign assistance plays in advancing U.S. national security and economic interests. Currently, roughly half of US exports go to developing countries.

U.S. Domestic Programs

Save the Children commended the president's budget for demonstrating a powerful commitment to building a bright future for American children. In his domestic budget, the president continued his commitment to ensuring access to quality education for all children by proposing a new, $750 million early education initiative.

In addition, President Obama has kept his promise in the wake of the tragic school shooting in Newtown on improving security in schools with a $112 million proposal to help develop and implement quality emergency preparedness plans. It also includes a new investment of $130 million to help recognize signs of mental illness in young people by providing needed services, such as counseling; to improve mental health services for people ages 16-25; and to train 5,000 more mental health professionals with a focus on serving students and young adults.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Babies"R"Us® Adds Limited Edition T-Shirts to its Truly Scrumptious by Heidi Klum Collection in Support of Save the Children; Launches Nationwide T-Shirt Design Contest for Kids

Babies'R'Us® Adds Limited Edition T-Shirts to its Truly Scrumptious by Heidi Klum Collection in Support of Save the Children; Launches Nationwide T-Shirt Design Contest for Kids

Media Contacts
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)
Kerry Smith, Toys"R"Us, 973.617.4380 (M)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 4, 2013) — In partnership with Save the Children, Babies"R"Us® is introducing specially designed t-shirts as part of the company's exclusive Truly Scrumptious by Heidi Klum collection to help inspire creativity among kids. In conjunction with this initiative, Babies"R"Us® has donated $50,000 to Save the Children's programs benefitting young children in impoverished regions around the country. The fun, monster-themed t-shirts for kids, sizes newborn to 5T, were designed by Johan, 6-year-old son of world-renowned fashion icon and mom of four Heidi Klum. The t-shirts are now available online and rolling into Babies"R"Us® stores nationwide next week.

Save the Children has a long history of showcasing the creativity of children through their artwork and has implemented various art contests over the years to encourage youth to show their support for those in need through design, while raising awareness and funds for the organization's ongoing mission. Inspired by Save the Children's licensed art contests and eager to highlight the good work of its long-standing philanthropic partner, Babies"R"Us® has launched the Project Doodle Contest to celebrate the introduction of this limited edition t-shirt assortment.

"As an organization dedicated to providing support to children in need, while inspiring kids through art, we're thrilled to partner with Babies"R"Us® and Heidi on this initiative," said Mark Shriver, Senior Vice President for Strategic Initiatives for Save the Children. "The generous donation provided in conjunction with the launch of these t-shirts and the Project Doodle Contest will help us to further our mission in assisting youth in impoverished regions throughout the United States."

Beginning today, budding artists, ages 8 and younger, can visit Babiesrus.com/HeidiKlum or the company's Facebook page, Facebook.com/Babiesrus, to create and share their designs using Doodle.ly, a digital sketchpad. Through this contest, two designs will be chosen to be featured on t-shirts, which will be manufactured and sold in Babies"R"Us® stores nationwide and online this fall as part of the Truly Scrumptious by Heidi Klum collection.

"As a mom of four, I'm constantly drawing design inspiration from my kids — whether it's their unique fashion sense, their latest art project or simply their zest for life. Johan, my 6-year-old, is super creative, and I knew I wanted to incorporate his whimsical and imaginative designs into my Truly Scrumptious collection in a very special way," said Heidi Klum. "I'm so proud — as a mom and a designer — to introduce this one-of-a-kind assortment of t-shirts to Babies"R"Us® customers in conjunction with my all-new summer apparel collection. These adorable baseball style shirts featuring monsters — a nod to my signature Truly Scrumptious characters — will be used to shine a spotlight on the wonderful work Save the Children does for children throughout the United States. I can't wait to see all of the fun, unique designs that kids submit through the Project Doodle Contest, and watch them come to life as part of my fall line."

Johan Lends Designs to Limited Edition T-Shirts for Babies"R"Us®

Finding inspiration in her son's imaginative sketches, Heidi Klum continually incorporates signature characters and whimsical designs into her Truly Scrumptious collection. Now, Johan himself is playing designer, as Babies"R"Us® introduces two baseball-style t-shirts — one with pink sleeves and one with blue sleeves – featuring his hand-drawn, silly monster creations front and center. Sure to be loved by parents and children, the t-shirts are representative of the imagination and creativity of kids. Each shirt will be easily identifiable with a special hangtag to draw attention to Save the Children's U.S. Programs.

The tees can now be purchased online and will be available in Babies"R"Us® stores nationwide next week for $4.99. To complement the in-store availability of these unique shirts, customers will find eye-catching signage at the front of the stores' apparel sections touting the all-new assortment, as well as the Project Doodle Contest.

"We're thrilled to welcome Johan's designs in our stores nationwide and online as part of our Truly Scrumptious summer collection," said Neil Mulhall, Vice President, Divisional Merchandising Manager, Babies"R"Us®. "We're equally excited to offer little ones across the country a chance to play designer through the Project Doodle Contest, bringing another fun, unexpected assortment of kid-designed tees to our stores this fall."

The company will support the launch of the special, monster-themed tees, as well as the Project Doodle Contest, with dedicated email blasts and in-store signage, as well as social media support via Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. Customers can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @Babiesrus and using the #ProjectDoodle hash tag.

Little Artists Encouraged to Submit Creative Designs through Nationwide Contest

Building on Heidi Klum's mission to help inspire creativity among little ones everywhere, and to celebrate this new, kid-designed assortment, Babies"R"Us® has launched the Project Doodle Contest, providing children with an opportunity to share their own drawings in the social space, as well as the chance the win great prizes. Using Doodle.ly, a digital sketchpad, users are encouraged to doodle their most imaginative monster design before sharing them on the Babies"R"Us® Facebook fan page for a chance to win.

ENTER! Starting today, fans can visit the company's official Facebook page at Facebook.com/Babiesrus to register. Then, little artists ages 8 and younger can doodle their own, unique design right from a computer, iPad or mobile devise using Doodle.ly. With a blank canvas, eight drawing instruments and many colors to choose from, the possibilities are endless for budding artists. Once a design is complete, entrants will be encouraged to add a title and publish their submission, virtually posting it to the online gallery for all to see.

Those interested in entering can also pick up an official mail-in entry form at any local Babies"R"Us® store. The form includes a space for drawing the design, as well as information about how to submit their designs. All entries must be submitted by 11:59pm ET on April 23.

VOTE! Beginning Tuesday, April 23 through Monday, May 6, design guru Heidi Klum, along with a panel of judges from Babies"R"Us® and Save the Children, will choose ten finalists from the overall pool of entries.

Then, Babies"R"Us® will call upon the public to help choose two Grand Prize winners. Beginning Wednesday, May 8 through Monday, May 13, fans of the company's official Facebook page can vote for their favorite design in both the boy and girl categories.

WIN! At the end of the voting process, two designs will be named Grand Prize winners, each of which will appear on a tee that will be manufactured and sold as part of the Truly Scrumptious by Heidi Klum collection this fall, available exclusively at Babies"R"Us® stores nationwide. Plus, each Grand Prize winner will receive the entire 2013 Truly Scrumptious fall clothing collection, for their gender and size, up to 5T. In the event that a winner's clothing size is larger, they will receive a Babies"R"Us® Gift Card in the amount of the collection value. In addition, each of the remaining eight finalists will receive a $100 Babies"R"Us® gift card.

Company Builds on Longtime Support of Save the Children

Toys"R"Us, Inc. and the Toys"R"Us Children's Fund, together, have long been partners of Save the Children, donating more the $6.7 million to help support their work with children in underserved areas around the country, as well as for immediate disaster relief, most recently in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

To download images of Project Doodle Contest collateral, Heidi Klum and the new Truly Scrumptious by Heidi Klum t-shirts, please click here.

Save the Children works in nearly 120 countries, including the United States. We give children the best chance to fulfill their potential — a healthy start in life, nutritious food, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We save children's lives. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Seeks Applicants from Local Child Care and School Communities

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Hurricane Isaac
Three-year old Didi is one of the thousands of children served by our domestic emergency response programs. Help us be prepared for the next disaster in the U.S. with a gift to our Domestic Emergency Fund.

Domestic emergency fund

WASHINGTON (April 4, 2013) — It's been five months since Superstorm Sandy devastated the East Coast, but its effects linger, hindering the lives and livelihoods of children and families. Based on nearly 80 years of emergency experience, Save the Children knows that the restoration of children's programming is essential to rebuilding communities and is launching a recovery grant program to help some of the hardest-hit areas in New Jersey and New York.

Announced today, Save the Children's Hurricane Sandy Recovery Grant Program seeks to assist child-focused entities that experienced significant damage or interruption of business and programs due to Hurricane Sandy. Open to child care programs and K-12 schools, applications will be scored on a number of factors, including, the number of children who will benefit from the grant, how long children will benefit from the grant, and the extent of damage or loss of business operations. Grants will be awarded in increments of $5,000, with a maximum allotment of $50,000 per applicant.

Applications for Save the Children's Sandy Recovery Grant Program are available online at the U.S. Center for Child Development and Resiliency, www.savethechildren.org/USCenter. Questions can be submitted via email to USCenter@savechildren.org.

The grant recovery program is a critical initiative of Save the Children's Hurricane Sandy response. Immediately following Sandy's landfall on October 29, 2012, Save the Children's response team arrived on-the-ground in New Jersey and New York and has since worked in shelters, distributed goods, restored child care facilities and is currently guiding children and caregivers through its long-term emotional recovery program, Journey of Hope. To date, the organization has served more than 44,000 children and families as part of its Sandy response.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to quality education, healthy foods, and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters strike, like hurricanes and wildfires, Save the Children is among the first on the ground, ensuring the needs of children are being met.

In the United States, Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 185,000 children last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

About the U.S. Center for Child Development and Resiliency

A service of Save the Children, the U.S. Center for Child Development and Resiliency endeavors to equip professionals, volunteers and families with the skills and resources needed to give all children a better chance for a brighter future. Visit www.savethechildren.org/USCenter.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



In rural mountainous Guatemala, Save the Children is helping undernourished preschoolers like Isabella grow and gain weight. Tambien en Español

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(U.S.) Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)
(Guatemala) Patricia Ceballos 502.302.9109

GUATEMALA CITY (April 2, 2013) — Cristiano Ronaldo is gearing up to take on child hunger in Guatemala. "See how @SavetheChildren is showing parents how to use goat milk to tackle child #hunger in Guatemala," tweeted the Real Madrid football star today. Cristiano is referring to a goat milk program, featured in a new Save the Children video, which is helping chronically malnourished Guatemalan children like four-year-old Isabella gain weight and grow. View the video in English and in Spanish.

"Parents want to do everything they can for their child. As a father, I can only imagine how Isabella's mother must have felt, knowing her child was not getting the nourishment she needed," said Cristiano Ronaldo, referring to a mother and child featured in the video. "Fortunately, Isabella's mother got good advice from Save the Children on how healthy foods like goat milk can help Isabella gain weight and grow. But not all parents get this guidance, and that is heartbreaking."

Save the Children's goat-raising center in Guatemala offers milk as a source of protein for undernourished children living in rural communities. Nearly half of all children under age 5 in Guatemala are chronically malnourished.i In Quiche, a rural mountainous area about 165 kilometers outside of Guatemala City where Isabella lives, the number of chronically malnourished children climbs to more than 72 percent of under 5 children.ii One-year-olds are especially vulnerable once they stop breastfeeding and no longer get enough of the right proteins and nutrients in their daily diet.

"Healthy foods fuel the growth of a child's brain and body in their early years. Without them, children suffer life-long consequences — their growth is stunted, they are more susceptible to illness, they struggle to keep up and pay attention in school," said Carlos Carrazana, country director of Save the Children in Guatemala. "But when we reach children early on, we can change their future, and make sure they have a chance to reach their full potential."

Empowering Families to Tackle Child Hunger in Guatemala

Save the Children provides child hunger programs to families in the Western Highlands of Guatemala, an under-resourced area that is home to the country's ethnic minority community and where a high percentage of children are malnourished. In addition to the goat milk program, Save the Children counsels pregnant women, mothers and caretakers on how to breastfeed, and on how to help their kids be healthier and eat a better diet. Working with community volunteers and health workers, Save the Children reaches mothers through classes, home and health clinic visits, community fairs, community theater events and soccer tournaments.

The global humanitarian organization also advises families on how to grow more nutritious food, such as beans, corn, potatoes and vegetables, and how to raise animals for eggs, goat milk and meat. Families also learn how to increase their income through better marketing approaches and new business opportunities like horticulture and animal husbandry, which helps pay for food and other needs for their children.

"Look at beautiful Isabella today. She is a happy, healthier child," added Ronaldo. "I want her story of a life free from hunger to be the story of every Guatemalan child. That's a goal worth pursuing."

Get a Goat

You can buy a symbolic goat and support Save the Children.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.

iGuatemala Demography Health Survey (DHS 2008-2009)
iiIbid



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Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153 (O) 202.450.9152 (M)
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Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles visits with a Syrian mother who fled to Jordan with her newborn.  Miles was in Jordan this week to meet with Syrian families in the Za’atari refugee camp and the refugee host communities, in preparation for her upcoming meeting with the UN Security Council technical advisors. Save the Children photo.
Save the Children President and CEO Carolyn Miles visits with a Syrian mother who fled to Jordan with her newborn. Miles was in Jordan this week to meet with Syrian families in the Za’atari refugee camp and the refugee host communities, in preparation for her upcoming meeting with the UN Security Council technical advisors. Photo credit: Save the Children.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Mar. 27, 2013) — Save the Children's president and CEO, Carolyn Miles, met with mothers and newborn children who have sought refuge from the conflict in Syria this week at Za'atari camp in Jordan. Her visit follows the release of "Childhood Under Fire," a report by Save the Children warning of the dangers for Syrian children two years after the start of the conflict. Samantha Cameron, wife of UK Prime Minister David Cameron, also visited Save the Children's programs for Syrian refugees this week, in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley.

"Kids who have been through trauma really need to get into some kind of normal, something they are used to doing, like going to kindergarten, or going to pre-schools, so that's one of the reasons that we run these programs in the camps," Miles told the Associated Press after meeting with Syrian children in a nursery. Save the Children has established child-friendly spaces and education programs in Za'atari to help children regain a sense of normalcy.

Miles is also grateful for the support of Britain's first lady, Samantha Cameron, who met with women and children yesterday in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, where Save the Children is supporting local health centers and has established centers to help children cope with the effects of the conflict.

"Samantha Cameron's support, as a Save the Children ambassador, helps draw attention to the plight of children caught up in this terrifying conflict. Without more help, and quickly, we risk losing a generation of Syria's children," said Miles.

Cameron spoke to children who had witnessed the violent deaths of their parents and siblings, mothers whose children had been killed by snipers, and families who had been forced to flee their homes under gunfire with little more than the clothes on their backs. Families have experienced terrible violence, and are now living in flimsy shelters with limited access to food, water and medicine.

Cameron said, "As a mother, it is horrifying to hear the harrowing stories from the children I met today. No child should ever experience what they have."

Miles will be meeting with technical advisers for the UN Security Council in early April to shed light on the dire situation facing Syrian children, both inside and outside of Syria, and what humanitarian agencies are doing to meet their needs. She is available to speak on her visit to Jordan and Save the Children's programming.

Save the Children is appealing for funds to help its response in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan where it is delivering food, warm clothes, blankets, providing education and helping children recover from their experiences.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



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Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

Marian*, 5, at a refugee settlement near the Syrian border. Syrian refugee children are under constant risk of malnutrition, disease and trauma as the two-year Syrian conflict continues. Save the Children photo. *name has been changed to protect identity

Marian*, 5, at a refugee settlement near the Syrian border. Syrian refugee children are under constant risk of malnutrition, disease and trauma as the two-year Syrian conflict continues. Save the Children photo. *name has been changed to protect identity

Syria report cover
Read the report here

WESTPORT, Conn. (March 13, 2013) — Two million children trapped inside Syria are innocent victims of a bloody conflict that has already claimed 70,000 lives, Save the Children warned Wednesday, saying that these children are under constant risk of malnutrition, disease, trauma and early marriage.

In a new report, "Childhood Under Fire," launched to mark two years of violence in Syria, Save the Children details the impact of the conflict on children, showing that many are struggling to find enough to eat; are living in barns, parks and caves; are unable to go to school with teachers having fled and schools being attacked; and that damage to sanitation systems is forcing some children to defecate in the street.

Citing new research carried out amongst refugee children by Bahcesehir University in Turkey, the report also reveals the extent to which children have been directly targeted in the war, with one in three children reporting having been hit, kicked or shot at.

Combined with the breakdown of society in parts of the country and more than three million people displaced, the conflict has led to the collapse of childhood for millions of youngsters.

"Childhood under Fire" details how some young boys are being used by armed groups as porters, runners and human shields, bringing them close to the frontline, while some girls are being married off early to 'protect' them from a widely-perceived threat of sexual violence.

The report's key findings are:

  • Thousands of children are facing malnutrition as food production is wiped out and severe shortages take hold. "Why did we leave? Hunger. Food. There was none. No bread. If I stayed my children would have died from hunger," — Rami, father of three.
  • Millions of children have been forced from their homes and tens of thousands are living in parks, barns and caves. "There were 13 of us in total, crammed into one room. We did not leave that room for two weeks."- Yasmine, 12.
  • Girls are being married off early in an effort to protect them from perceived threat of sexual violence. "My daughter is 16 and she loved school. She is innocent and very pretty. I know that men are hurting women. We could not protect her, so we had to marry her. We needed her to have a protector." — Um Ali, mother of two.
  • Families have been left without heating in winter as fuel prices have risen by up to 500 percent. "In one area of Syria where Save the Children is responding, during the bitter winter, school benches were stolen for firewood; desperate, understandable measures to stay warm, but further erosion of children"s opportunities to learn and play."- Childhood Under Fire.

"For millions of Syrian children, the innocence of childhood has been replaced by the cruel realities of trying to survive this vicious war," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "Many are now living out in the open, struggling to find enough to eat, without the right medicine if they become sick or injured. As society has broken down, in the worst cases, hunger, homelessness and terror have replaced school for some of these young people. We cannot allow this to continue unchecked; the lives of too many children are at stake. "

The research by the Bahcesehir University also reveals the extent to which children have been affected by war, with nearly one third of children surveyed saying that they had been separated from members of their families due to the conflict. Three quarters of those surveyed had experienced the death of a close friend or family member. Many are showing signs of emotional difficulties as they struggle to come to terms with their experiences.

Save the Children, which is providing humanitarian relief in Syria and neighboring countries, is calling for all parties to the conflict to allow unfettered, safe access to populations in need and to ensure that everything is done to bring the fighting to an end.

It welcomes pledges to fund the $1.5 billion humanitarian appeal for Syria, and calls on governments to urgently deliver the money, which is designed to target aid both inside the stricken country and to refugees living on Syria"s borders.

To shine a light of solidarity for the children of Syria, Save the Children is planning a series of vigils in 21 countries around the world on Thursday, March 14th to mark two years of conflict in Syria. The real-life vigils will be complemented by a virtual vigil amplified by a "thunderclap" — a single, coordinated message that will synchronize social media with a united voice of support for the #SyriaCrisis. Virtual supporters can simply sign up to synchronize their own messages on Facebook and Twitter.

Save the Children is appealing for funds to help its response in Syria, Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan where it is delivering food, warm clothes, blankets, providing education and helping children recover from their experiences.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Save the Children Joined First Lady Michelle Obama at a White House Event Celebrating Community Efforts to Keep America's Kids Healthy and Active

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Safiya Simmons 301-237-2648
Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 7, 2013) — Save the Children was at the White House today, celebrating the achievements of faith groups in the fight to end childhood obesity in their communities. Director of Save the Children's Campaign for Healthy Kids, Andrew Hysell, was among the featured speakers at the event, which was organized by First Lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move Faith and Communities initiative.

"All faith leaders, regardless of denomination, care equally about the welfare of children. Save the Children's Campaign for Healthy Kids has teamed up with Let's Move Faith and Communities to harness that common concern," said Hysell. "The time has come for the faith community to present a unified front and promote a shared goal to end obesity on behalf of children nationwide."

"Save the Children and the Campaign for Healthy Kids is proud to partner with First Lady Michelle Obama and Let's Move Faith and Communities. We thank Mrs. Obama and the faith-based communities across the country for coming together to do this urgent work," said Hysell, who joined a number of prominent speakers at the event, including the First Lady; White House Assistant Chef and Senior Policy Advisor for Healthy Food Initiatives, Sam Kass; and two-time Olympic gold medalist Garrett Weber-Gale.

The childhood obesity epidemic is a crippling national disease in America, where one in three children and adolescents is diagnosed as obese or overweight. As a result, for the first time in modern history, this generation of children could expect to live shorter lives than their parents. But faith and community leaders are a potent antidote to this crisis. Grounded in their respective beliefs, people of faith can join forces in urging our lawmakers and national leaders to do more to combat childhood obesity.

Today's White House event recognized the extraordinary efforts of faith-based, neighborhood organizations to improve the health of children in their communities and honored the winner of the Communities on the Move video challenge: Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church. It also introduced a new initiative promoting physical activity among kids, Let's Move Active Schools.

"Save the Children is very excited about the new Let's Move Active Schools Initiative and looks forward to continuing our partnership with the First Lady and our national network of faith leaders," said Hysell. "Our combined efforts will ensure an outcome for this and future generations of children that is greater than the sum of its parts."

Save the Children's Campaign for Healthy Kids works with the faith community — through our Faith United to End Childhood Obesity initiative — to advance policy change in all 50 states. Faith United includes a wide variety of faith groups, representing diverse views and perspectives, but united by a desire to promote children's health through changes in policy and practice.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810 (O), 202.450.9153 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (March 6, 2013) — Half of the one million refugees who have now fled the war in Syria are children, Save the Children said Wednesday.

52 percent of those arriving in Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey and Iraq are children, many of whom are separated from one or both of their parents.

New UN figures show that this year has seen a spike in the numbers of desperate families fleeing Syria, with more than a third of the one million refugees arriving since the beginning of 2013.

Worst-case scenario predictions published just three months ago suggested the number would not reach a million until June, but the crisis is outstripping even the most pessimistic assessments.

"The fact that more than half the refugees who have fled this conflict are children shows how hard families are being hit by this brutal conflict. This is a war that is disproportionately affecting children, and the sharp increase in numbers fleeing the country shows how much worse the situation is getting," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "Every day we see thousands of children and their families arrive across the border, many with nowhere to go, often hungry and without a change of clothes. All they are looking for is somewhere warm and safe to sleep, a nutritious meal, and somewhere they can be children again."

"Save the Children and other agencies are doing all we can to help these refugees, but until the situation in Syria improves, the crisis on its borders will continue to grow. We are working inside Syria, but access to the worst affected communities is extremely difficult, and many are beyond our reach. Humanitarian organisations must be given the space they need to provide relief to those in need."

Save the Children is working on the ground across Syria and in Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan to provide support to families affected by the conflict. The aid agency is delivering food, warm clothing and helping children come to terms with their horrific experiences.

For interviews with Save the Children, contact Francine Uenuma. 202.450.9153

Save the Children Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



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Ajla Grozdanic 202.640.6709 (O) 202.262.7171 (M)
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

Save the Children's President and CEO Carolyn Miles Releases the Following Statement:

WESTPORT, Conn. (Feb. 27, 2013) — Just two weeks ago, President Obama pledged that as a nation we need to "come together to protect our most precious resource — our children." It is a travesty that, unless Congress and the President can reach an agreement, we are only hours away from nearly $85 billion in automatic, across-the-board funding cuts, halting crucial efforts to protect and provide for children in the United States and around the world.

We urge our leaders to do what we teach the preschoolers in Save the Children's programs every day: play nice; get along; and work it out. Time is running out for Congress and the President to set aside politics and do what it takes to ensure that the most vulnerable among us, our children, are not the ones who pay the price of the looming budget cuts.

Children's programs make up a fraction of the budget, but cutting them will have a negative impact on entire lives and futures. Without an agreement by our country's leaders, children around the world and right here in America will face the following risks:

Around the world:[i]

  • More than 1 million children will go without preventative treatment from life-threatening diseases like pneumonia.
  • More than 350,000 orphaned and vulnerable children will miss out on getting the boost they need through good nutrition, schooling and economic opportunities.
  • 111,000 fewer HIV-positive pregnant women will receive Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission services, leading to more than 21,000 babies being infected with HIV.

In America:[ii]

  • More than 2,700 schools will lose critical federal funds, affecting nearly 1.2 million students in need.
  • 70,000 young children will lose access to early learning services, and more than 10,000 teachers could lose their jobs.
  • Up to 30,000 children will lose access to child care.
  • Roughly 600,000 mothers and children will be dropped from the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) feeding program through the end of September 2013, threatening their health and nutrition.

At Save the Children, we know first-hand the difference that investments in early learning programs can make in helping children get ready for and succeed in school. We have also made tremendous progress in reducing the number of young children dying from treatable and preventable causes and are dedicated to making the promise of an AIDS-free generation a reality. Save the Children has long advocated for more resources and investments in such programs.

At a time when nearly one in four children in America lives in poverty, and vulnerable girls and boys around the world face disease, hunger and unspeakable violence, making deep and disproportionate cuts to child-focused programs is unconscionable. It is true that difficult choices must be made to reduce our deficit, but our leaders must not balance the budget on the backs of children.

Sign our petition to urge Congress to oppose funding cuts that threaten to harm children's futures: www.savethechildren.org/fiscal-cliff-news.

Save the Children Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.

[i] Source for global statistics: http://www.amfar.org/uploadedFiles/_amfarorg/In_The_Community/SequestrationJuly2012.pdf, pages 2 and 3
[ii] Source for U.S. statistics: White House data published on WashingtonPost.com.



New Report Identifies Four Major Barriers to Better Breastfeeding

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Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

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If all women around the world breastfed their babies immediately after birth, the lives of 830,000 babies a year could be saved. Read the Full Report

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WESTPORT, Conn. (Feb. 18, 2013) — If all women around the world breastfed their babies immediately after birth, the lives of 830,000 babies a year could be saved, Save the Children estimates in a new report released today.

In "Superfood for Babies," the international humanitarian and development agency identified four significant barriers that prevent more women from successfully breastfeeding, including during the critical "power hour" after birth. They are: cultural and community pressures, the health worker shortage, lack of maternity legislation, and aggressive marketing of breast-milk substitutes.

"Last year, we saw a lot of handwringing in this country over how long is too long for moms to breastfeed. But the real scandal is that many moms around the world don't get the support they need to start breastfeeding early – or even at all. It's a choice all moms should have, and in the developing world it can literally be a matter of life and death for their babies," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children.

Breastfeeding in the "Power Hour" After Birth Saves Lives

The colostrum, as the first milk is called, jump starts a baby's immune system. Earlier breastfeeding also leads to higher rates of exclusive breastfeeding for six months, which further reduces vulnerability to malnutrition and deadly disease, Save the Children's new report explains. An analysis of the best available studies on early breastfeeding in Africa and Asia suggest that universal breastfeeding within the first hour of life could save 830,000 babies lives a year, the report says.

Breastfeeding is the world's most effective solution to reducing child deaths, yet global breastfeeding rates have stagnated at below 40 percent for two decades. On the heels of President Obama's State of the Union address pledge to help to save children around the world from preventable deaths, Save the Children's new report investigates what is keeping more women from breastfeeding immediately after birth or continuing for six months.

Moms in Developing World and U.S. Face Barriers to Breastfeeding

The report reveals barriers including: family pressures, cultural beliefs that the colostrum is dirty, lack of a skilled health worker to help moms at one third of all births, lack of maternity leave and supportive workplace policies, and evidence of direct marketing of formula to mothers and health workers in violation of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes.

While not as crucial to helping American babies survive as those in the developing world, breastfeeding here has proven health benefits as well, including lower chances for obesity. American mothers have the industrialized world's lowest level of protection when it comes to maternity leave policy, and only 6.7% of US births occur in "Baby Friendly" hospitals or birthing centers that meet World Health Organization and UNICEF guidelines for promoting early and exclusive breastfeeding.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported this month that U.S. breastfeeding rates have risen, but warned that many American women are not getting the support they need if they choose to breastfeed or continue breastfeeding.

Are We Supporting Moms Enough?

"Women everywhere should have all the support and information they need to make the best choices for themselves and for the health and survival of their children," Miles said. "At the same time, all of us can do something to help save hundreds of thousands of babies from needless death. It's a matter of raising our voices for these children."

Breastfeeding provides babies with the best possible defense against malnutrition, which is the underlying cause of one in three child deaths globally, more than 2 million child deaths a year. Learn more and watch a video about a breastfeeding program in Brazil.  

Save the Children is calling on Americans to tell Secretary Kerry renew the U.S. commitment to a critical 2010 global nutrition initiative. Set to expire in June, the 1,000 Days Partnership has already helped countries like Indonesia, Ethiopia, Bangladesh and Tanzania adopt nutrition strategies, including breastfeeding promotion, aimed at helping children survive and grow up healthy.

Help mothers get the support they need to breastfeed their babies. Sign the petition here: www.savethechildren.org/1000-days

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contacts
Wendy Christian 203.465.8010 (M)
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171 (M)

Washington, D.C. (Feb. 13, 2013) — Last night, President Barack Obama urged America to "come together to protect our most precious resource — our children."

"The President laid out a clear and compelling roadmap to helping American families, especially the nearly one in four children living in poverty," said Mark K. Shriver, senior vice president of Save the Children's U.S. Programs. "We are pleased by his call for increased investments in early childhood education — we know firsthand the difference that high-quality early learning programs can make and have long advocated for more resources for such programs. We look forward to supporting efforts to make the President's ideas a reality, and believe the National Commission on Children is a proven way to do that."

Leading up to the President's national address on Tuesday, Save the Children — joined by more than 40 other organizations — gathered nearly 100,000 voices in support of a children's commission, calling on the Obama Administration to speak out and take action for underserved kids in the United States.

"We were pleased to see poverty referenced throughout his speech, and not just in America, but in developing countries where Save the Children is on the ground helping children survive and thrive," added Save the Children's CEO Carolyn Miles. "We've made progress in ending child deaths from treatable and preventable causes but we hope the Administration's continued support will create further opportunities to make zero child deaths — and the promise of an AIDS-free generation — a reality."

"Now is the time for the country to come together to find bold, new ideas to ensure all children — here in America and around the world — are safe and protected," continued Miles. "We want to work with the President, policymakers from both sides of the aisle and everyone who cares about children to get this work done."

Child protection has been a top priority for Save the Children throughout its nearly 100-year history. The organization's programs in the United States and across the globe focus on the needs of the most vulnerable children, while aiming to keep all children free from abuse, neglect, exploitation and violence. In the wake of the tragedy in Newtown, Conn., Save the Children partnered with other likeminded organizations to call on the President and Congress to establish a National Commission on Children dedicated to reducing childhood poverty, obesity, illiteracy and violence.

To learn more and join our effort to keep America's kids safe, visit www.savethechildren.org/protect.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.640.6810(O), 202.450.9153(M)

Washington, D.C. (Feb. 13, 2013)—Save the Children is warning that thousands of children displaced by the conflict in Mali face food shortages. These children were already suffering from the devastating food crisis even before being displaced, and require urgent humanitarian aid as their families cannot afford to buy enough food.

Save the Children estimates that 203,500 children fled their homes in the northern regions of Gao, Timbuktu and Kidal since the outset of the conflict over a year ago. More than half of them have been displaced within the country, while the rest have sought refuge in neighboring countries.

"Thousands of children have had to flee their homes in terror after suffering months of extreme hunger and are now at risk," said Tom McCormack, Save the Children’s Country Director in Mali. "Children are still going hungry, with many cutting down on meals and some reduced to eating only rice. They need urgent help."

Displaced families have told Save the Children staff about their daily struggle to get by:

  • "Food is a problem. We don’t have money so we don’t have food. I only eat rice and gruel and am hungry," Amada, 13-year-old boy [Koutiala].
  • "The children tell me all the time they’re still hungry. We only have rice to eat, we can’t afford vegetables, we urgently need food," Zeinabou, 44, mother of seven children [Sikasso].
  • "It was really hard in Niger, especially because of the hunger. I was eating rice, only rice. It was expensive, and there wasn’t enough money to buy anything more," Maimouna, 15-year-old-girl [former refugee in Niger, recently displaced to Koutiala]. As the conflict begins to abate in some parts of the north, tens of thousands of displaced families are now faced with the difficult decision of whether to return home. But without assistance, Save the Children says that they face the prospect of returning completely destitute, many to houses and shops that have been destroyed and pillaged during the fighting.

Many will be forced to rebuild and replace what was stolen or damaged with no income or savings to do so. Making matters worse, the northern region is still affected by the food crisis, which has an impact on hundreds of thousands of children.

"While fighting dies down in some areas, the situation is far from stabilized and many families will remain displaced for weeks or even months to come. Those who do return home will face extreme difficulties in rebuilding their lives, and for all those affected by both the food crisis and the conflict, it is clear the road to recovery will be a long one," McCormack said. "We need to remember that even before the recent conflict or food crisis, Mali was already one of the poorest countries in the world."

Save the Children has been in Mali for 25 years and is now working to expand its existing protection, livelihoods and nutrition programs to meet the needs of displaced children who have arrived in Mopti, south of Gao and Kidal, as well as southern areas of the country such as Sikasso.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Expected to reach 100,000 signatures by the State of the Union address, a new petition demonstrates growing demand for a National Commission on Children

Media Contacts
Wendy Christian 203.465.8010 (M)
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171 (M)

Washington, D.C. (Feb. 11, 2013)—In advance of the State of the Union address, Save the Children—together with Children's Health Fund, Every Child Matters, First Focus, Harlem Children's Zone, Share Our Strength and The Center for the Next Generation—has launched a petition urging the Obama Administration to establish a National Commission on Children. The petition is expected to reach 100,000 supporters by the time the President addresses the nation tomorrow.

"Now is the time for the country to come together to find bold, new ideas to ensure all of America's children are safe and protected," said Mark Shriver, senior vice president of Save the Children's U.S. Programs. "We can do more, and we must do more. We're asking everyone to join our urgent call for a National Commission by signing this petition today."

The new Commission would be tasked with creating a national policy on children and setting goals for reducing childhood poverty, obesity, illiteracy, and violence. The petition, launched in the wake of the tragic shooting in Newtown, Conn., counts more than 40 prominent organizations among its supporters, including Boys & Girls Clubs of America, the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation, Catholic Charities USA , Child Care Aware® of America, Girls Inc., KaBOOM!, National Association of School Nurses and the YMCA of the USA.

The first National Commission on Children was formed by President Reagan and Congress in 1987 and ultimately led to the enactment of the Earned Income Tax Credit, the Child Tax Credit and the creation of the Children's Health Insurance Program, among other important initiatives. Twenty-five years later, it's time for another Commission to develop new solutions to today's challenges.

While Save the Children endorses the President's proposal to curb gun violence, as well as measures to expand mental health services, these are just the first steps toward addressing a very complex issue: the safety and well-being of all children in a country where nearly one in four lives in poverty. Proactive policy initiatives that protect our nation's children are critical not only to a child's development, but to the health and stability of our country.

Child protection has been a top priority for Save the Children throughout its nearly 100-year history. The organization's programs in the United States and across the globe focus on the needs of the most vulnerable children, while aiming to keep all children free from abuse, neglect, exploitation and violence. Immediately following the Dec. 14 tragedy in Newtown, Conn., Save the Children—headquartered in nearby Westport, Conn.—deployed staff to provide emotional support to the children and parents in the affected community.

To sign the petition, visit www.savethechildren.org/protect or Text KIDS to 69866. Message and data rates may apply.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Since 2003, Campaign Raises Nearly $74 Million, Supports More than 10 Million Children

Media Contact
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718 (M)

IKEA's annual Soft Toy for Education campaign raised $12 million in 2012. The donation will support 18 education projects carried out by UNICEF and Save the Children in 17 countries. Photo by Jeff Holt.
IKEA's annual Soft Toy for Education campaign raised $12 million in 2012. The donation will support 18 education projects carried out by UNICEF and Save the Children in 17 countries. Photo by Jeff Holt.

WESTPORT, Conn. (Feb. 8, 2013) — The IKEA Foundation along with IKEA customers and co-workers have partnered together on a $12 million donation to Save the Children and UNICEF for global education projects.

The funds were raised during IKEA's annual Soft Toy for Education campaign, which ran from Nov. 4 to Dec. 29, 2012. For each soft toy or children's book purchased, $1.30 was donated to UNICEF and Save the Children by the IKEA Foundation. In the U.S., IKEA raised more than $1 million through the sales of soft toys and children's books.

The $12 million donation will support 18 education projects carried out by UNICEF and Save the Children in 17 countries. UNICEF's share will fund the Schools for Africa initiative in eight countries and the Schools in Asia initiative in China. Save the Children's equal share will support education for children in the most marginalized groups (minorities and children with disabilities) in Asia and Eastern Europe.

"We would like to thank both the IKEA Foundation and IKEA co-workers and customers for their support of Save the Children's programs for children from minority groups and children with disabilities. We look forward to continue our work with the Soft Toys for Education campaign, together with IKEA and the IKEA Foundation next year," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children.

The donations help UNICEF and Save the Children train teachers in child-friendly teaching methods, improve child protection systems, supply educational materials, and increase school attendance rates.

"Heartfelt thanks from UNICEF to every person who bought an IKEA soft toy, and to every co-worker who worked so hard to make the campaign a success. This year's generous donation will help us support quality education for some of the most vulnerable children in the world. The impressive support of the IKEA Foundation, millions of IKEA customers and thousands of co-workers worldwide is an excellent example of collective action that will bring positive and long-lasting change to children's lives," said Leila Pakkala, director, Private Fundraising and Partnerships, UNICEF.

Since 2003, the start of this annual campaign, the IKEA Foundation has raised nearly $74 million, which has helped improve the educational opportunities of more than 10 million children in 45 countries.

IKEA strives to be 'The Life Improvement Store,' and since its 1943 founding in Sweden, has offered home furnishings of good design and function, at low prices so the majority of people can afford them. There are currently more than 340 IKEA stores in 40 countries, including 38 stores in the US (40 stores are owned and run by franchisees outside the IKEA Group). IKEA Stores welcomed a total of 776 million visitors last year. IKEA, the world's leading home furnishings company, incorporates sustainable efforts into day-to-day business and supports initiatives that benefit children and the environment.

The IKEA Foundation aims to improve the opportunities for children and youth by funding holistic, long-term programs that can create substantial, lasting change, and enable them to take charge of their own future. We work with strong strategic partners applying innovative approaches to achieve large-scale results in four fundamental areas of a child's life. Currently funded programs benefit an estimated 100 million children.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma (202) 640-6810 (O), (202) 450-9153 (M)

Hassan, 4, walks through a makeshift tented community in Lebanon's Beka'a valley that has become home to families who have fled the conflict in neighboring Syria. Photo by Sam Tarling/Save the Children
Hassan, 4, walks through a makeshift tented community in Lebanon's Beka'a valley that has become home to families who have fled the conflict in neighboring Syria. Photo by Sam Tarling/Save the Children

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Jan. 29, 2013) — A huge funding shortfall is leaving thousands of Syrian children and families without essential aid, Save the Children has warned, as governments meet in Kuwait to provide aid to the region.

Syrian children are facing freezing temperatures, sometimes living in abandoned buildings and farms. Many have fled with their families with little or no food, some telling Save the Children staff that they even had to burn their clothes to warm themselves up.

More than 4.6 million people are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance, and refugee numbers have doubled in many places in the past few weeks.

In the face of this crisis, just 3 percent of the United Nation's $1.5 billion humanitarian appeal has been met as governments from around the world meet in Kuwait on Wednesday to offer assistance for Syria's refugees and displaced families.

"Every day, thousands of people are fleeing Syria or become displaced inside the country. Many of them literally run for their lives, escaping intensified fighting and shortages of food, medicines and fuel. They're terrified and need urgent aid," said Jasmine Whitbread, Save the Children International's Chief Executive.

"Fleeing families have suffered terribly and in many places are facing sub-zero temperatures, without shelter or warm clothes. Governments meeting in Kuwait need to give them a lifeline before it's too late."

Humanitarian needs created by the Syrian conflict have multiplied in recent weeks. This month, nearly 40,000 people have fled Syria into Jordan alone, double the number who arrived in December. Numbers of registered refugees overall have quadrupled in the past six months as the fighting intensifies.

Despite the huge cost of hosting over 700,000 refugees since the conflict began almost two years ago, countries around Syria have offered support to those who have fled.

But more funding is urgently required in order to provide lifesaving assistance to Syrian children and their families in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, and Turkey as well as the millions of people displaced inside Syria.

"The international aid appeal for Syria has always been massively underfunded. Funds are urgently needed as the number of families in need of help increases by the day," said Ms. Whitbread.

Save the Children is bringing vital lifesaving assistance to children and their families in Jordan, Lebanon and Iraq, reaching nearly 130,000 people across the region. The aid agency is aiming to raise $94 million, with only a third funded so far.

To donate to Save the Children's response in Syria please visit: www.savethechildren.org/syria-donate

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

Syrian refugees arrive at the reception area in Zaatari camp on January 24th. Photo by Save the Children.
Syrian refugees arrive at the reception area in Zaatari camp on January 24th. Photo by Save the Children.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Jan. 24, 2013) — In the last 24 hours as many as 10,000 children and their families have fled from Syria into Jordan.

As fighting intensified in southern Syria, almost 20,000 refugees arrived at the border. Nearly 3,500 people made it to Zaatari camp Wednesday night.

Up to four to five buses are arriving in the camp every hour — the majority crammed full of frightened and exhausted people who fled with what little they could carry.

"Many women and children are running for their lives arriving with just the clothes on their backs. Many are unable to pack essential supplies and desperately need our help. It's freezing, wet and the camp is already overcrowded," said Saba Al Mobaslat, Save the Children's Program Director in Zaatari camp.

"Many children who are arriving are exhausted, shocked and terrified. Despite the best efforts of aid workers, the camp is reaching a breaking point and this is going to get so much worse in the next few days if numbers continue to rise at such an alarming rate."

Temperatures have fallen in the camp. Heavy rains are expected next week, prompting further concerns for the more than 50,000 people already living in the Zaatari camp.

Save the Children, in partnership with UN agencies and Jordanian authorities, is working around the clock to help the refugees providing food, blankets and winter clothes. It is also providing emotional support for children who have suffered or witnessed brutal attacks within Syria.

Save the Children is bringing vital lifesaving help to children in Jordan, Lebanon and Iraq. Across the region, we have already reached nearly 130,000 people.

To donate to Save the Children's response in Syria please visit: savethechildren.org/syria

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Every child has a right to grow up happy and healthy. See how you can help.



Donation to Benefit Early Childhood Development, Literacy and Health Programs in Three Elementary Schools in West Virginia's Impoverished McDowell County.

Media Contacts
Ajla Grozdanic 202.262.7171
Jeri Matheney 304.348.4130

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Jan. 14, 2013) — Save the Children received a $30,000 contribution from Appalachian Power to support early childhood development, literacy, as well as physical activity and nutrition programs in West Virginia's McDowell County. Focused on helping children in need grow, achieve academic success, and develop healthy habits, the programs are offered in partnership with three elementary schools, as part of the Reconnecting McDowell Initiative.

Save the Children is one of 110 partners of the Reconnecting McDowell Initiative, launched last year to revitalize the poverty-stricken county in southern West Virginia. Since the start of the initiative, Save the Children's programs — offered through Bradshaw Elementary, Iaeger Elementary and Welch Elementary schools — served 527 children in need.

"Children living in poverty fall behind because they aren't given the same opportunities to succeed as other children," said Mark Shriver, senior vice president of Save the Children's U.S. Programs. "Our programs work to close that gap, and this generous gift from Appalachian Power will help us continue to put children in McDowell County on a pathway to a lifetime of success." "At Appalachian Power, we see the effects of poverty in McDowell County on a daily basis," said Appalachian Power President and COO Charles Patton. "We want to help break this cycle of poverty, and that's why we're part of Reconnecting McDowell. We believe the key lies with the children of McDowell County. If we help them have a better start in life, we can help everyone build a better future."

Striving to give children the opportunity to succeed in school and life, Save the Children will use the funds to achieve substantial, measurable results, ensuring that children in McDowell County are ready to learn by the time they begin school, have the tools and support they need to read on grade level, and are healthy and active. In West Virginia, Save the Children has operated its core programs — Early Steps to School Success, Literacy, and Healthy Choices, since 2010. The organization currently partners with 11 communities in five counties, benefiting 3,952 children in the state.

About Reconnecting McDowell

In December 2011, the American Federation of Teachers joined forces with nonprofit groups, government agencies, private companies and educators to help break the cycle of poverty for the 22,000 residents of McDowell County, which is among the poorest in the nation. More than a decade after the state Department of Education took over control of its schools, McDowell County continues to have one of the highest dropout rates in West Virginia. To learn more, read this latest story by the Associated Press.

About Save the Children

Save the Children works to break the cycle of poverty and improve the lives of children by ensuring they have the resources they need — access to a quality education, healthy foods and opportunities to grow and develop in a nurturing environment. When disasters like hurricanes and wildfires strike, Save the Children is among the first on the ground ensuring the needs of children are being met.

Save the Children's early childhood education, literacy, physical activity and nutrition, and emergency response programs reached more than 185,000 children and families in the United States last year alone. For more information, visit www.savethechildren.org/usa.

About Appalachian Power

Appalachian Power has 1 million customers in Virginia, West Virginia and Tennessee (as AEP Appalachian Power). It is a unit of American Electric Power, one of the largest electric utilities in the United States, which delivers electricity to more than 5 million customers in 11 states. AEP ranks among the nation's largest generators of electricity, owning nearly 38,000 megawatts of generating capacity in the U.S. AEP also owns the nation's largest electricity transmission system, a nearly 39,000-mile network that includes more 765 kilovolt extra-high voltage transmission lines than all other U.S. transmission systems combined.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Makes Urgent Call for National Commission on Children

Statement by Carolyn S. Miles, President & CEO

Media Contact: Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (January 16, 2013) — Save the Children applauds President Obama for introducing a package of proposals and executive action today aimed at keeping America’s children safe. Proactive policy initiatives that ensure the safety and well-being of our nation’s children are critical not only to a child’s development, but to the health and stability of our country.

We’ve always said that a comprehensive approach is needed, and that’s what we saw today from the President with efforts focused on not just gun control, but also law enforcement, mental health and school safety. Requiring criminal background checks and a ban on assault weapons are steps we need to take as a country. And we are pleased to see the President also push for a national dialogue on mental health and a commitment to mental health parity regulations. The time is now for these and other measures.

Child protection has been a top priority for Save the Children throughout our nearly 100-year history. Our programs in the United States and across the globe focus on the needs of the most vulnerable children, while aiming to keep all children free from abuse, neglect ,exploitation and violence.

That’s why Save the Children is partnering today with Children’s Heath Fund, Every Child Matters, First Focus, Harlem Children’s Zone and Share Our Strength to urge the Obama Administration to take this dialogue one step further by establishing a National Commission on Children. This new Commission should be tasked with creating a national policy on children, setting goals for protecting children’s wellbeing, including reducing poverty and violence as well as monitoring progress against those goals.

When tragedy struck in our backyard of Newtown, CT on December 14, we all felt heartbroken as 26 lives were lost, 20 of them bright, young children. We sprinted into action, deploying staff to provide emotional support to the children of Newtown and the greater community.

Now, the entire country must come together to find bold, new ideas to ensure all of America’s children are safe and protected. We can do more, and we must do more. We’re asking everyone to join our urgent call for a National Commission by signing this petition today.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



"The REAL Awards" announced by Save the Children and the Frontline Health Workers Coalition Recognize Nine Extraordinary Health Workers as Red-Carpet Worthy

Media Contact:  Phil Carroll 202.215.0638

Donn Kropp, REAL Award winner in the emergency care category, shakes hands with former President Bill Clinton at the Patient Safety, Science and Technology Summit Monday in Laguna Niguel, Calif.
Donn Kropp, REAL Award winner in the emergency care category, shakes hands with former President Bill Clinton at the Patient Safety, Science and Technology Summit Monday in Laguna Niguel, Calif. ©2013 Patient Safety Science & Technology Summit c/o Masimo Foundation; courtesy of Bob Ortiz.

LAGUNA NIGUEL, Calif. (Jan. 15, 2013) - Sixty miles southeast of Hollywood, the inaugural class of The REAL Awards health worker honorees was announced last night at the Inaugural Patient Safety, Science & Technology Summit hosted by the Masimo Foundation, and attended by former president Bill Clinton. The nine winners—who represent a variety of sectors, from newborn and mother care to emergency, hospice and at-home care—were recognized for their extraordinary service in healthcare. Two of the honorees were there in person to accept REAL Awards on behalf of the first-year winners at 7 p.m. on January 14.

"During Hollywood’s awards season, our attention tends to focus on honoring entertainers," said Mary Beth Powers, chief of the newborn and child survival campaign at Save the Children. "This awards program puts a new twist on this phenomenon. It gives Americans a chance to celebrate something deeply honorable—the lifesaving work of countless men and women on the frontlines of healthcare."

The nine U.S.-based honorees include: Kathryn M. Tschiegg (General health care); Dr. Beth Dupree (Chronic disease care); Dr. William Novick and Dr. Robert Clifford (Pediatric care); Carri Butcher (Hospice care); Melissa Courtney and Dr. Joseph Tate (Newborn and mother care); Donn Kropp (Emergency care); and Rhonda Dixon (At-home care). The global winners, revealed in September 2012, include midwives, nurses and community health workers from Africa and Asia.

"Masimo Foundation is delighted to honor the work of dedicated health professionals globally, and here in the United States," said Joe Kiani, Chairman and Chief Executive Office of Masimo Corporation, one of the awards' presenting sponsors. "Oftentimes, they do not receive the level of recognition they deserve and yet they continue to dutifully serve millions of communities and families around the world."

"From southern India to northern Kenya, the life-saving work of these unsung heroes often goes unrecognized," added Jacob A. Gayle, Executive Director of the Medtronic Foundation, another presenting sponsor. "Medtronic Foundation supports The REAL Awards initiative because we believe those health workers who serve on the frontlines are key to ensuring that our most underserved communities can be linked to existing health care systems and thereby seek the services they need." Frontline health workers are a main focus of Medtronic Foundation’s work in underserved regions of the world.

"Merck Foundation applauds the honorees for their steadfast commitment to improving access to needed health services, particularly for women and children in vulnerable communities," said Brian Grill, Executive Vice President of the Merck Foundation. "We are proud to be a founding supporter of this program to honor frontline health workers who are the back-bone of primary care for so many in need."

The REAL Awards, created by Save the Children in partnership with the Frontline Health Workers Coalition, is a first-of-its-kind global awards program designed to develop greater respect and appreciation for health workers and the lifesaving care they provide globally, as well as in the United States. The REAL Awards is made possible by the support of presenting sponsors Medtronic Foundation, Merck Foundation, and Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation and Competition in Healthcare.

The public can read the inspirational stories of the international and domestic REAL Awards honorees at www.theREALawards.com.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

The Masimo Foundation for Ethics, Innovation, and Competition in Healthcare is a U.S.-based, private charitable foundation that is focused on improving patient care, preserving patient dignity and reducing cost of care, through philanthropic programs and research initiatives that foster an environment of aligned incentives, highest level of ethics for those who take part in the care of patients, and healthy and honest competition.

The Medtronic Foundation is committed to improving the lives of people around the world living with chronic disease, with a majority of grant making committed to expanding access to quality healthcare among underserved populations. In addition, grants support health initiatives in communities where Medtronic employees live and give.

Merck Foundation is a U.S.-based, private charitable foundation. Established in 1957 by Merck, a global healthcare leader, the Foundation is funded entirely by the company and is Merck's chief source of funding support to qualified non-profit, charitable organizations. Since its inception, The Merck Company Foundation has contributed more than $700 million to support important initiatives that address societal needs and are consistent with Merck's overall mission to help the world be well.

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Media Contact
Francine Uenuma 202.450.9153

WESTPORT, Conn. (Jan. 14, 2013) — As French and other forces conduct an offensive against Islamist rebels in the northern districts of Mali, Save the Children is warning that children and women forced to flee for their lives are among the poorest and most vulnerable in the country. Families forced from their homes are adding to the almost 350,000 people who fled the region after last year’s fighting erupted.

Save the Children's Country Director Tom McCormack said, "Families and children are starting to arrive in Bamako and other areas. They have fled the fighting and are especially vulnerable. Many of these displaced families were likely too poor to flee the fighting last year as the northern reaches of Mali suffered through one of the worst droughts in living memory. Many will be in dire need of assistance."

For more information on Mali please visit our page here.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.



Media Contact
Tanya Weinberg 202.640.6647 (O), 202.247.6610 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (January 14, 2013) — Recognizing that nearly 2 million newborns could be saved each year by making basic care more accessible to mothers in developing countries, Save the Children is pleased to announce the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's new five-year grant of $40 million to its Saving Newborn Lives program.

Since 2000, Save the Children's Saving Newborn Lives program has worked with governments and partners to develop and support the adoption of affordable and effective ways to improve newborn health and survival in many of the poorest countries in the world. During that time, substantial progress has been made towards clearly defining the major causes of newborn deaths and documenting what can be done to address those causes in countries where the need is greatest.

The new grant will enable Save the Children to demonstrate that proven solutions can be effectively delivered at large scale within the context of existing health programs. The Saving Newborn Lives program will continue its efforts to mobilize governments, donors, local partners and communities to make reducing newborn deaths a top priority while informing the global and country community what it takes to deliver lifesaving newborn care at scale. Save the Children will focus its work in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where more than three quarters of the world's newborn deaths occur.

In the decade since Save the Children established its Saving Newborn Lives program with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, annual newborn deaths have dropped globally from 4 to 2.9 million. But progress is mixed across countries and regions and newborn deaths now account for over 43% of all deaths of children under the age of 5. Political commitment and funding for newborn survival and health remains inadequate, and progress in reducing newborn mortality lags behind recent progress in maternal survival and survival of older pre-school age children.

Working with local partners, Save the Children has demonstrated that empowering frontline health workers to educate families and provide basic newborn care in their communities, while linking to quality care for mothers and babies in health facilities, can dramatically reduce deaths and be replicated at scale.

"There is now substantial evidence that the vast majority of newborn deaths can be prevented with low-cost, low-tech care, such as teaching a mother the Kangaroo Mother Care method of keeping her newborn warm and to breastfeed her baby starting at birth," said Carolyn Miles, President & CEO of Save the Children. "This new five-year grant comes at a critical moment to accelerate progress in newborn survival, by allowing us to bring lifesaving interventions to many more mothers and newborns."

More information can be found at www.savethechildren.org/savenewborns.

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and around the world. Save the Children's Saving Newborn Lives program works in partnership with countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America to reduce newborn mortality and improve newborn health. www.savechildren.org

Save the Children is the leading, independent organization that creates lasting change for children in need in the United States and 120 countries around the world. Save the Children's Saving Newborn Lives program works in partnership with countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America to reduce newborn mortality and improve newborn health. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contact
Wendy Christian 203.221.3767 (O) 203.465.8010 (M)

WESTPORT, Conn. (Jan. 8, 2013) - Although the world has made substantial progress over the last two decade - lifting 600 million people out of poverty, increasing child survival rates and helping 56 million more children to go to school – more work needs to be done to truly ensure a sustainable future for the world's poorest children, Save the Children said today.

An influential United Nations' panel, chaired by the presidents of Liberia and Indonesia and the UK Prime Minister (which includes John Podesta, former chief of staff for Clinton), meeting later this month has a unique opportunity to eradicate extreme poverty by 2030, by outlining a concrete new development framework to replace the UN's Millennium Development Goals, which expire in 2015.

Save the Children's report, Ending Poverty in Our Generation, outlines a new development system, which, it says, can end extreme poverty in the next 20 years. It also includes one of the first proposals for new targets to replace the Millennium Development Goals.

Save the Children's Chief Executive Officer Carolyn Miles said: "With the 2015 deadline fast approaching, Save the Children is working globally to ensure that collectively, we learn the lessons of the current Millennium Development Goals and contribute to the evolution of an ambitious new global development framework."

The Millennium Development Goals were eight international targets adopted by every United Nations member state in 2000 with commitments to tackling global challenges such as extreme poverty, child deaths and a lack of education. Progress has been mixed, with some developing countries on track to achieve all targets and others looking unlikely to meet any.

Miles continued: "Our flagship report discusses what we believe are core priorities and identifies 10 key recommendations for fostering a post-2015 framework that emphasizes human development, equity, and accountability with a focus on our future – the children."

The report says the end of extreme poverty is now in sight because of remarkable progress made in improving the lives of millions. For example, the number of under-five deaths worldwide declined from nearly 12 million in 1990 to under 7 million in 2011, and an additional 56 million children enrolled in primary school from 1999 to 2009.

The report warns of three major threats to the process:

  • A failure to tackle inequality in the framework, which will mean progress will be too slow and some groups will be left behind.
  • A desire to cram too much into the framework leading to a lowest common denominator outcome.
  • A fragmented and already fractious political process at UN level

Notes to Editors

The High Level Panel, chaired by the President of Liberia H.E. Ms. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the President of Indonesia H.E. Mr. Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and the UK Prime Minister H.E. Mr. David Cameron, will meet in Monrovia, Liberia between Jan. 29 and Feb. 1, 2013. The US will be represented in the high level panel by John Podesta, former White House Chief of Staff to President William J. Clinton. He served in the president's cabinet and as a principal on the National Security Council. He was also a co-chairman of the Obama-Biden Transition Project and is currently the Chair of the Centre for American Progress.

As the High Level Panel prepares their agenda for Monrovia, Save the Children is today the first international non-governmental organization to put forward a proposed framework for consideration by the panel and governments around the world.

Save the Children proposes 10 goals

  • Goal 1: By 2030 we will eradicate extreme poverty and reduce relative poverty through inclusive growth and decent work
  • Goal 2: By 2030 we will eradicate hunger, halve stunting, and ensure universal access to sustainable food, water and sanitation
  • Goal 3: By 2030 we will end preventable child and maternal mortality and provide basic healthcare for all
  • Goal 4: By 2030 we will ensure children everywhere receive quality education and have good learning outcomes
  • Goal 5: By 2030 we will ensure all children live a life free from all forms of violence, are protected in conflict and thrive in a safe family environment
  • Goal 6: By 2030 governance will be more open, accountable and inclusive
  • Goal 7: By 2030 we will establish effective global partnerships for development
  • Goal 8: By 2030 we will build disaster-resilient societies
  • Goal 9: By 2030 we will ensure a sustainable, healthy and resilient environment for all
  • Goal 10: By 2030 we will deliver sustainable energy to all

The post-2015 framework should build on the strengths of the MDGs, including specific and measurable goals, targets and indicators. The framework should set common global aspirations (recognizing the importance of global cooperation) and allow countries to set national targets to suit their level of development.

The goals must achieve a balance of human development, economic development and environmental sustainability – the UN SG's 3 pillars of sustainable development – to ensure progress in human wellbeing is sustainable for future generations. We cannot reduce malnutrition without clean water. We cannot end preventable child deaths without educating girls.

The framework must also address some important gaps in the MDG framework, particularly:

  • Inequality. Eradicating poverty and preventable child deaths require a dedication to reaching the hardest to reach. Income inequality undermines long-term economic growth and inequalities between groups of people pose a barrier to further progress in human well-being
  • Accountability. The MDGs lacked a robust accountability mechanism. We propose a global mechanism to ensure global cooperation for global development and a national mechanism to support citizens holding their governments to account.
  • Outcomes. Some of the MDGs have been criticized for prioritizing access over outcomes. For example, while the current MDGs have rapidly improved school enrollment, in many schools those students are not actually learning.
  • Systems strengthening. The framework should promote strong service delivery systems that deliver for those populations that need them most. The current MDGs prioritize particular diseases for example and have diverted resources away from bigger health problems in some countries – a new framework must invest in both.

Read the report here: Ending Poverty in Our Generation

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.



Media Contacts
Eileen Burke 203.216.0718
Jeremy Soulliere 203.341.8203

Cristiano Ronaldo is an artist ambassador and celebrity supporter of Save the Children charity. 

Soccer star Cristiano Ronaldo talks to kids about healthy eating. Photo Credit: Jorge Monteiro.

MADRID (Jan. 2, 2013) – Real Madrid's football star Cristiano Ronaldo is kicking off 2013 as Save the Children's new Global Artist Ambassador. In his new role, Cristiano will fight child hunger and obesity, and promote physical activity and healthy eating.

"When I learned that 1 in 7 kids around the world go to bed hungry each night, I jumped at the chance to get involved," said Cristiano Ronaldo. "It is an honor to join Save the Children. I want to work with them to make sure that fewer parents will have to struggle with putting the right kinds of food on the table. I also want to encourage kids to get out there, get active and get fit."

"As a dad, I know it is important to give my two-year-old son a healthy life, right from the start, and I want to give all kids that same chance," added Cristiano. Cristiano, also the captain of the Portugal National Football team, will follow in the footsteps of Save the Children Artist Ambassadors Jennifer Connelly, Jennifer Garner, Randy Jackson and Julianne Moore in lending his voice and visibility for good.

"We are delighted to have such an incredible athlete working with us. Many children around the globe look up to Cristiano as a role model for healthy living and keeping fit," said Carolyn Miles, president and CEO of Save the Children. "Every day a child goes without eating healthy foods, it puts the brakes on his growth and development. We want to reach these children before the signs of hunger show up and they get in the habit of making unhealthy choices."

Last year, Save the Children reached more than 85 million children in nearly 120 countries with programs that help children survive and thrive and reach their potential. For example, to stem child hunger, Save the Children helps families provide for their children's basic nutritional needs through better access to healthy food, improved farming practices and opportunities to build their financial security. Save the Children also increases children's access to physical activity, nutrition education and healthy foods to address the childhood obesity crisis.

Read more at www.savethechildren.org/cristiano.

Save the Children is the leading independent organization for children in need, with programs in more than 120 countries, including the United States. We aim to inspire breakthroughs in the way the world treats children, and to achieve immediate and lasting change in their lives by improving their health, education and economic opportunities. In times of acute crisis, we mobilize rapid assistance to help children recover from the effects of war, conflict and natural disasters. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Without you...A Child Goes Without. See how you can help.


Access to South Sudan's Conflict Affected States Must be Improved in Order to Reach 1,000s of Children Affected by the Fighting - December 30, 2013

Save the Children Aid Flight Heads to South Sudan - Dec. 23, 2013

Taking Christmas to the Children of the Philippines  - Dec. 23, 2013

Children Suffering Severe Injuries From Violence in The Central African Republic - December 13, 2013

Decline in Education for Syrian Children "Worst and Fastest in Region's History" - December 13, 2013